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This would tend to be done by relying on a variety/quantity of the same Screw, in order to elect the one which most nearly co-responds to the alignment one is after.

Trying to arrive at a 'Regulation' using whatever Screws happen to be on something, is another matter, and, basically, has no practical solution I know of.

One could weld up a Screw Slot, using a compatible or like-same Alloy, grind, shape, etc, re-Temper, and, then, re-Cut the Screw Slot, and polish and re-Finish the Screw, to establish the Alignment one is after ( but, is that a practical solution? I don't know...maybe, if one is determined enough! )


Whether a Screw ( in usual function of going into a Threaded Hole where the 'hole' does not rotate ) goes back with the same Slot-Alignment it had before being un-screwed - if it is tight to begin with, and tight when re-installed, then "Yes".

If not, then something is wrong.


One c-o-u-l-d use very very thin 'Shim Washers' under some kinds of Screws, in order to regulate how far 'in' the Screw Head ends up being when the Screw is tight....this would allow the Screw Slot to be 'Regulated' in it's final positioning, but, the Screw Head would end up possibly too proud or too high...where, one could reduce the thickness of the Screw Head, to make it less tall, and, then, re-Cut the Screw Slot if need be, to be deep enough.


This would not be considered a good Engineering Practice though, or, would be frowned upon by anyone of good Engineering Practice.
 

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Old gunsmiths use paper washers to index the screws. You can make them from craft paper. They actually work well. Just put one in at a time and most importantly use the correct screw driver. They also ground the screwdriver to fit the screw.
 

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Regulating the positions of the Slots in Countersunk Wood Screws, is very different than regulating the position of the Slots, in Capstan Head or other Machine Screws as they tend to be found in/on Revolvers.


The article shows some pretty crude methods and poor results of the author, also.

A far better way to do it ( with Countersunk Wood Screws ) is to use a Countersink, get everyone aligned and slightly proud, then File down the 'proud' so all are flush with the Hinge.


With Ornamental Cast Bronze or Iron Hinges having more or less Bas Relief motives or designs, ( which are not dead flat ) as had once been the fashion for use on Doors of Homes or other Buildings, one would instead, aim for achieving the align, while simultaneously achieving a uniform depth or flush-ness, which did not rely on subsequent filing of the Head's tops.


The Articles shows the poor results of the Author reducing the Countersunk Screw Head's countersunk area, which leaved gaps then, in how the Screw Head fits the Countersunk Hole.

A very poor method.

As would be the use of 'EPOXY' to fill such 'gaps'.

Once used to it, ( with Countersunk Wood Screws anyway ) and with doing it properly, none of this is as difficult or tedious as it may sound.
 

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I cannot help but think that the old time smiths just fit the screw as needed. What I mean is that the screw was threaded into position and then minute amounts on material was removed to align or regulate the screws.

In the ole days when things were hand fit positive results were more important than time, because the customer was paying for what he or she wanted.

Growing up working on yachts thats the way things were years ago. No more just get it done is the only thing that matters now.

And yes it is much easier to regulate wood screws because they can be tightened a bit more or backed out slightly and not fall out, whereas a machine screw (especially on a firearm) needs to be snugged up so it will not loosen up.
 

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I cannot help but think that the old time smiths just fit the screw as needed.

There were very few, VERY few kinds or classes of Work, where 'Regulated' Screw Slots were called for.

It was never a common thing to do.


What I mean is that the screw was threaded into position and then minute amounts on material was removed to align or regulate the screws.
Material removed from what?


In the ole days when things were hand fit positive results were more important than time, because the customer was paying for what he or she wanted.
No, time was 'Money" since before Babylon, and it was certainly so in the US in the 19th Century.

Artisans who survived and who did so doing 'Good Work', knew how to do things 'once, right and as fast' as possible.

Alacrity was a primary accomplishment for any thing, period.

Otherwise, one starved or was evicted or fired...or one was watching Work which payed three times as much, not getting done, as one fussed to immodest heights of slowness, with some triviality or detail. No one with any sense worked that way then, or, since, unless maybe as a 'Hobbiest'.

One learns to do 'difficult' complex things, forthrightly...in order to have pride, and in order TO survive.


Growing up working on yachts thats the way things were years ago. No more just get it done is the only thing that matters now.
Some parallels there maybe, but, likely, not much.

I have been around Yacht and Boat Building, and the operatives were not very able or fast or efficient or intelligent or clever, and, they had naïve 'rich' credulous customers to compliment their ways.

This is not the measure of any other 'reality', than the one is happens to be about.


And yes it is much easier to regulate wood screws because they can be tightened a bit more or backed out slightly and not fall out, whereas a machine screw (especially on a firearm) needs to be snugged up so it will not loosen up.
No, not in any 'Good Work' anyway ( just loosen or tighten till you get the slot where you want it ).

How tight is "tight", there is a little, not much, but a very "little" room there, whether for a Wood Screw or a Machine Screw...where it is 'Tight' but could be a tiny bit tighter...but that is NOT a viable or respected method of attaining the result.
 

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There were very few, VERY few kinds or classes of Work, where 'Regulated' Screw Slots were called for.
It was never a common thing to do.
At one time it was more common than you think it was!

Material removed from what?
I should have been a bit more specific here rather than make a generalized comment; Material removed from the underside of the screw head or in the counterbored or countersunk recess.

No, time was 'Money" since before Babylon, and it was certainly so in the US in the 19th Century.

Artisans who survived and who did so doing 'Good Work', knew how to do things 'once, right and as fast' as possible.

Alacrity was a primary accomplishment for any thing, period.

Otherwise, one starved or was evicted or fired...or one was watching Work which payed three times as much, not getting done, as one fussed to immodest heights of slowness, with some triviality or detail. No one with any sense worked that way then, or, since, unless maybe as a 'Hobbiest'.

One learns to do 'difficult' complex things, forthrightly...in order to have pride, and in order TO survive.
Quality custom work required time and skill, and a "one of" product certainly took more time than a production item. And even "artisans" made mistakes.

Some parallels there maybe, but, likely, not much.

I have been around Yacht and Boat Building, and the operatives were not very able or fast or efficient or intelligent or clever, and, they had naïve 'rich' credulous customers to compliment their ways.

This is not the measure of any other 'reality', than the one is happens to be about.
This comment is nothing but a disparaging insult to the legions of craftsman that did this work!

No, not in any 'Good Work' anyway ( just loosen or tighten till you get the slot where you want it ).

How tight is "tight", there is a little, not much, but a very "little" room there, whether for a Wood Screw or a Machine Screw...where it is 'Tight' but could be a tiny bit tighter...but that is NOT a viable or respected method of attaining the result.
Before the mass manufacturing of the junkie screws available today, very good results could be attained as the screws were more consistent. Usually requiring a modest 1/4 to 1/2 turn, and sometimes swapping out screws until the proper results were achieved.

FWIW: please see "Gunsmithing" by Roy Dunlap; Stackpole Books; Copyright 1963; pages 586-7.
Several paragraphs about screw alignment on custom rifles, a bit too much to copy, and would be an infringment on any copyright.
 

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cHi kenhwind,

Indeed, the era of the finely made mass-produced, Automatic Screw Machine 'cut' Steel Screw, is long gone now.

Present day Wood Screws, are barely even possible to find, unless Cad or Zink plates, and, poorly made, 'rolled threads', let alone finding them Slotted ( instead of 'Philips' )

Probably they are all made in third world settings now, by people who's cultures at this stage, have no capacity to fathom or to wish to emulate to any depth of understanding or reason, what 'quality' would be. endless peons who just need-a-job, and endless corporate stockholders anxious only about the next fiscal quarter.


Maybe there was an ambiguity or confusion in the 'Yacht' reference - you mentioned present day Yacht building, and, I responded to that.

( Hard to generalize in a few sentences, but, if you wanted, show me some images of present day Yacht Woodworking which is not clumsy, crude, garish, naïve, and more or less 'bad'. I will gladly concede then that some is not that way. )

Then, you relay how I am disparaging those who used to do that Work ( in the past).

Tacit 'Standards' of a Century ago, bear no resemblance to those of to-day.''Housewright wise, Boatwright wise. Not usually, anyway.

Or, the expensive Pleasure Boat Work ( regardless of cost ) I was seeing in the 1980s anyway, did not impress me, even if it impressed the naïve people who were paying for it.


The operatives/craftsmen were not very capable or good...and they did not know how to solve technical details of design or execution. They did not have the Tooling or the know-how for operating the Tooling, to solve many sorts of technical or design problems. Their Tools were all from Harbor Freight or 'Sears', and, on and on...elected because that WAS the limits of their reach.

One sees the same in many other contexts of Work.

It was on par with those 'Custom' 1970s 'Van' interiors - cheap, silly, garish, crude, gee-gaw 'Plunge-Router' stuff.
 

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On a side note: Christopher Spencer, famed inventor if the Spencer carbine, conceived the first automatic screw machine in 1873.
 

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The English custom gun maker method was to install a screw with a thicker head with a shallow slot, then once tightly in place, they'd mark a new slot and hand file a slot that perfectly aligned with the barrel.

Whether a screw will align once removed depends on how tightly you re-install it.
If you put a screw or bolt in a threaded hole and put index marks on the head and the part it's screwed in, then remove it and re-install it, you can force the screw or bolt to screw in farther by torquing it tighter.
This mates the threads snugger and allows it to screw in a little farther.
By loosening and tightening the screw you can force it to screw in farther and farther each time until it strips.

As long as you don't over tighten the screw it will index again IN METAL. In wood, shrinking or expansion of the wood or torquing the screw tighter will allow it to screw in farther or not far enough to align.

This mating of the threads and compression of the parts is why once a revolver or rifle barrel torque is broken and the barrel removed it will no longer perfectly align when re-installed with enough torque to prevent it vibrating loose.
 
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