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While I'm sure there is some "panic" buying I think the pandemic had much more to do with it. While ammunition makers (and components) might have been essential business for government and military purchases I'm also sure they had a lot of people staying home sick. I really doubt that "panic buying" created a new rush of reloaders that emptied out the manufacturing lines for dies and other reloading tools, but you still can't find them online. I think more of a problem staffing those assembly lines.
 

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Tomato, tomaahto.
I'm fat with everything I may need. And when stuff comes back around, I'll get fatter.
It wasn't that long ago when LGS had to ration primers if they had any at all.
There were places where there were no primers to be had. Zip, zero, nada.
Seems to me, I can recall a couple times when this sillyness caused great consternation among true shooter types.
 

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I sure don't see any emergency. Unfair pricing? If you don't think it is fair, why not buy some place else?

5000 Winchester pistol primers? Large or small. $750 delivered.
 

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:) That is called a free market arms length transaction between 2 willing and equally informed buyers and sellers. For those of you who have a 401k for example the odds are you are invested either directly or indirectly in the Stock Market. Is this gouging when a price of a stock say doubles in the span of 30 days? Hmmmmm
I totally agree. This happens every couple years and people act all shocked and surprised every time. If you got caught short handed this time you only have yourself to blame unless you are brand new to all of this.

I have been putting ammo for sale to the highest bidder on GB and have been making a killing. I still have 5000 rounds of 9mm to sell.

As a reminder if Trump wins the prices will come back down. Load up then so you don’t come back 3 years later all surprised, shocked and caught off guard yet again.
 

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I had some overstock of 32 acp on GBkr for $15.00 for a box of 50 earlier in the year and it just sat there, now I'm holding on to it.
 

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In the school of economics that I was taught, it is called the 'opportunity cost' of things both material and immaterial. When people desire something, they pay for it. The more they desire it, the more they will pay. This applies even to immaterial things such as, say, counseling. In times of personal crisis resulting from some emergency, securing an appointment with a counselor or psychotherapist is difficult - too many people lining up at too few counselor's offices. You cannot simply churn out more counselors in a hurry, as that takes time. Counselor appointments are scarce.

It is the same but different with physical things - especially those things which pertain to our survival, professions, daily life, hobbies and even our fears. Physical objects that are directly or indirectly related to our survival and self defense - either from starvation (food) infection (Lysol) or invasion (home and personal security). The reverse side of the coin might be called "supply gouging" as sellers cannot obtain their wares at any cost. It all revolves around the concept of scarcity. We see that different oxen are being gored.

Consider salt. It's everywhere on this earth. The price of salt did not (generally) rise in response to covid or civil violence. There is generally plenty for everyone and salt is not as subject to the shortages we see in materials and products which are scarce. In times of crisis, scarcity abounds due to uncertainty and "binge buying." "Temporarily out of stock" and "Sold out" are commonly seen. We we able to predict the outcome of future events, we could rest assured that we had enough on hand and would not waste our resources (money) on excess goods.

Scarcirty comes and goes. There are still more than enough "pet rocks" for the market. No one wants them - demand for pet rocks died down decades ago - and this points to the fickle nature of the human being. The very concept is absolutely ludicrous, but millions bought them and millions were made by the producers at very low cost to them. Rocks are like salt in that regard, but how to increase demand for salt? Bullets, cases, primers, ammo fall far outside of the salt category.

What to make of all this? We cannot fish when the tide is out, but we can beach comb or dig clams to our hearts desire. When tide is in, we quickly switch to fishing. Scarcity, like tides, is temporary and directs our behavior. Those who appear to be hoarders in good times are likewise seen as prudent or prophetic in times of scarcity. Patience will get us through and patience is what we often lack.

A large cup's worth of French roast thought here.
 

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po18guy, that dissertation may have caused a minor injury to my brain. I liked it, but I think I’ll have a drink, now. . .
I don't know whether it will make more sense with coffee or with whisky. Probably with whisky, but IME more argumentation generally ensues.

On a societal scale, it points to the fact that there are two things woefully lacking in schooling today: critical thinking and economic theory.
 
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Slightly off topic but related. I was in Costco the other day and they had 16 double stacked pallets of toilet paper. What was unusual was the location they were in and that the regular toilet paper location was full too. My wife thinks it’s pre planning for November 4th, and I stopped doubting women’s intuition years ago.
 

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Slightly off topic but related. I was in Costco the other day and they had 16 double stacked pallets of toilet paper. What was unusual was the location they were in and that the regular toilet paper location was full too. My wife thinks it pre planning for November 4th, and I stopped doubting women’s intuition years ago.
Still on topic, which is the idea of scarcity and the prices it brings. If prices cannot rise, commodities dry up. In the grocery store, I would rather grumble about high prices than about empty shelves.
 
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Discussion Starter #35
Still on topic, which is the idea of scarcity and the prices it brings. If prices cannot rise, commodities dry up. In the grocery store, I would rather grumble about high prices than about empty shelves.
Well in this case, the shelves are empty and the prices are through the roof.
 

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That is a very good point.
Vic
 
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Well in this case, the shelves are empty and the prices are through the roof.
Scarcity. Applying monetarist economic theory, the prices were not high enough. As sad and counterintuitive as that is, at $100/box, there would be ammo available. Far as I know the 9mm ball for 800$/1000 is still avaiable.
 
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po18
I've kinda been going along with your wisdom but I'm thinking you may have entered the Twilight Zone. 😁
Vic
 
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