Colt Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After fixing the bolt spring on my most recent purchase I took it out for a range session. I am a sub-par recreation shooter with tererible vision, but it was a pleasure taking such a nice piece out. I was able to make hits touching each other at 25 yards a couple of times. Shooting 158 grain LRN I had to move the front sight all the way up to not shoot high. The SA trigger is so light, and the double action rivals that of my Python.

The outside of the gun is in excellent condition, the inside looked excellent as well, it just had old varnished oil I had to get out. I found a weight between the grips with someone's name on it. I am getting the gun lettered to find out more.

The weight plus the worn wooden grips makes me thing the gun was shot regularly, but the lack of wear in the finish makes me think it was taken care of extremely well. I'm very glad to have this in my collection.
734181
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
They are straight up tack drivers!

This is the first 12 rounds from my 1937 Officers in .22, offhand two hand hold at 15 yards; ammunition was Winchester T-22.
734185

734186


Mine has a little bluing wear (not nearly as nice as yours), and the original grips were worn nearly smooth, so like yours, this one has been shot a lot, yet still produces outstanding groups.

I have since changed the grips to the brown plastic (can't remember what Colt called it), and a Tyler T-grip. I tend to have 2-3 sets of grips for each of my guns...I'm fickel, and swap grips often.

Your OMT is magnificent!!
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,501 Posts
The Colt Officer's Models were intended to be Colt's top of the line revolver.
They held most of the Match records in the days when the revolver was King of the Matches, and most of the top shooters used Colt's.

The only Colt that equaled it was the New Service based Shooting Master.
Colt intended these to be the best in the world and they were.

Since the Officer's Models were pushing the envelope of what is possible in a double action revolver, many of them will rival the Python in pure accuracy, as well illustrated in the above target.
If you're wanting to put holes in a target you can't do better even with later designed revolvers, with the possible exception of the New Python.

Rifle development has gone light years beyond any rifle of just a few years ago with accuracy that would have left shooters of the pre-war to 1960's absolutely astounded and would seem like something out of a science fiction story.
Current production revolvers however, have at best only managed to possibly equal an Officer's Model, and that fittingly, usually the Colt New Python.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
To get any more accurate with a revolver, you'd have to take a pre-war OMT and find the most accurate chamber and use it as a single shot...because you're not likely to find a more accurate 6 shot revolver.

I have found the pre-war Colt target revolvers to be absolute tops. A .38 Special OMT will give a Python all it can handle on the target range.

DA actions on the OMT's are usually glass smooth, but stiff. That's because they are built to be target guns that will be shot 99% single action. Do some spring adjustment to the OMT and the DA will rival the best of the Pythons.

I wouldn't mind adding a .32 and a .38 OMT too my collection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
I have the same one made in '36, but nowhere near as nice as yours. I had to install a new bolt and rebound lever because the old parts were causing the cylinder to skip. I also had to source the correct grips. Now that all of that is sorted out, the gun shoots great.

These were finished as well as any Python and the action is the same, and they are better than the later OMM models in terms of fit and finish. I like the little details on this era of Colts. The true blue on it is a nicer color than the blacker blue of the 50s and beyond in my opinion. I like the checkered trigger and backstrap instead of the grooved that came later during the OMM and Python years.

I also like the sights. They seem more durable than the accro rear site and they are lower profile. They didn't require as much milling out of the topstrap.

Just really slick guns all around and they go for a nice sum today. Enjoy it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
The true blue on it is a nicer color than the blacker blue of the 50s and beyond in my opinion...
Carbonia blue vs. DuLite Hot Blue. I agree completely, the earlier fume Carbonia bluing is my absolute favorite. Turnbull offers his "Carbonia" blue as do several others, but it's just not the same (color wise). Colt used the actual brand name Carbonia and Winchester did the same process, but not branded; as did Smith & Wesson and Remington. The end result...The best looking bluing I have ever seen. I haven't seen any of the modern alchemists actually match the color; although their various "Carbonia" bluings typically look fantastic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
This variant of the pre-war Officers Model with the heavy barrel and Maltese Cross is my favorite of the Officer Models. Your gun is in excellent shape and well cared for by the previous owner. Is the weight made of lead or steel? and have you tried shooting the gun with and without this weight. I guess this counterbalances any muzzle heaviness from the heavy barrel. It's an interesting custom addition for a serious bullseye revolver shooter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Very nice OMT, I think they're a great gun - I've got several. My 22, a 1940 model, doesn't shoot as good as DarkLords. I haven't tried very many different makes of ammo. On the other hand my 32 and 38 shoot great, especially the 32. Enjoy your OMT!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The weight is lead. I keep it in the gun because that's how the original owner had it. It does balance nicely with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
That's a good looking OMT Tomahawk. When you get the letter, maybe you can also do some research on who Robert J. Lindsay Jr. was and see if you can place him around the time and location that the gun was shipped to. Bullseye shooters back around the time the gun was produced still shot one handed, with their off hand on their hip or in their back pocket and the addition of the weight was a personalized touch by someone who felt it improved his shooting. I like it.

I have a pair of OMT's, a .38 from 1940 and a .22 from 1932. It took a while to find nice examples of each. Both have very smooth actions, they were hand honed from the factory.
If you can find any these days or if you reload, try the classic 148 grain full wadcutter loads sometime.

Colt Officers Model Target .22 & .38.JPG
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top