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Interesting that the later guns exhibit the plum colored frame. :unsure:
As stated earlier, Remington "cut corners" (costs) by using gray cast iron for frames. This is true of the New Model Army 44 percussion. Another point to be made is that by 1864 Colt was losing government sales to the Remington New Model Army 44 percussion, because the latter product was (1) Lower cost, and (2) The government was beginning to insist on having a solid frame.
 

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That plum-colored frame may be an indication that Remington made a change from cast iron to an alloy steel. I have a 1935 S&W Hand Ejector in 44 Spcl that was reblued long ago for the sheriff who once owned it. Everything blued, except for the plum-colored cylinder. See pictures of this Smith & Wesson.

Remington "cut corners" (costs) by using gray cast iron for frames. This is true of the New Model Army 44 percussion, and the Models 1875, 1888, and 1890 Single Actions, to name a few. With gray cast iron, the finish is not going to be that shiny, and maybe that is the real reason why so many Remington cartridge guns are nickeled.

Gray cast iron is highly machinable, as the chips are small and break away from a cutting tool readily. Gray cast iron is about 2% carbon, and that carbon leaves many small lenses throughout the iron matrix. These lenses produce the "notch effect" on strength, and promote fracture. Gray cast iron has good compressive strength, but poor tensile strength. One would never want to make a barrel or cylinder from it. What I have said here might irk a purist Remington collector, but it is the truth.
Because Remington used Gray Cast Iron on frames, the finished surfaces weren't smooth in preparation for a bright blue. Look at the machining scratches left on this Remington M1875 frame in 44 Rem caliber. I've seen this low quality of work on many Rem Double Derringers too. Being on a softer iron surface, the blue doesn't last as long either.
 

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Gunshow maybe 30 yrs ago. Kid walks in with his grandfather's Rem 41, in the box. Sold it to a guy walking the floor. I had a win mod 12 12 ga on the table for $400 and the guy with the Rem 41 wanted a win 12 pump.



The bottom of the box has hand written pencil note that took me YEARS to decipher. It says Last Derringer. I then thought cool, I have the last Rem Derringer that was made. Later I thought hmm, the last one in the store ! I added the stag grips and had ivory grips made for it. Still have the original HR grips.

Charlie
 

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Gunshow maybe 30 yrs ago. Kid walks in with his grandfather's Rem 41, in the box. Sold it to a guy walking the floor. I had a win mod 12 12 ga on the table for $400 and the guy with the Rem 41 wanted a win 12 pump.



The bottom of the box has hand written pencil note that took me YEARS to decipher. It says Last Derringer. I then thought cool, I have the last Rem Derringer that was made. Later I thought hmm, the last one in the store ! I added the stag grips and had ivory grips made for it. Still have the original HR grips.

Charlie
A very interesting box and "last gun". You may want to place all of this, along with the SN, on the Remington forum, as below. The later Rem O/U derringers had a date code. I never owned one that late, but do have that code in a notebook.

Remington Society - Index page
 

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Very nice piece.
The very last model 95's were made without the detail between the sides of the barrels.
They just had a simple curve in between them
 

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40 years ago I had Weldon Bledsoe cattle brand engrave a Remington derringer, and gold plate the barrel and silver plate the frame. Wish I had kept it. It is out there somewhere, anyone ever seen it?
 
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