Colt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,632 Posts
Brownells sells a slow rust blue that really works well. You can do it on you kitchen stove, It's a process that they used for a lot of early guns like Lugers etc. It's a lot more durable than hot salt bluing. Here's a Mauser I did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,382 Posts
The niter blue used by the old gun companies was a 10/1 mixture of potassium nitrate and black oxide of manganese heated to 800 degrees F. at which the mixture had become molten. The parts were dipped in the mixture until the proper color was achieved. The higher the polish the more peacock the blue.

The rust blue mentioned above is a very durable blue. Until about 1930 the two bluing methods were either heat or rust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
I have done some rust blueing with a product from Laurel Mountain Forge, available from Brownells, with outstanding results. As with any finishing, the metal preparation is the key.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,981 Posts
well the video made me laugh how he did it...but shockingly it looked quite nice in the end....i would never want to do this inside...but i am interested for sure....thank u for sharing it....God Bless,John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,302 Posts
I have a old shooter thumb buster- needs a tune up and a re-blue job, those videos were fun to watch gave me some ideas-Not for me, I can't fix squat, but after watching that- it seems like it would be pretty easy to set up a commercial re-blue shop out in the boondock and make some money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,800 Posts
You could call it 'Bubba's'...

Proper refinishing - whether done by an individual or by a firm - requires serious metal preparation - the job's only as good as the work put into the piece prior to it hitting the tanks.

That's why prices are what they are and also why restoration shops charge what they do - the metal prep has to be flawless, and if one can't do that sort of work, then they lump themselves with all those other guys who have had small shops and zero training.

Gone are the days when customers were satisfied with a shiny dark finish - they're more in tune with what the piece 'should' look like and that's what they demand, since today - 'everything' is looked at as being collectable and thus valuable.
 

·
Forum Friend
Joined
·
5,858 Posts
As dogface says, proper metal prep is necessary to a good refinish job. With not a lot of experience I've done some & consider it a tedious process --



Blued with Belgian Blue, six or more treatments to get it dark enuf. Degrease, boil part in water, swab on B-B, forms a quick rust you take off with fine steel wool then boil again. Repeating each time gets it a little darker. Doing each revolver part takes a few hours. Positive factor is I did it in my kitchen.



This partial refinish due rust damage in places on a like-new gun, I did with Brownell's Oxpho Blue after a 1500 grit prep with no buffing. Hard to tell where reblue meets tha original ---->
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,333 Posts
If you're seriously considering doing this, buy a cheap turkey fryer and some bluing salts from Brownell's. You can mix your own salts, but that's another story.
As stated above, the prep is the key. And yes, there is a learning curve. And this is NOT a kitchen process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,499 Posts
Also make sure to buy a good apron (leather or heavy rubber), heavy long sleeve gloves and a face shield. It's definitely not a kitchen process, especially if you're married. What the guy is doing is downright dangerous in a lot of different ways, and it just goes to show that you should be very sceptical to gunsmithing shown on YouTube.
 

·
Forum Friend
Joined
·
5,858 Posts
Just so we understand --- I used my Belgian Blue in my kitchen, a simple, tedious, relatively clean job with no need for special care & very little clean up afterward. OTHER bluing chemicals are known to be hazardous & should be handled accordingly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,382 Posts
115 year old rust blue. It wears and ages well. The "strawed" small parts didn't lend themselves well to rust bluing, so DWM colored them with heat much the same way as the fire blued parts were done, but they were pulled from the heat just as they reached the straw color just before turning blue.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,187 Posts
I almost exclusively use Belgian Blue for frames and barrels, and flame blue/brown/or straw the small screws and parts like JohnnyP states. With the flame you can get straw or blue depending upon where you stop, and if you need a blackish brown on a non heat treat critical part, simply squirt cutting oil on the hot screw head and burn off the oil in a flame. The video shows nitre bluing and I would certainly be concerned with the heat treat being ruined. Some metal tempering is done as low as 400 degrees depending upon alloy, if this stuff is around +600 degrees I would be careful. The amazing thing is he doesnt even have a thermometer in his melt....then states "it may need to be hotter to blue faster"....wow. I really would NEVER do this on a frame. My 2 cents.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top