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Just read that Remington is in financial straights due to lagging sales. They are looking at saling at cost just to break even.

The prep for a Hillary win put the hurt on many manufacturers!
 

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Predicting future sales is a calculated risk...they took a calculated risk based upon sales under Obama and what they thought the market would be under the expected win by Hillary. They bet and they lost...like many other companies. No one is entitled to success in the marketplace...it must be worked for and sometimes you win and sometimes you take it on the chin. Hopefully they can tough it out.

Colt hs made such bets for decades and they're barely hanging in there...and not for the first time. It's part of competing in a free market.
 

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I would guess the ongoing quality perception with Remington, Bushmaster and Marlin have something to do with the sales decline. While some companies can make a living selling poor quality products (a surplus "freight" company comes to mind) the Remington brands are not priced at the level of lower quality. The quality concerns in a shrinking market likely lead to a declining market share, a bad combination.
My experience with two 45-70 Marlin lever actions is very poor. I bought one of the Walmart Marlins and the stocks were poorly fitted, the Marlin bulls eye hole was drilled oblong so there is a void between the stock and the plastic insert and the finish was so poor that one trip to the range on a dry day left the rifle with LOTS of discoloration in the bluing.
I looked at new 45-70 stainless guns and the finish match between the receiver and barrel was so poor that it looked like it was made from unmatched replacement parts. For a gun approaching $1,000 it was terrible. At the counter at Cabela's a guy standing next to me commented on why the barrel did not match the receiver. Nobody had an answer, the sales guy said "that's the way they come these days".
In any event I hope they get things figured out. I like many of their products and have felt a loyalty to them over the years, I'd be very disappointed if they went out of business or dropped product offerings.
 

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Colt 1911 Gold Cups The best ever made
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Just read that Remington is in financial straights due to lagging sales. They are looking at selling at cost just to break even.
Here is my opinion on predicting the future:
Predicting the future ain't easy. That's why astrologers and fortune tellers tend to keep their forecasts as vague as possible.
Here is my Remington 870:
 

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LOL....remingtons invading a colt site........that said...i own.. 1100-12ga...1100-20ga..(in the market for a 1100 410)..versamax waterfoul special....870....742....700......but i do own more colts than Rs
 

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It is too bad that they are having quality issues, but unless they improve, they will need to reorganize or go down in flames. Perhaps these two were not a wise investment, but i purchased them both for a song..

Pair Remington 1911 200a.jpg
 

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It pains me to see great American companies failing- having problems and losing market share..

Maybe Remington should tool up and bring back those.

https://www.riverjunction.com/asset...ofaKinds/3132/LargePhotos/Remington1890-1.jpg

High quality forged steel made in the USA. Good old .45 Colt and/or .45 ACP duel cylinder. Make it happen.

At a grand- or a bit over- I would buy the first one I could find.

They might make some money- if they were original versions, quite a few old devils might like them.
 

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There may be light, but the tunnel has curves

Where to start? The move out of Connecticut was a good idea, due to the hostile political climate. It sounds like the move may have drained them financially, as QC went further down the dumper and product had to be moved fast. Truthfully, they were in decline long before that. The Marlin acquisition was noble, but played out like the Studebaker-Packard merger, with both sides likely blaming each other. DPMS had to be revived in an era of kit AR15s and a market glut of cheap black rifles. Bushmaster? What's the point? Black holes of investment dollars. The R-51 was an unmitigated disaster, more like Hi-Point than Remington. Never mind that it has only a squinty-eyed resemblance to the original elegant all steel 51. The RP-9 is sadly just another too-little-too-late poly 9 in a market that is unbelievably saturated. Design/QC problems caused it to be panned, and with $100 rebates and wholesale falling to $250, they are giving them away for cash flow - a really bad sign. They are hidden on the corporate website, but you can find them with some searching. The Model 700 lawsuits and the various recalls listed on their website lower expectations even further. The CNBC hit piece on QC problems is a stab in the back. Doom and gloom. Whence comes the savior?

Pure fantasy: As much as the Mosin-Nagant market has blossomed, for a safe, proven design, Remington could have/should have reintroduced a "Centennial" or even a 125th anniversary M1891. Marlins should be made by Henry, as they are a limited production item in today's market. The rest of the Remington line? Parted out and the name licensed. Have US Armament make a genuine R-51 (as well as a Savage?). The 700s? Winchester can't make them as it is only a piece of paper and their products are farmed out. Bergara? Barrett? Ruger could step in, but rightfully likes its own designs. Will we see "Remington" cologne in Harley-Davidson dealers? Crazier things have happened.
 
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They're almost giving 870's away on black friday deals - now I understand why. Sad to watch American instutions go down the drain.
 

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They could learn some things from CZ,CZ manages(very well) to produce a myriad of excellent quality firearms at very reasonable prices in configurations that people will buy.I don't look at any new Wincheters,Savages,S&Ws,Remingtons or Marlins.I's not rocket science to know you can buy most model #'s on the used market.I would take a gently used older(pre 70's) firearms over todays current production of the same model from any company.I have a handful of Remington rifles that were non cataloged recent rifles made for the Gov. they are Mil Spec. so they had to pay attention and provide better than average products.
 

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My only experience is with Rem 870s we had in the Navy for shipboard defense. They were fine. And a few antique rolling blocks, which are one of the most reliable guns ever made. But I keep seeing this TV documentary about the safety problem on the model 700, I think it is. It's on every week or two. I'm sure that drives some buyers away. And not many people bird hunt anymore, or if they do buy a new shotgun they only go once or twice. So the market is just ....over really. It is sad.
 

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It's become an all-too familiar sight in business...an old, time honored American company is too heavily invested in old technology and ways of doing things with management that doesn't know its product or customer base. It doesn't matter what industry but the story is the same. The accountants rule decision making and the company can't seem to compete against new, upstart companies that are hungry and work with the newest and most efficient ways of manufacturing. The old company loses market share and cuts costs to try to improve its market position but quality is lost and the downhill spiral speeds up. Then the company gets bought by a larger company...a holding company that, as often as not, drains much needed cash from the firm while saying it's being "restructured". Only if the larger company knows the market and the product will things improve. Otherwise things get worse and carcass is sold off to hopeful investors.

It's happened before and will happen again...success is earned, not a given. It has to be continually earned through understanding the product, the market and the customers. It takes quality management willing to take the occasional calculated risk, treat its customers and employees with respect and never forget that loyalty is a two-way street. Tough decisions have to be made...not always pleasant decisions...but the company and its financial foundations have to be taken care of. It takes long-term, strategic thinking rather than being bogged down in short-term decisions. Short-term thinking...not looking past tomorrow...while sometimes necessary...is the process of a company that's losing.
 
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They could learn some things from CZ,CZ manages(very well) to produce a myriad of excellent quality firearms at very reasonable prices in configurations that people will buy.I don't look at any new Wincheters,Savages,S&Ws,Remingtons or Marlins.I's not rocket science to know you can buy most model #'s on the used market.I would take a gently used older(pre 70's) firearms over todays current production of the same model from any company.I have a handful of Remington rifles that were non cataloged recent rifles made for the Gov. they are Mil Spec. so they had to pay attention and provide better than average products.
longranger; you have a point here. CZ's catalog of firearms products is appealing and when a person examines those firearms in person he finds guns made by a company with the gumption to turn out a well-crafted product. I love traditional American guns and makers from bygone times. Marketing, gun media, and owners who've bought into currently produced firearms from American makers trumpet the superiority of new model designs and production methods. They may serve the purpose but they are not superior to firearms of previous generations. "Less is more" is the watchword when it comes to the new firearms available on the gun shop racks and in the cases. It's not gratifying to own and use guns laden with aluminum alloy, plastic components, sheet metal stampings, and "mystery metal" MIM, with exterior surfaces having "coatings" rather than finishes, and all shipped with sloppy workmanship and no discernible QC. It's cheap-o is what it is but this is all a generation of shooters knows.

I love...love...love double-action revolvers and have long appreciated both Colt and Smith & Wesson products. I regret that Colt hasn't been a player in the DA revolver market for so long now. Much as I admire classic, traditional Smith & Wesson revolvers, the current revolver products of that firm are so unrecognizable and unappealing to me that new Smith & Wesson revolvers are given no consideration. The company might just as well stop making them for I will always chose used examples of the Smith & Wesson revolver models I knew and wanted. I acquire classic Colt DA revolvers in the same way.

I hate it for the sake of Remington and Remington's reputation. There are a host of classic Remington models produced up into living memory that still offer usefulness and pride of ownership.

I regret the plight in which some American gunmakers find themselves. I regret the decline in participation in shooting sports and hunting. I regret a generation of shooters who don't know any better.
 
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