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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a Colt Army Special .38 made 1911. Neatly engraved on the sideplate is "Louis LaBard C.P.D. Sept. 7 1921". The dealer just bought it from an old lady who brought it to his shop. I asked the dealer if he asked the lady about the inscription. He said he did not think of it, and he will not recontact her. I can not find anyone locally with that last name. I hold this gun, and think about its history. Unfortunately that history is now lost forever.
 

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Unfortunately that history is now lost forever.

Don't be so lazy. For 10 or 20 buxs you can join ancestry.com for a month and do some research. You have a name (and a bit of an unusual one at that), a time frame, and a possible police connection (the PD in CPD).

Piece of cake!!:)

John Gross
 

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I ran into the same kind of deal on a nice army special with carved steerhead ivories that belonged to a sheriff in NY (according to colt factory letter that I got after the purchase) and the shop that sold it on GB to me had no interest in giving any information and was very tight lipped about who it came from.

1. They are afraid they are going to get caught up in an argument between family members who say the seller had no right to sell the firearm. Potentially scrubbing the deal and any potential profits.

2. They are afraid that the new owner is going to talk to the previous owner and said previous owner will find out what new owner paid and the previous owner will hit the shop up to "share the wealth".

I hate the lost "history" also!
 

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Firearm Gun Revolver Trigger Starting pistol The history isn't lost, you just need to do some legwork! About a year ago, I purchased a CPD Merwin and Hulbert .38 for the shop. After some emailing to the police museum curator, we were able to pin down the officer it was issued to in 1887.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The only reason I can think of for an exact date inscribed is a retirement. The gun was 10 years old at that time, so that confuses it more.
 

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The best person to know would have been the seller, like the original poster said. Joining ancestery.com, doing "legwork" and all that is chasing red herrings when the lady could probably TELL you. I'd just go by the dealership on a different day, maybe talk to someone else. The dealer probably doesn't want to give out a private number. Leave your phone number and email, and ask them to give it to the seller with your questions. Then it's up to her if she gets in touch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The dealer is a one man shop. He does things his way, and hopes of contacting the seller are futile.
 

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Seriously, contact the PD, they will have information on the officer, and if an issue weapon, the unit of arms will most likely have records.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If I knew what the C stood for it would be easy. I do not even know what state it came from.
 

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I'm no Sherlock Holmes, but I would wager if it was sold by a little old lady to the local shop the C would be local.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm no Sherlock Holmes, but I would wager if it was sold by a little old lady to the local shop the C would be local.
No, in my state there was very little around 100 years ago, there were no police departments, only sheriffs offices. People move around a lot.
 

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I ran into the same kind of deal on a nice army special with carved steerhead ivories that belonged to a sheriff in NY (according to colt factory letter that I got after the purchase) and the shop that sold it on GB to me had no interest in giving any information and was very tight lipped about who it came from.

1. They are afraid they are going to get caught up in an argument between family members who say the seller had no right to sell the firearm. Potentially scrubbing the deal and any potential profits.

2. They are afraid that the new owner is going to talk to the previous owner and said previous owner will find out what new owner paid and the previous owner will hit the shop up to "share the wealth".

I hate the lost "history" also!

And a great gun it is. Thanks for doing the fine research. Excellent job Jim.





Wm. A. MacRae Sheriff
 

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That part of the work was fairly satisfying Cam but I wished the shop owner would have been willing to share with me who consigned the gun with his shop and we may have found out more about the sheriff and perhaps even gotten some more personal possessions to go with it.
 

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I know how you feel. I have an original 2" Police Positive Special that letters to P. Von Frantzius in 1927. The person I got it from bought it at Rock Island Auction in 2007. I have contacted them, but got no resopnse to a request to have the consignee contact me. I would love to know where it was for even a part of these 80 years.
 

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Sometimes, even tracking down the history of a gun can be disappointing. I bought an engraved "pre Detective Special" that was delivered to a "Sergent Blessing" of Charleston, WV in 1927. I researched the census records and discovered that Blessing was listed as a "City Policeman" and had a family. Through further searching, I found out when he died and who his survivors were. I found that his son had died just a few years before I began my research, and was survived by three children. I managed to locate the addresses of the three grandchildren and wrote them letters trying to obtain more information about their Grandfather. I never heard from any of them.

 

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I would start by contacting colt to find out where it was shipped to. In those days most likely to the department direct or local gun shop for him to pick up. Once you have established a city or town where it has arrived to then you search what police dept. starts with a c in that area. Chicago, Cleavland? what ever. You can then contact the historian from that department with the name and they may provide you with what you need. If that doesn't work because they don't want to give you the time of day, you can always hit the computer by typing his name and see what pops up. I purchased a gun which had a name and the dept. on it which made the search a bit easy but I didn't even get to that because there was a member on this board who was able to get all the info on this guy and his help was greatly appreciated.
 

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The gun was given to this guy when he was a patrolman and he retired as a Deputy Chief.
 

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I would definately agree with the ancestry thing. Just a quick search on it without actually creating an account yielded some interesting results.
 
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