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I hope someone out there can settle this question for me on the english proofs on the colt saa's and other's sent to england.
Did vonoppen have the guns refinished again after proofing was done.
question, if a brand new blue or nickel gun was sent to england,and apon arrival sent to the proof house, why then did;nt the area around the stamps start to rust, particuly on nickel guns. or did they,and iff so would of that been good buisness practise for the agent. although the bermingham proof is very tiny, you would think it would brake the nickel.
I have a few blue ,pommy saa's, no nickel, but none near mint to see if the stamp area is rusted.
appreciate any comments.
 

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Colt also applied some of the markings after the pistol was finished with no problem from rusting. The assembler and the final inspectors identification mark was either a letter or number, and the Verified Proof mark were all applied after finish. I feel sure that after the proofing process the pistols would have been cleaned and preserved before putting them back in their box.
 

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What was the shipping date of your S&W? The British proofs are post 1954. What are the letters at the 9:00 and 3:00 position on the crossed scepters?

Beautiful pistol.
 

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What was the shipping date of your S&W? The British proofs are post 1954. What are the letters at the 9:00 and 3:00 position on the crossed scepters?

Beautiful pistol.
JohnnyP,
That is interesting, I always thought it might be a "Battle of Britain" gun, but I guess not!:(
The 9:00 position letter is P and the 3:00 position letter is B.

This gun is a S&W 32-20 Hand Ejector 1st model introduced in 1899. It is one of the first ones produced; serial number 117, shipped on March 6, 1899 to P. B. Bekeart & Co., San Francisco, CA. I bought it at a Houston gun show in 1981.
 

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The PXB would indicate the pistol was proofed in 1964. Bear in mind that the proofing only took place when the firearm was to be sold commercially and not when it arrived in England. It could have been a B of B gun, but through unknown circumstances did not reach the commercial market in England until 1964.

Very interesting and nice revolver.
 
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