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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Earlier thread about this Python: http://www.coltforum.com/forums/python/68254-finally-i-ve-found-my-range-gun.html

After a couple of months, I finally had time to go to the Top Gun range here in Houston and test fire this first shooter of mine last Saturday (my wife and I just had our 3rd baby the same month I acquired this Python). I remember a couple of members, one of which was also watching this gun on GB, wanted me to give an update about how the gun shoots given the fact that the Python was from 1957 + refinished but looked good in photos + came with original 1st generation stocks = good deal at $1,400.


Having acquired only collectible grade Pythons before, I had mixed feelings when I first received the gun.


Two things that got me a little down were:
1. Not all the rolled marks were there (as I expected them not to be, but still....you know).
2. Most areas of the gun showed smooth surface with good quality refinishing (re-bluing), except the very narrow vertical side surfaces above the ribs on top of the 6" barrel where traces of surface damages were noticeable underneath the new finish. These are such narrow areas that would be extremely difficult to buff. When left this way, the top corners are still very sharp. In fact, the corners are still pretty sharp for the entire gun come to think of it.


Two things that brought me right back up were:
1. The original 1st generation stocks. They appeared to be in very good condition. I'm just glad I own ones now :)
2. Timing and lockup appeared to be good. After all I bought this rather unique gun to shoot :)


I put the original 1st generation stocks away and acquired Colt factory rubber grips with gold medallions as shown in the photos just to give the gun a little bling for a shooter because I thought she deserved it :) I mention this because I would like to add an observation here that the new rubber grips actually wrap around the the back strap of the Python, unlike the original stocks, which wrap the Python only on the side and leave the back strap bare to touch. This makes pulling the hammer down to cock the gun for a single-action shot a little unnatural because for a single-action shot, the hammer has to travel a little farther down for the hammer to become cocked than it does for a double-action shot. As a result, the rubber grips sort of are in the way, barely, but it is undeniable that they are in the way, and every cocking of the gun for a single-action shot requires a little firmer thumb push to press the hammer against the rubber just to make sure that the hammer stay cocked. There was no problem at all with the original 1st generation stocks that came with the gun. I'm not sure whether the Hogue or Pachmayr rubber grips without the gold medallions presents such issue on the Pythons (or older Pythons to be specific) or not. I've never seen any post complaining about it.


This may sound a little naive, but I have to tell you that since I was 15 years old I have shot several calibers of bullets (.38, .45 ACP, 9mm, 12 GA, etc.), but I have not shot .357 magnum rounds before this. So I actually had an small adrenaline rush before I fired the first shot of this powerful cartridge on an old gun that I knew very little about. Even with eye protection, I actually closed my eyes when I was pulling the trigger for the first single-action shot to go Bang!


The first couple of shots, I aimed at 6 O'Clock on a target that was 20 ft away and they went low. After that I realized that I just had to aim at dead center and be a little more mindful about my unsteady pull of the trigger and got it right on the 6th shot. After the first six shots, I started shooting double-action. Then I proceeded to start shooting double-action with one hand and enjoyed it so much I didn't care for the single-action or the two-handed shots again. That's when I realized that the 6" Python was probably just a little too big and too heavy for one-handed shooting (for me). But I kept doing it and remember thinking that my oh my I was now spoiled with this unbelievably smooth trigger pull I didn't think I was going to be able to enjoy other revolvers or shooting with two hands again. In the end, I must tell you that I gained a lot of satisfaction shooting the .357 magnum rounds because every single time it went bang from this Python, the air around me just moved I could almost see it.


I didn't bring my own ammo and that day the range only had the defensive rounds available for purchase. After I fired some .357 rounds, I then tried a box of 100 rounds of .38 Special aiming at different numbers on the target and tried to group the double-action one-handed shots from shooting at the rate of about 1 shot/second (more fun this way). Having just shot the .357 rounds, these .38 Special rounds felt like .22 caliber rounds --- extremely pleasant to shoot. I then closed with the .357 rounds that I had left just to bring the feeling of shooting them with this Python home with me.


As you can probably tell, I'm very very happy with this Python :)

Robert


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I have a 57 Python as well and I love shooting it. I keep the original full checkered stocks on it and carry it in a holster often as it is only ~85% original finish. It is a slick gun and is one of my pistols that will never leave. Congrats on finding yours
 

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Looks like a fun first time out with it. Hell,you even managed to shoot the little number 5 in the left hand corner,poor feller, I haven't shot a python yet but look forward to it someday. Enjoy
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a 57 Python as well and I love shooting it. I keep the original full checkered stocks on it and carry it in a holster often as it is only ~85% original finish. It is a slick gun and is one of my pistols that will never leave. Congrats on finding yours
Rob, we spoke once before in my earlier thread about our '57 Pythons. I had many people telling me to save the original full checkered stocks, so I did. But next time I go to the range I will try shooting with them on. By the way, I will trade my perfectly refinished Python with your Python and 85% original finish any day :p

Thanks for the range report. I think it may be the first Ive seen here for a 57 Python. In fact, I don't remember many other Python range reports.
To be honest with you, I didn't really know what I was required to do at the range in order to write a range report for a gun. I guess I was just reporting back about the things that a few of us were wondering about this particular Python in the old thread. Also, I guess the Pythons are just too old for anyone to write a rather technical range report about these days. Probably not too many people still shoot their 1950's Pythons because of their collectible nature anyway. Come to think of it, I should probably have titled my thread "My First Shooting Experience with a 1957 Python" instead hahaha :eek:

What fun! Thanks for the honest and exciting account! Yep, shoots like a Python alright. :cool:
Thanks! It was really fun. Especially when a few guys sort of walked over to watch the thing you were shooting in action. Maybe no one asked about it because I looked BAD with it :cool:

Looks like a fun first time out with it. Hell,you even managed to shoot the little number 5 in the left hand corner,poor feller, I haven't shot a python yet but look forward to it someday. Enjoy
prostrok, that number 5 poor feller was the 2nd bad guy. He was farther away, so he appeared smaller. With some effort, I got him, too. He was just as bad as the big green guy :p

FourFeet, give that Python it's rightful stocks back!
Hahaha you know, I'm sort of leaning toward putting the full-checkered stocks back on the shooter now. They're not brand new anymore, so couldn't hurt, right? :D
 

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You should consider relieving the rubber stocks a bit where the hammer hits the stocks upon cocking for single action shooting. I bought a custom set of Herrett's target stocks, built to fit my hand, and had to both fit the stocks to the gun, and relieve the area where the hammer was prevented from being cocked for single action firing, and now those stocks work fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I just purchase a 1956 and it comes out of Kali gun jail this week... Also have a 59 but haven't shot it yet.. So many beautiful women so little time... Great report... Thanks.
Thank you and Congrats on your 1956 . If you decide to go out with any of your beautiful ladies, let us know how she shoots. :D

You should consider relieving the rubber stocks a bit where the hammer hits the stocks upon cocking for single action shooting. I bought a custom set of Herrett's target stocks, built to fit my hand, and had to both fit the stocks to the gun, and relieve the area where the hammer was prevented from being cocked for single action firing, and now those stocks work fine.
Thanks for the advice. I do think about trimming off the rubber stocks a little bit so they are not in the path of the hammer. I'm still thinking about the kind of tool that will provide a nice smooth and clean cut on the rubber without ruining the stocks. :D
 
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