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Discussion Starter #1
My new Diamondback arrived yesterday. 1978 six inch blue "R" series serial number.

This revolver is literally brand new. I am almost certain I could never have done better. Appears to be positively unfired and unturned as described by the seller.

Now here's the question and/or problem:

This gun has been just sitting for twenty-seven years and it appears that the original lubricant from the Colt factory has congealed into an almost solid gunk. So much so that we had a difficult time getting the latch open. My FFL dealer sprayed it with some protective lubricant cleaner and we let it sit for about ten minutes. We were finally able to open the latch to get the serial number. The latch now moves but is still very stiff.

My FFL dealer isn't a gunsmith, but he's no dummy either. He made the comment that it might be prudent to take this gun apart and clean it inside and out because over time the residue might become acidic and possibly damage the gun internally.

I'd like to be 100% certain of the best and SAFEST way to clean this pistol. I DO NOT want to disassemble it unless it is absolutely necessary. However, if what my FFL said is true, should I find a qualified gunsmith to clean this revolver professionally?

I don't want to do anything that would damage the condition of this gun or degrade from it's collector value. But I also want it to be stored and preserved properly.

Thanks for any and all suggestions.

Mark A.
 

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Call Colt Customer Service. Most Gunsmith's are not qualified or even "Willing" to work on Colt's! You don't want to trust just anyone to work on your Diamondback! Colt will send you a packet of information, regarding sending your gun to them to be worked on and their proceedure as well as your Colt Factory options? Colt has a toll free number-but, I don't have this number handy, to give you!

[This message has been edited by Colt38 (edited 03-18-2005).]
 

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Not a bad problem to have,Mark! I guess your not talking about actual "work" being done on the gun,just a good "field strip"/clean. Sounds like someone went a little "overboard" with the lubricant,in the Dback,the factory,former owner,etc.

Your right in not trying to do it yourself,as removing(and more so installing, with the cylinder latch lined up right!),is not e-z the first few times,and a "mint" Dback,s NOT the gun to practice on! You would also need proper fitting screwdrivers,and punch to remove the rebound lever from grip frame. Here is where a copy of Kuhnhausens book,that ia talked about daily on the Forum,would be a big help.

There is "petrified,fossilized" lubricant inside the gun,and while it is e-z to clean(and relubricate) getting to it is difficult.
Just "squirting" in a spray wont do it,and could dislodge a piece of crud,tying up the action.

I gotta think,there must be a gunsmith in your area that is competent enough to "field strip" and clean the Dback. He obviously has no parts to replace or repairs to make-and make damn sure you insist on just a cleaning! Good Luck,Bud
 

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Cylinder and Slide used to sell a product that was a solvent in a bucket, Dunk It(?) or some such that I used with success on a couple of old revolvers that had fossilized oil/grease to the point where the cylinders would barely turn. Took the stocks off, let soak overnight, and used spray lube to finish up. That might work as a last resort if you can't find a competent gunsmith. HTH
 

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There is a lubricant named Kroil that is red in color (it has a nickname of Redeye). Just remove the stocks and immerse the revolver in this solvent/lubricant overnight and then blow with compressed air. It should dissolve the congealed lubricant and it doesn't affect the finish.
Look for Kroil in your hardware stores or you can order it online. http://www.kanolabs.com/
 

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Just read about "Ed's Red" over on the S&W site. They also mentioned the "Cylinder and Slide - Dunk it". Plus there is an interesting photo of a revolver with the sideplate removed, showing some of the gunk shipped from the factory. If it were my Diamondback, I would try the Ed's Red, if that didn't loosen things up, I'd take it to a qualified gunsmith and have it professionally cleaned.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'd like to thank everyone for their suggestions. I am trying to get input from everywhere before moving forward. I will contact Colt directly for their expert advice and also let my local gun dealer take a look at it.

I am bit reluctant to "soak" the whole revolver in any solution unless completely certain it will not harm the finish. I am investigating the Kroil, and even though it sounds promising, I don't think I would trust myself to home brew a batch of "Ed's Red".

I should have this revolver by the end of the week and I am going to attempt some "before and after" pictures.

Once again, thanks to all.

Mark A.
 
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