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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Earlier this year I decided to begin looking for a second Glock 19 that I would have available in the event that anything ever happened to my primary CC G19. In February I was able to find a gentleman through another gun forum who was willing to trade me a G19 for my G17. We made the deal and later that month I picked up a 2008 manufactured 3rd generation Glock 19 from my FFL. It was in pristine condition. The previous owner told me that he had fired, at most, 200rds through it since he bought it. Needless to say, I set out to make this travesty right and treated this handgun like the Glock that it is.

Before I began the 1,000rd break-in period, though, I ordered and installed a beaver tail backstrap from Grip Force Adapters. I have used their backstrap on my other G19 since January 2011 and have put well over 3,000rds down range with it attached. It eliminated the problem of slide-bite that I have with Glocks. This one did not disappoint, either. GFA has released a modified version of their original beaver tail, making my Glock grip even more comfortable.

After installing my GFA and an obligatory piece of bicycle inner-tube I set out to the local range to begin breaking in my new handgun. I usually fire 1,000rds through any "social-purpose" firearm that is new to me. This ensures that the firearm has been properly broken in and builds my confidence that it is a reliable weapon. I started this break-in on March 9, 2012 and slightly surpassed my 1,000rd goal on June 3, 2012, reaching a total of 1,028rds. I fired the following amounts and types of 9mm ammunition during that time:
  • 506rds- 115gr Range Reload
  • 250rds- 115gr Tula
  • 200rds- 115gr Winchester White Box
  • 50rds- 115gr American Eagle
  • 22rds- 124gr +P Speer Gold Dot HP
I cleaned the firearm once during this period between the 300-400rd marks. The only issue I had was an ammuntion-related failure-to-fire with the 115gr Tula between the 100-200rd marks. The only modification besides the beaver tail that I added was a Pearce Grips grip plug. I'm really not worried about debris working its way into that opening. The reason I add these to my Glocks is that the contour aids in reloads much like a beveled magazine well on a 1911. The only modification I plan to make in the future is a good set of steel Ameri-Glo sights to replace the plastic factory sights. This pistol will mostly remain in my safe as a back-up to my primary G19, but may also serve as a lending item when taking friends and new shooters to the range. Hopefully nothing ever happens to my primary G19, but if it does I have full confidence that my new G19 will be up to the task.
 

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I've found my Glocks need a good break in period before they throw the brass consistently away from my forehead sometimes! And with around 950rds through my G19 and 2500rds out of my G21 they're still a long way away from being broken in yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The break-in is to ensure that the weapon will function in less than ideal circumstances (ie, lack of cleaning, lack of lubrication, cheap steel-cased ammo, etc). I feel confident that if it can operate properly like this then it will surely operate when I need it most and it has been regularly cleaned and lubed. If I notice anything seriously wrong during the break-in it does not become a social purpose gun unless I can trouble-shoot the problem and then put 1,000 trouble-free rounds through it.
 

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Respectfully, I'm going to play "devil's advocate"; first it's great your Glock functioned as intended & gained your confidence; you sure put it through its paces. But as a retired P.O. with extensive Glock training & usage, I'd strongly suggest that you don't solely rely on the pistol because lots of things can still go wrong with the best factory ammo. Or, in a tough spot by countless mishaps that will occur with the law of averages. That being said, put another 250 or so rounds through it with a friend handing you mags, partially loaded with dummy rounds, backwards loaded rounds, mismatched ammo and low loads that may not cyle or stovepipe or, create conditions that may stovepipe it. Then whenever possible; each time you shoot do some malfunction drills and have the same confidence in yourself as in the pistol. Sooner or later, what can happen surely will and that fine pistol will not operate as intended when you need it most unless, you take control of the malfunction. If I'm suggesting something you already do; I humbly apologize.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I totally agree. I personally train with my firearms (mainly my G19's) weekly and seek professional training as money and time allow. No doubt, being able to clear malfunctions (and knowing your firearm's manual of arms in general) is an important skill whether you're using an AK47 or a Hi-Point 9mm. Anything can break or malfunction for a variety of reasons. That being said, I still expect my firearms to perform to the level I spoke of above before I will consider using them as carry weapons. It's no different than requiring a LEO/Mil to perform to a ceratin level with his weapon before he is qualified to carry it on duty.
 

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I like your style: you have confidence in your personal capabilities & your weapon's system. I personally always enjoyed training and was fortunate that we had our own modern indoor range. Our training model focused on tactical shooting skills and yes, those malfunction drills; we had several Glock armorer's, excellent trainers and annually hosted the Glock school for the whole State. I got to shoot alot and have great confidence in the Glock; my personal models are the 22, 23 & 27 I'm a 40 cal guy. We did start off with the 19 and like most LE gravitated to the 40. I have so much confidence in the Glock 19 and my training that as soon as I could trade my issued high dollar Sig 9mm for a 19 did so, while doing PSD (personal security) duties in IRAQ (04-05). I might add that under extremely dirty conditions, I never had a single malfunction and that pistol stayed with me 24-7 for 365 days; she's probably still in service in some far away place.
 
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