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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know how many of these were made with and without the scene stamped into the cylinder? Also, would one built with out the cylinder scene be more likely for a military order? I have one that was made in 1862 and lacks the cylinder scene, however, it has perfectly stamped into the cylinder, just the patent date. Thanks in advance. I
 

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Re: question on an 1860 Army 44

It's my understanding that only the fluted cylinder model had no scene . All round cylinders had the navy scene . Your's doesn't have it , so I guess anything within reason is possible . However , unless it was a Rare gun intended for engraving , the scene has simply worn away . They were only lightly rolled onto the cylinder where the serial and patent line were apparently stamped . These are just my observations . I'm not an expert on the 1860 .

Mine is well worn , but with good markings . The cylinder scene is gone . The other numbers are present on the cylinder .

 

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Re: question on an 1860 Army 44

I know that mine has not worn away as the patent date stamping is still crisp and clean. The gun over all has very little actual wear. I found another one on Cabelas not too long ago identical to mine without the scene.
Also, what would another digit stamped under the serial number mean? On the frame and trigger guard there is a "2" stamped under the serial number which is 41365. The barrel assembly is serial number 41376 with a "2" stamped over the top of that serial number. The fact that its only 11 digits off from the original number seems to me that the barrel assembly was mated at the factory or under conditions of a military shipment where several 1860s models were there with close serial numbers. I would really like to post some photos of this gun. I am definately going to get a factory letter on this one.
 

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Re: question on an 1860 Army 44

Hi Moosedog,

You said "...Also, what would another digit stamped under the serial number mean? On the frame and trigger guard there is a "2" stamped under the serial number which is 41365. The barrel assembly is serial number 41376 with a "2" stamped over the top of that serial number."

If memory serves me correctly... The early M-1860 Army contract guns were shipped in pairs with one shoulder stock and issued this way to each Cavalry trooper. Colt fitted the stock to both guns... so a "1" and a "2". He would get gun "1" and gun "2" and one shoulder stock. The saddle held the two pistols in pommel holsters... My opinion as I can't remember the exact source for this... Bob Best
 

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Re: question on an 1860 Army 44

moosedog,

The patent stampings are much, much deeper than the roll engraving and the navel scene could be worn away long before the patent stampings, due to holster wear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: question on an 1860 Army 44

It is cut for a shoulder stock with the lug cut on the bottom of the butt frame. It also has two holes drilled and tapped on the butt. We discussed this in the shop that I bought it from and a customer who is pretty familiar with older Colts laughed and said "Colt sold to both sides" We asked him what he meant and told us that the Mexican's used to secure their shoulder stocks to the bottom of the butt with two screws. Supposedly they had a different shoulder stock that they prefered. He said "both sides," as Colt wasn't supposed to be selling guns to Mexico during the Mexican / America Land dispute.
The patient date is sharp, not rubbed over which leads me to believe this one never had the scene engraved. If it was part of a government contract shipment, is it possible that government contract guns would not have the cylinder engraving?
Can I send a few photos to someone who could post them for me? I really think you guys would find this interesting. I plan on getting a factory letter on this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Re: question on an 1860 Army 44

Well, this is my first attempt at posting pictures on a forum. With a little help from you guys and my 12 year old son we finally have my new (old) toy on here to see. The box is later design with non original mold, balls and cap box but I did get that little envelope of original caps with the gun. I'll try to get some more photos in here.
 

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Re: question on an 1860 Army 44

While looking at your pic in Photobucket, highlight and (edit) copy the IMG line below it. Then simply paste it into your post. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

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Re: question on an 1860 Army 44

Thanks A1. This is fun. Now the wife will never get me off this thing. I took a close up of the patent date and butt with the two holes drilled and tapped. Any ideas? The previous owner had it since the late 60s and used to shoot it along with several others. We found his loading data with it.
 
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