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A while back in the Python vs. Diamondback thread someone noted "The Python wasn't a Custom Shop gun until the very late 90's, starting with the Python Elite-marked guns.
Prior to this, the Python was a regular production item, NOT a Custom Shop item." This got me thinking about just how good the Python Elite is compared to a standard Python. Does anyone have any experience with both? Is the elite a much better revolver than the original? I've always scoffed at the prices of the elites but if they are custom shop guns they might really be worth the extra money. Any thoughts?
 

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I have not shot a Python Elite, but I have handled a few. I do not see where they are any better than a Python made in the 1970's or prior. Some later production Pythons (1980's and 90's) did come from the factory with heavy trigger pulls and less than stellar finishes, this is the result of cost cutting and Colt's using less skilled labor to assemble guns. I guess Colt really needed to put the Python in the hands of the Custom Shop to justify the price of the Python and maintain a higher level of quality control.

For the money, I'll take an older Python. I have two, both from the 1970's.

[This message has been edited by stans (edited 06-24-2004).]
 

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It's just the marketing forces at work. Like when they named the 4 inch Python the Combat Python. The revolvers are the same, but in marketing if you jazz up the name you hope to sell a few more units.
 

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I have a 4 in. stainless Python Elite that my wife got me for Christmas. I also have a 6 in. blue(of course) made in '69 and a 2 1/2 in. blue from the 70's. Both the blued guns have sensationally light, smooth double and single actions and are more accurate than I can shoot. The new Elite has a slightly heavier-though smooth-action that has lightened up with use. Despite this, it is also very accurate. I didn't care for the finish (when they call it "brushed" stainless it sure looks it) so I used my Dremel, cloth polishing wheels, and a variety of soft cloths, and "Flitz" to polish the exterior down to a bright stainless finish. It's now a beautiful gun! I also replaced the Hogue-type grips with older walnut targets. Quite a bit of work-though enjoyable- but it's now where I want it.
 

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asa, what is Flitz? a polishing compound? I want to polish out a few minor scratches on my SS anaconda with my dremel, but do not know what kind of compound to use.
 

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Flitz is labeled as a metal and fiberglass cleaner. It's made in Germany and is quite expensive, costing about 9 bucks for a 1 3/4 oz. tube. With that out of the way, it is the best cleaner and scratch remover for stainless steel I've found-and I've tried them all. (Just like you, I discovered it on one of the forums) It also leaves a coating on the metal that, as they say, "protects it from further corrosion". Could be, but I just repolish every week or after I've fired the gun. Their brochure also claims it won't harm post-war bluing, but be careful. I get it at my local shop (they didn't know what it could do until I showed them) but you can order it on the net. Or just Google "Flitz" to find it. Good luck.
 

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Flitz works very well. Something else that you may want to try and is very easy to find would be Mothers mag wheel polish.
I use it on all my Stainless guns and it makes them & me quite happy.


Jeff (GUNKWAZY)
 

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Kennedy, if you polish the scratches on your Anaconda you will make that portion of the revolver shine and not match the matte finish. It would then be necessary to polish the whole revolver for an even finish.
To keep the matte finish try lightly buffing the area with fine steel wool soaked in oil. Buff with circular motions varying the pressure applied and you may still have to go over a very large area to keep an even finish.
 

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Sorry, I have to caution about using steel wool on stainless.

NEVER use steel wool on stainless steel.
Tiny particles of the steel embeds into the stainless and RUSTS later, leaving stains.

If you need to remove scratches on a mat finished pistol like standard non-bead blasted Colt's, S&W's, and Rugers, use a synthetic abrasive pad.

These are like the green pot scrubbing pads sold in grocery stores, only in a finer "grit".

The best place to find these, is in the sandpaper department of a hardware store like Lowe's.

I use the #0000-equivalent pad.
The green grocery store pads can be used to remove heavy scratches and then the finish can be blended into the rest of the gun with the #0000 pad, but be careful, the green pads are coarse.

At one time, Brownell's sold a set of three synthetic pads that duplicated the grained finish on Colt, Ruger, and S&W pistols.
 
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