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Discussion Starter #1
On the barrel of my Python, as everyone else's, it says
PYTHON 357
* 357 Magnum ctg *
Ok, so...why the 357 after the name, and then the cartridge designation?
Was the name originally intended to be the " Python 357"? Kinda like the
"357" ( three fifty seven) with the name Python thrown in front?
There doesn't seem to be any other reason to have 357 on there twice....
 

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When the Python was introduced, the .357 Smith & Wesson Magnum cartridge was the most powerful available. Therefore, having "357" on the barrel said to all the world that THIS is a powerful gun. Also, keep in mind that there were .38 Special Pythons, and the barrels were so marked.

The considered-but-never built .256 Winchester Magnum and .22 Long Rifle chamberings would have had the barrels so marked. I have a brochure showing the .256 Python, the "256" and the Single Action Army all chambered in the .256 Winchester Magnum and so marked on their barrels.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
But having it on there twice is redundant. And I thought the 38 SPL models came much later.....tho now I think of it , I've never seen one of those in person....I wonder what the barrel markings are on that model.....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here’s a link to an excellent site with info that should address your Python questions...
Python
Jack
Thank you, sir. Very interesting. Still leaves me wondering why 357 isn't part of the original name, when clearly Silhouette is on that later model......oh well......
One thing though, the GCA was 1968, not 1965.....in 1965 I was 12, and drooling over Shooting Times' ads for mail order guns.
 

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The barrel stamp was simply Colt's way of marking the gun, but the model name was simply the "Python" not "Python 357".

When the 4 inch barrel version was released it was widely advertised as the "Police Python" but the guns were never marked with that name, simply "Python".

This is no more complicated then stamping the barrel as the "Python 357" was Colt's choice.
 

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I've never been able to understand the fact that a .357 and a .38 are the same caliber. Why didn't they name it ".38 Magnum"? There is a .44 Magnum and a .44 Special, so why not .38 Magnum?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've never been able to understand the fact that a .357 and a .38 are the same caliber. Why didn't they name it ".38 Magnum"? There is a .44 Magnum and a .44 Special, so why not .38 Magnum?
Maybe they should both be .36 calibre. Isn't that what they're closest to?
 

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I've never been able to understand the fact that a .357 and a .38 are the same caliber. Why didn't they name it ".38 Magnum"? There is a .44 Magnum and a .44 Special, so why not .38 Magnum?
Get in your time machine and go back to 1935 and ask Smith & Wesson marketing. For one thing, it was "new" and different and therefore fitting for this new MAGNUM cartridge that spawned the "Magnum" era for handguns. Perhaps another factor was to prevent any confusion with the .38 Special cartridge.

When you are back there, ask them why the .44 Special is not the .429 Special. Be sure and stop in 1955 to ask why the .44 Magnum is not the .429 Magnum. As you are on your way back, stop off in 1964 and ask Smith & Wesson why the .41 Magnum is really a .41 caliber cartridge. Inquiring minds want to know!
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Get in your time machine and go back to 1935 and ask Smith & Wesson marketing. For one thing, it was "new" and different and therefore fitting for this new MAGNUM cartridge that spawned the "Magnum" era for handguns. Perhaps another factor was to prevent any confusion with the .38 Special cartridge.

When you are back there, ask them why the .44 Special is not the .429 Special. Be sure and stop in 1955 to ask why the .44 Magnum is not the .429 Magnum. As you are on your way back, stop off in 1964 and ask Smith & Wesson why the .41 Magnum is really a .41 caliber cartridge. Inquiring minds want to know!
Get in your time machine and go back to 1935 and ask Smith & Wesson marketing. For one thing, it was "new" and different and therefore fitting for this new MAGNUM cartridge that spawned the "Magnum" era for handguns. Perhaps another factor was to prevent any confusion with the .38 Special cartridge.

When you are back there, ask them why the .44 Special is not the .429 Special. Be sure and stop in 1955 to ask why the .44 Magnum is not the .429 Magnum. As you are on your way back, stop off in 1964 and ask Smith & Wesson why the .41 Magnum is really a .41 caliber cartridge. Inquiring minds want to know!
Maybe a smiley face in there would have helped to let him know you weren't being, you know, like intentionally rude or anything......😊
Your comment about them wanting to differentiate 357 from 38 makes sense, tho not a safety factor since they made the 357 case longer so they wouldn't go in a 38 chamber, and avoided Colt's mistake with the 38 acp/super .....
 

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Perhaps the marketing folks at Colt had plans to make a "Python 22" and a "Python 44" and a "Python ??" and the plans fell through. After that it was just easier to leave things the way they were.
 

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The story is that Dan Wesson who invented the .357 cartridge named it after the magnum Champaign bottle.
The magnum was a much larger bottle then the standard, and the new .357 was a larger case.

Marketing, marketing, marketing.
 

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That's why I love reading and learning about the history of firearms and ammunition. A mixture of art, science, engineering and marketing. Those pioneers (Colt, Wesson, etc) must have been characters...............
 

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Perhaps the marketing folks at Colt had plans to make a "Python 22" and a "Python 44" and a "Python ??" and the plans fell through. After that it was just easier to leave things the way they were.
Possibly so. Colt experimented with both .41 Magnum and .22LR Pythons.
 

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The story is that Dan Wesson who invented the .357 cartridge named it after the magnum Champaign bottle.
If so, I wonder what the folks at Holland & Holland used as their inspiration for naming the .375 H & H Magnum in 1912 and the .300 H & H Magnum in 1925?

Maybe fire up that time machine again to go back and ask, but only if RW will not be offended.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
If so, I wonder what the folks at Holland & Holland used as their inspiration for naming the .375 H & H Magnum in 1912 and the .300 H & H Magnum in 1925?

Maybe fire up that time machine again to go back and ask, but only if RW will not be offended.
Dude......... can't take joke, cobber?😊
 
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