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This is a super nice Remington Double Derringer. As you can see it is nickel with fire blue parts. All of these are .41 caliber. According to the Remington letter it was made sometime between 1988-1910. The numbers on these pistols were not serial numbers they were batch numbers. You can get a range of the year of manufacture based on the barrel address.
700232

700233

700234

700235

700236
 

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When I first opened this post and saw the first picture of the derringer I thought someone was finally making a repro Remington derringer. Imagine my shock that it was an original finished gun! One of my favorites! Outstanding! Tom
 

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Very Nice Remington Derringers, especially with the Nickel Finish! Condition! Wow! Mine is no so nice, but it is one of the earliest ones made without the extractor. This one was made in 1866 and is the oldest firearms that I own. Jackson

700303
700304
 

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This is a super nice Remington Double Derringer. As you can see it is nickel with fire blue parts. All of these are .41 caliber. According to the Remington letter it was made sometime between 1988-1910. The numbers on these pistols were not serial numbers they were batch numbers. You can get a range of the year of manufacture based on the barrel address.
View attachment 700232
View attachment 700233
View attachment 700234
View attachment 700235
View attachment 700236
An extremely nice Remington double derringer! Due to a lack of a period after the "Y" in "N. Y", your manufacture date can possibly be narrowed down a bit.
 

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[/QUOTE]

This Remington 41 RF Derringer is a 3rd Model made generally between 1888 and 1912, but the particular italic address style used on this one narrows the manufacture to 1890-98. The gun is now an awful sight, having been abused, and maybe even lost and dug up once or twice! But it has a little history.

My grandfather's older brother, Albert Neumann, was gunned down in Wootan Wells, TX on Dec 27, 1911. The Clark family had accused Albert of over-fencing his ranch property. The issue heated up over a period of time, and on that freezing cold day two Clark brothers approached Albert, with one shooting and the other doing the cutting with a knife. A trial was held in early 1912, and during the court time, my grandfather kept this derringer in his pocket, fearing that the Clarks might try to kill him too.

What happened to Wootan Wells? This had been a hot mineral wells resort city, but Marlin to the north became the more desireable spot for hot baths. The last hotel burned in 1917. Until about 15 years ago the site was an elevated place east of Hwy 6, not far from Bremond, TX. When Hwy 6 was widened, even that hill dissapeared.
 

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Absolutely Stunning Randy !!

Damn...Now I Want One !!




My piss poor pot metal rendition...in .22 Magnum...purchased in 1989 for $75 OTD ( PA State Tax / NICS included ) while awaiting pickup of my PA Deer Hunting License at a local Edelman's Sporting Goods...long since shuttered because the ATF found that more guns went out the back door than the front.

Hey...every gun has a story.

.
 

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[/QUOTE]

This example of a Remington O/U Derringer came in its original pipe case. The two line address applied to the top of the barrel flat is generally recognized as dating between 1867 and 1887. The thick pearl grips are factory original. Period sales flyers and catalogs list pearl grips as an option for this firearm at least during the period of 1870-1877.
 

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WoW...

Ya know...I've worked one...most times two jobs from the time I was a paperboy around 8 until retirement at 53.5 officially...with other odd jobs under the table...and I did pretty well.

But... Ya'll must be robbin' banks, never had a kid in college, and definitely never had an ex-wife to afford the all the toys you guys show here !!

Just Sayin'...!!

.
 

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Interesting that the later guns exhibit the plum colored frame. :unsure:
That plum-colored frame may be an indication that Remington made a change from cast iron to an alloy steel. I have a 1935 S&W Hand Ejector in 44 Spcl that was reblued long ago for the sheriff who once owned it. Everything blued, except for the plum-colored cylinder. See pictures of this Smith & Wesson.

Remington "cut corners" (costs) by using gray cast iron for frames. This is true of the New Model Army 44 percussion, and the Models 1875, 1888, and 1890 Single Actions, to name a few. With gray cast iron, the finish is not going to be that shiny, and maybe that is the real reason why so many Remington cartridge guns are nickeled.

Gray cast iron is highly machinable, as the chips are small and break away from a cutting tool readily. Gray cast iron is about 2% carbon, and that carbon leaves many small lenses throughout the iron matrix. These lenses produce the "notch effect" on strength, and promote fracture. Gray cast iron has good compressive strength, but poor tensile strength. One would never want to make a barrel or cylinder from it. What I have said here might irk a purist Remington collector, but it is the truth.
 

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