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I recently got a well worn Python made in approximately 1967. In double action, it has what I think is called a stacking trigger. For most of the double action trigger movement, the pull is relatively light. Then it gets firmer just before it breaks. I think the intent is that in double action, you quickly take up the slack, then when the trigger pull firms up, you pause to aim before the trigger breaks. My question is this: Is this type of stacking trigger the norm for Pythons of that vintage, or was this done as a custom gunsmithing job?

I understand that some like this type of double action pull, but it feels awkward to me; especially since all of my other revolvers have a straight double action pull. Any comments on how to deal with that? Thanks
 

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Pythons are well know to have a "stacking" stage in D/A....Not certain how, (or why) to deal with that.
 

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The stacking is in the trigger.

The smiths that remove that, usually bend the seat leg of the trigger to make it more rounded. This was also how the Colt shop did their “trigger” job.

It depends on what you get used to. I grew up shooting Pythons, and can shoot them double action as accurately as single. It is like you say, I begin pulling the trigger while the pistol is in recoil. When I feel the stack, and hear the bolt click in to place, I refine my shot picture and shoot. It was possible to get a rhythm going, and seemed to work well in the PPC game.

The Smith trigger usually surprises me, before I am ready. However, if you want to shoot really fast, I think it is superior.


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