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My friend, if you were my neighbor, I'd do my best to talk you out of using a trigger shoe. I agree that the wider trigger surface makes for a very good feel and control. But I think it's a safety thing. I used one on an Official Police and later a Python for police service. They do have a way of catching on holsters. And they can work loose, too and bind your trigger pull altogether. I went through this business years ago and made up my mind if I had to have an extra wide trigger, to go S&W ... and least there, with the factory job - and hammer - it wouldn't come loose. I know of a few police dep'ts that prohibit the use of the shoes. I've tested them on the range and, sadly, I DID shoot better with it than without! But then, look at the SAA trigger ... it's just a sliver. I made my piece with the factory standard - as long as it's grooved or stippled or something. Just some advice from another gun guy, FWIW.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
rcwambold:

Thank you for the reply. I probably should have mentioned in my initial post that the Python is used exclusively for bullseye and ISSF type shooting. I would never put my baby in a holster.

Even so, I am grateful for the great points you made regarding very real safety issues.

Paul



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“So many tens, so little time

F. Paul Figlia - Attorney at Law
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An alternative though not cheap is to have the existing trigger built up through welding. I had a Python I sent to Jim Stroh www.alphaprisioninc.com that he welded up and contoured. I did not go extremely wide, though. It was made the width of the trigger on the Anaconda as I wanted it a bit narrower than the trigger guard. Another person who used to make wider Python triggers was Austin Behlert. His shop is now run by his son-in-law
Leckie at http://www.leckiecustomguns.com/

[This message has been edited by tomthel (edited 05-19-2004).]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Tomthel,

Thanks for the info you provided. Besides the trigger shoe issue, I would like to have some trigger work done on the Python - specifically, I want the single action trigger pull lightened to as close to 2.5 lbs as is possible.


The link to Jim Stroh doesnt appear to be working. Do you have another??

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“So many tens, so little time

F. Paul Figlia - Attorney at Law
[email protected]
 

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Sorry about the link. It should be www.alphaprecisioninc.com ; guess I can't spell. The Python I had had about a 2.5 pound single action and 6.5 pound double action. I believe this is the minimum specified based on the Kuhnhausen manual. There is a person that also does some work (supertunes on triggers) on Pythons. He is Dave Berry at http://www.berryhillguns.com . He posts a lot over at www.pistolsmith.com .

Normally on the "supertunes" the gunsmith tries to eliminate the stacking in double action on the trigger. The classic way is to heat and bend the rear surface of the trigger that cams the hammer. This makes reducing the single action well nigh impossible. Reeves Jungkind's tunes wherein he did this usually had a specified single action around 4 pounds.

There are several ways to get around this. The Walt Sherman roller action tune uses a roller action sear to cam the hammer and for whatever reason allows a relatively light single action. Austin Behlert had a way to get a light single action, too. He cut a groove in the rear of the trigger for the double action sear to ride in to take out the stacking but retain the rear edge as is for single action. Some gunsmiths used to weld a thin steel sheet underneath the rear of the trigger and instead of heating and bending the surface they use the additional thickness to allow cutting a curved surface.
Evidently, the additional length allows a reasonable single action.

At any rate I would inquire about what the single action will be after the tune and how they plan to accomplish this to avoid any rude surprises (I have had a few in tuning endeavors over the years). I do not think Stroh tunes his guns to a very light trigger pull. He is good at metal work, though.

As mentioned Austin Behlert is retired albeit his son-in-law continues operating the shop. Whether he tunes the Pythons in the manner of Austin I do not know. I do not know if Jungkind is still in business. The last I knew Walt Sherman was still in business in Tallahassee, FL. Dave Berry is in Arizona. He might (I don't know for certain) use Behlert's tuning method.

Tom


[This message has been edited by tomthel (edited 05-20-2004).]
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you tomthel for all the great information. I weighed the trigger a couple of times and while it breaks nicely, it does so at 3.5 - 4 lbs.

Take care

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“So many tens, so little time

F. Paul Figlia - Attorney at Law
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Forgot. I had Stroh make the trigger about .347" wide (which was supposed to be the width of an Anaconda trigger). As a comparison a S&W Target trigger is .400" wide and their combat trigger about .312" wide. I imagine he could do other shapes, too. The gun itself was tuned by Walt Sherman. Some of the tuners also play with firing pin protrusion and or lightening the firing pin spring to allow reduced trigger pulls.
 
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