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I am trying to learn to use a red dot sight. Since I do not have any experience with a red dot sight, I had it sighted in at 25/100 yards before taking delivery. It was also sighted in at 25 yards with the iron sights. Where do I place the red dot, should it lay on top of the front sight? Any advice will be appreciated. If you have seen any of my previous posts, you will know that I am trying to learn to use long guns after years of pistols, revolvers, and shot guns.
 

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With long guns and red dot sights, you have to zero the iron sights separate from the red dot sight.

I usually zero at 50/ 200 yards my carbine's iron and red dot sight.

You could either zero your iron sights first or even the red dot first, as long as you zero them separately.

I picked the 50/ 200 yards zero because even at 100 yards my groupings should be only about a couple of inches high of the bulls eye.

Even if I have to shoot at longer 300 yards which is about the maximum of my carbine range I would just aim about 5 to 6 inches higher.

When using the red dot sight, don't worry where the iron sight is at, even if your red dot is not centered on your field of view it would still hit where your red dot is aimed.

If your red dot failed then use your iron sight, there are two ways the optic could be mounted, either absolute (means the red dot and the top of the front sight is at the center of the optic lens) or lower 1/3 co-witness.

The lower 1/3 co-witness the mount is a little higher and the front sight is only visible at the lower 1/3 of the lens (field of view).

Picking which one to use absolute or 1/3 lower co-witness is a personal preference.

Some shooters prefer the absolute co-witness because they want the front sight at the center of the field of view.

Some like myself prefers the 1/3 lower co-witness because in some shooting positions like bending down, shooting sideways, etc, it's hard to get a perfect face contact with the buttstock all the time, with the optic a little higher it is easier to see the red dot even if the cheek is not touching the buttstock.

I've been using Aimpoint red dot since 1989 mainly on my Colt 1911 .45 pistol for target practice, then in 2005 I started to use it on my carbines.
 
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With long guns and red dot sights, you have to zero the iron sights separate from the red dot sight.

I usually zero at 50/ 200 yards my carbine's iron and red dot sight.

You could either zero your iron sights first or even the red dot first, as long as you zero them separately.

I picked the 50/ 200 yards zero because even at 100 yards my groupings should be only about a couple of inches high of the bulls eye.

Even if I have to shoot at longer 300 yards which is about the maximum of my carbine range I would just aim about 5 to 6 inches higher.

When using the red dot sight, don't worry where the iron sight is at, even if your red dot is not centered on your field of view it would still hit where your red dot is aimed.

If your red dot failed then use your iron sight, there are two ways the optic could be mounted, either absolute (means the red dot and the top of the front sight is at the center of the optic lens) or lower 1/3 co-witness.

The lower 1/3 co-witness the mount is a little higher and the front sight is only visible at the lower 1/3 of the lens (field of view).

Picking which one to use absolute or 1/3 lower co-witness is a personal preference.

Some shooters prefer the absolute co-witness because they want the front sight at the center of the field of view.

Some like myself prefers the 1/3 lower co-witness because in some shooting positions like bending down, shooting sideways, etc, it's hard to get a perfect face contact with the buttstock all the time, with the optic a little higher it is easier to see the red dot even if the cheek is not touching the buttstock.

I've been using Aimpoint red dot since 1989 mainly on my Colt 1911 .45 pistol for target practice, then in 2005 I started to use it on my carbines.

+1
 

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It really depends on the sight you had installed and whether or not it is parallax-free. This would be in the documentation with the sight.

If it is parallax-free, then the dot should be "on target" whether you align it at the top, bottom, left or right within the sight window. Your eye does not have to be centered behind the sight, and the dot does not have to be centered either. And yes, the iron sights would be ignored.

Also, if it's a non-magnifying sight, keep both eyes open.
 

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My buddy has extensive experience with electric sights and his method is to sight the rifle in using the iron sights.
He uses the absolute co-witness so the iron sights and dot are in a straight alignment with each other.

Once the iron sights are sighted in mount the electric sight and adjust until the dot or reticle is in alignment with the iron sights, then actually shoot to get final targeting.
This makes it a little faster and easier to get targeted with a minimum of ammo and time.
 
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