Colt Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,979 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mornin',
I was able to attend my first Gun Show in awhile on Saturday. I found a fella walking around with an early 1902 Military with the round hammer (1908). Though the front half moon sight has been replaced, it appeared in pretty darn good shape and I thought should be a nice shooter. As there was a gathering cluster waiting for their chance at it I gave his asking price, which was reasonable, and stuffed it in my bag (along with two full boxes of older 38 acp that came with it)

Normally I would always have the seller remove the slide, but as everything seemed to function, didn't. Oops. As I did so at home, the front of the barrel fell away from the frame. I immediately thought broken barrel front link. but it's not. It appears that at some point, someone drifted out the frame front cross pin, though there are no adverse marks on the convex pin ends, and when they re-installed it, missed the links bottom hole. There is no damage to the barrel, frame or slide so am thinking it wasn't fired after the "repair" (though I can't see anything that may have been replaced)

On-line info is sparse, and this Forum is the best source for information anyway. I need to drift that front cross pin out enough to allow me to then drive it appropriately back through the link. So: can anyone give me advice as to:
1) proper drift size and a drift tool that may not damage the nice rounded surface of the pin,
2) is there a proper direction to drive the pin, left to right or vice versa,
3) any specific tricks of the trade to keep all the internals in place while doing so (I did read where you need to push in just a bit on the concave button to release pressure on the pin.)
I appreciate any info that can be passed along.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,979 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thank you very much for taking the time to find the video and reply. I may not have been very clear in my description of the problem and my questions. I am aware about the wedge, and pressing the concave button under the muzzle in order to remove said wedge and therefore the slide off to the rear.

I am, however, not actually inquiring about that wedge, but the cross pin located at the front of the frame that goes thru the bottom hole of the front barrel link. In the video that small "pin" can be seen on the frame, just about 1/2" aft of the muzzle end. Again, thanks for the video. Liked seeing, and wouldnt mind having, the 1902 the fella is taking apart.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
126 Posts
Just go get a pin punch with a counter sunk or hollow face, that is smaller than the pin, even if not the exact size it will match the crown of the pin. take the grip off of the side you will be laying the gun on, it makes it more stable and you don't have to worry about cracking the grip. Oil the pin let it sit for a while, take your punch and drift it out, you will not have to go all the way just far enough to clear the barrel link. The pins are actually pretty hard, unless you just go nuts on them, you wont damage them. The front pin in my 1900 came out easily the one in my 1902 was harder. If you go all the way through your takedown plug will come out. Line your link and takedown plug back up tap the pin back in and your done. They go in and out either way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,979 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Vytautus,
Thank you for the information.
I suppose the hollow face drift pin info would have actually occurred to me as pretty obvious with time, but the info that the pin drives either way and the reminder to take off the grips (they do appear original to the gun) is the kind of information I was hoping for. Thanks for taking the time to help out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,097 Posts
I've done it many times and I have limited gunsmithing ability. Again, use a hollow face punch from either direction. Be careful of the finish. While the barrel is free, go ahead and clean the underside of the barrel and upper frame. I often use a smaller diameter junk pin (even a stout paper clip) to get the link and everything lined up, checking the parallel ruler like functioning, prior to putting the correct pin into place. If my memory serves, I also hold the recoil spring plunger back so there is no tension on the link or takedown plug. Don't let the spring fly - often they can be hard to relocate after their escape to freedom. Should be easy after the first time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,979 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the info provided. Apparently those hollow face punches are called "cup tip". Brownells has a full set for $100 or so, and individually they're about $18 a piece. I don't mind paying for good tools but seems abit pricey. Anyone know a different source for these. Perhaps I'll just have to measure the pin and pick up one at a tome as needed
 

·
Forum Friend
Joined
·
5,858 Posts
Unless you are working on a high condition gun, a common punch will do just fine. The pins are very hard and have convex ends, so at worst you are contacting only a tiny area of the pin. I have punched dozens of pins in & out and don't even own a special punch. I always punch in from the right & out from the left because of my failing memory info that was Colt practice for such things as pins, dovetail sights, etc.

Other than cosmetic protection, the cavity end punches offer the benefit of tending to center the punch over the pin, thus protecting the frame from damage by an un-centered punch. If you use a common flat end punch be sure it is a tad smaller than the diameter of the pin & carefully aligned entering the hole in the frame.

Some of mine when I reassemble them do have high condition finish, see before/after:

 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top