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Discussion Starter #1
I’m no expert and want to understand why Pythons continue to go up? Don’t get me wrong, I bought a 4" in 99% condition about 2 years ago and they look really good. Just seems like there are a lot out of them out there but I don’t see the 2.5” models as much. My only regret is I didn’t buy a few years ago when they were much less.

I’m just trying to learn and hope to get your responses. Why do they continue to hold and increase value? Also, will they continue to go up in value?

Thanks
Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yep, saw that post. That post seemed to go more into The Walking Dead..! I get it’s Colts most successful post war gun and they are gorgeous. Just thought there might be more to it.

I was just curious so thank you for responding.

Thanks
Greg
 

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Why is Hip-Hop the predominate sound track for most TV commercials today? Why do people buy red sports cars?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Got it. I remember there was an article in the American Rifleman a few years ago about pythons and they expected the prices to level off. They were wrong!
 

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I shoot my 38 Python every week in my bullseye match, wipe it down with WD 40, put it in the bag and do it again. Shot a 277 last week and a 270 tonight. Glad I bought 2 in the mid 90s. It's sister 38 was shot in double action matches for years and now is shot annually in the Marine league open match here in pa I would sell neither. Can't imagine what I would replace them with.
 

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It's the law of supply and demand.

People want to own fine items like older, expensive cars and older no longer in production guns.
As these are bought up and are taken off the market, the demand outstrips the supply and prices rise.

The price goes up faster-higher when the item is in very limited supply (artwork) or the finer examples have been bought up and are off the market.
The price goes up when people want an out of production fine gun like a Python and are concerned they will not be able to buy a nice example in original factory condition.
With people having much more disposable income these days, many have no problem paying what are seemingly highly inflated prices.

Bottom line is, if people are paying a price for an item, that's what it's worth, no matter what someone else thinks.
 

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To answer your question: emotions and speculation dreams. Actually, the word on the street is Python prices are down from a 1-2 years ago, other than the random online bidding war for one. I think they will go down even more in the next 3 years.

For one, when the next recession hits, their prices will go lower. Newer collectors that bought high will be in positions to need the money, older collectors or their heirs will be trying to cash out at the same time. When the economy is doing well, people don't mind speculating on possible increases. Other economies cause opposite emotions. Most of what has caused the rise from their 1990s to early 2000s prices is emotions, like the stock market. It's not their rarity. It's not their capability compared to the trend of automatics with optical sights.
 

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I was a gun "accumulator". That was before I retired, was single with a good job. Built up my collection back in my early years. Now, I dont have extra money, dont NEED more guns. I own two nice pythons. I dont plan on selling them unless I absolutely need the money although I seldom shoot em. I wouldnt buy new ones even if I didnt have these, but I wouldnt sell these either.
 

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To answer your question: emotions and speculation dreams. Actually, the word on the street is Python prices are down from a 1-2 years ago, other than the random online bidding war
I don't see this with the python or other DA revolvers except the king cobra which seem to be stagnate.
Firearms seem to decline when a Republican is president and Trumps been around for 2 years so you can very well be right. I'm anxious to see how gun and ammo values are affected when a Democrat is elected president.
I might be forced to dig a big hole in my yard.
 

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Colt made over 550K Pythons before production ended. DiamondBack production was less, around 300K, & Anaconda production was much less.

These superior quality revolvers designed & manufactured by Colt have become rare because all production of these class revolvers has ended. Oh sure, Colt makes the new King Cobra, Kimber makes the KS6, & S&W makes the new frame/shroud bbl 19 & 66. So what.

Pythons will only increase in value past our obituaries.
 

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I've owned a double handful of Pythons and Diamondbacks but only managed to retain one of each. Prices were "reasonable" back in the 1970s and the guns were plentiful.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I passed on a few opportunities to buy two or three over the years. Guess I need to think about another
 

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For me.....its artwork; all colt revolvers and not only pythons. Same reason an art collector loves picasso.
Pythons are not the only colts that elevate in value. But I do not collect them to make money and I can care less if they lose value.


Well, I CAN'T care less since I don't care at all, and I will never buy another one.. And, like you, I don't collect them but I think they are beautiful. They are fine shooting instruments that deserve to be used. I, personally, have no use for a gun I'm afraid or don't want to fire. I have my one Python and it's had lots of .38 spl ammo through it but only a few .357s. Other than the .22LR I fire more .38 spl and .45 acp than all the others combined.
 
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