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I recently acquired an Army Special in 41 Long Colt. I have the dies and brass, but have been unable to find any data on bullet, charge, etc. Can anybody help?
 

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Your best bet, is to visit a gun show, and pick up a copy of an old Lyman loading manual. I picked up a couple when I ventured into 41LC reloading, and some other tinkering. What pistol powders, and bullet weight (heeled or HB?), do you have available, and maybe I can give you a safe load to get you started.
 

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White Eagle. Your best bet is to get a copy of "Handloader" magazine,Dec.1993 issue #196.from WolfePublishingCompany in Arizona. No website,but phone # is (520)445-7810. Great article on the .41 Colt. There are many variables in case sizes for heeled & hollow based bullets. Cases available now from Starline & several commercial casters have the bullets in stock. A little expensive,but you will feel a sense of shooting "something different" Accuracy is very good,with proper loads. I have a .41 Army Special also & a Single Action .41. Good luck! Bud
 

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I can probably help you with information on the powder charge, but I'll need to know the details: what sort of bullet you plan to shoot (heel or hollow base), the weight of the bullet, the length of the case you intend to use, the overall length of the cartridge you wish to load etc.

Bob
 

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I don't reload for the .41 Long Colt, but I do reload for the .32 Long Colt.
A couple of years ago, I found the old factory recipe for the lubricant used on outside-lubricated bullets.
This was in a 1943 American Rifleman article on bullet lubrication.
The recipe is:
1 part paraffin
1 part tallow
1/2 part beeswax
All measures are by weight, not volume.

I use canning paraffin, found at the grocery store, and mutton tallow sold by Dixie Gun Works.
This creates a very good black powder lubricant. It is particularly good to soak felt wads in, such as those used in cap and ball revolvers. The addition of paraffin stiffens the wad and helps scrape out fouling.
To make a batch of lubricant, I use a kitchen scale to weigh out:
200 grams of mutton tallow
200 grams of paraffin
100 grams of beeswax
Then, I place all ingredients in a quart Mason jar. Place the jar into three or four inches of boiling water. This creates a double-boiler effect, the safest way to melt waxes and greases.
When all ingredients are melted, stir well with a clean stick or disposable chopstick.
Allow to cool at room temperature. Hastening cooling by placing in the refrigerator may cause the ingredients to separate.
When cool and hardened, screw the jar lid down tight and store in a cool, dry place.
This is also an excellent bullet lubricant for cast bullets in black powder cartridges. It very much resembles commercially available lubricants made for this purpose.
To use with heeled bullets:
Place a clean tuna can in a small saucepan with about an inch or boiling or near-boiling water.
Add the lubricant until the can is at least half full of melted lubricant.
Up-end the cartridge and place the naked lead bullet into the melted lubricant up to where the bullet meets the brass case neck.
You will see a ring of lubricant held aback by the surface tension. Suddenly, that surface tension disappears and the lubricant will rush in all the way around the bullet.
At this point, you know that the bullet is at or near the temperature of the lubricant. This is the time to remove the cartridge and stand it upright on a sheet of wax paper to cool.
If you remove the cartridge before the bullet warms enough, you'll get a big glob of lubricant on the bullet. No problem, just return it to the lubricant and hold it in there a little longer.
I keep my outside-lubricated cartridges in a plastic cartridge box made by MTM, bullet down.
If it's very hot outdoors, you may wish to transport such ammunition to the range in a cooler.
Now, here's the nifty part --- remember the tuna can?
Well, snap a plastic pet food cover over it, place it in a Zip-Loc bag, and store it where it's cool and dry.
Next time you need to melt some lubricant for heeled bullets or felt wads or whatever, the tuna can will be ready.
In fact, I use a number of such cans and keep my felt wads of different caliber in them all the time. Cans and snap-tops are cheap.
This authentic bullet lubricant recipe was old when printed in the 1943 American Rifleman. It's very effective with black powder. I've even used it experimentally in my .357 Magnum with hard-cast lead loads up to about 1,200 feet per second, successfully.
However, it's not very resistant to high temperatures so ammo and wads should be kept in the shade or cooler.
By the way, those MTM boxes can get mighty filthy with black powder and outside lubricated bullets. After a time, I turn it upside down on the top rack of my dishwasher. Comes out clean as a whistle.
 

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White Eagle,
My apologies. It seems we all missed the obvious fact that the reason for your question is, you don't have any of this info we keep asking you about. If you have access to a fax machine, e-mail me the fax number, and I'll copy the .41LC data from my old Lyman manuals, and fax it directly to you. Then, you'll have all the dimensions, and can make your own bullet, and powder choices. Original bullet molds exist, but they're scarce. I lucked out, and found original Ideal hollow base, and heeled molds, at an OGCA show. Prior to that, I was going to order them from a company called Rapeen(?) or something like that. Perhaps another forum member recalls the exact name, and how it's actually spelled. This was several years ago.
 
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