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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody, can anyone tell me exactly where to look for damage to my fire arm from using to light of a recoil spring and ammo loaded to high? Also when I purchased my GOLD CUP NATIONAL MATCH MK IV SERIES 8O it only came with one spring so I don't know if it is the light one or the heavier one is there any way to tell? Thinking about buying a new set just to be safe, any help or info would be greatly appreciated ! THANKS !
 

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If the recoil spring is too light and/or the load is too strong, ejected brass will fling a great distance from the gun. If the spring is too heavy and/or the load too light, the case will barely dribble out of the port, if it makes it out at all. This is actually how you tell your spring is losing strength and needs to be replaced under normal use. Normal ejection for full loads should eject 8-12 feet before it hits the ground. If it does that when new, then when it reaches 15+ feet, it's time to replace the spring.

Standard 1911 recoil springs should go between 16 and 18½ pounds. Target springs will go 10-12 pounds. Start with a 16 pound new spring, observe the ejection pattern, and adjust weight as needed. For standard (non +P) loads, that should work fine.

Buck
 

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The Gold Cup usually shipped with two springs, one for standard load "hard ball" and one for light Mid-range Target loads using 185 grain bullets.

The standard spring is used for most standard full charge ammo. This spring is a 16 pound spring and is used for both the Government Model and Gold Cup.
If you want to shoot ammo hotter then 800 feet per second, you can go up to 17 or even 18 pounds, depending on the load.

For actual target shooting, the Gold Cup was usually used with what is known as "Mid-Range" ammo, or ammo loaded in the light mid range of the loading data, which is usually the most accurate loads. Target ammo was usually hand loaded with 185 grain semi-wadcutter lead bullets.
For Target use the stock Gold Cup light spring was 14 pounds. However, you need to match the spring to the load, as haggis posted above.

Damage from shooting standard load ammo with the light spring is not something that you'd see if you only shot a little. Damage usually is cumulative and takes some use before it's really noticeable, unless you were shooting hot ammo.
Damage might include battering or cracks in the rear of the barrel, battering or "flanging" (sharp edges of metal pulled up on the front of the lugs) of the locking lugs of the barrel or slide, cracking of the frame around the slide stop hole or at the rear of the recoil spring tunnel, cracked or excessively battered recoil spring guide.
 

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For people who worry about such things and who have several Govt models, there is a tool for measuring spring tension. I believe I got mine from Brownells. For someone with a single pistol, it would cost less than the tool to buy a new spring in the desired weight.
 

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Being the cheap..., err, frugal:rolleyes: Scotsman that I am, I built a device to measure recoil spring weight from about a dollar's worth of scrap parts and a 0-25 pound spring scale that I already had.

Buck
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's exactly what I wanted to know dfariswheel Thank You sir I really appreciate it my firearm was bought used and only had one spring and I just wondered if it had been abused with heavy loads where to look !
 
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