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I have a model 1875 that was never drilled for a lanyard ring. I know Don Ware has written a book about the percussion Remington Army and Navy models. Has he written one on Remington cartridge revolvers.
 

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I have a model 1875 that was never drilled for a lanyard ring. I know Don Ware has written a book about the percussion Remington Army and Navy models. Has he written one on Remington cartridge revolvers.
Has he written one on Remington cartridge revolvers. NO. I have that Remington Army book. I once belonged to the RSA, but dropped out because mostly modern guns were featured in articles, and a long running article (7 or 8 years?) on pocket knives.

I hate to say this, but have a hunch that the RSA doesn't want a book on the 1875, 1888, and 1890 Remingtons! I finally got an old long article from them on the Rem 1875, but had to ask countless times.

I can say that on the later Rem 1875's, that those with no ring are common. This one here is batch number 556, with no ring or hole for a ring. It is a 44-40.
 

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The Remington forum is a pretty lonely place for antique discussions.

Worse yet, I sent them detailed pictures with much description on the attached engraved Rem 1875. This one is unusual in many respects. I believe it to be very early SN 809, from 1875 production. That was over three years ago -- and so far it has never appeared in the magazine, or was replied to by such as Streitbeck.

Below are just a few pictures that were sent.
 

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The Remington forum is a pretty lonely place for antique discussions.

Worse yet, I sent them detailed pictures with much description on the attached engraved Rem 1875. This one is unusual in many respects. I believe it to be very early SN 809, from 1875 production. That was over three years ago -- and so far it has never appeared in the magazine, or was replied to by such as Streitbeck.

Below are just a few pictures that were sent.
All your guns seem to have "personality".
Thanks for posting them.
 

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Even with a poor bore it may be accurate. There are a few smiths around who could line the bore too if needed, one isvAlan Hartman in Houston Texas. Have you shot it,?
But the throat in that 44-40 is right at 0.445", while the 44-40 bullet is 0.429".
 

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I’ve only measured cylinder mouths of two 1875 .44-40s and one .44 Remington. All three were .445/.446 inch.
MLV thats why Remington made some up in 45 colt.
Or at least thats what I found on the Remington site. Don Ware wrote a nice article on them. At first Remington used the original cylinders, then later on they used a New 45 cylinder that was a bit longer. Like 0.030. This they did to ensure some stupid person did not stick a 45 cylinder in a 44 gun. Early 45 were marked on the left grip, later left rear trigger guard. Then the frame left side and the the barrel. Some were stamped under the left grip with 45 on the.left side. Very interesting revolvers these are. Remington offered these in full blue, plated frame only, rest was blue or completely plated. Offered in nickle or silver plate. And they offered ivory or pearl grips with pearl being way more expensive.
 

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Yes, a member of the Remington collectors group sent me copies of old ads. The .45 S&W was listed along with the .44s. No mention of .45 Colt but my correspondent said chambers were bored through and would accept Colt’s .45. 1875s are very interesting revolvers.
 

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I like old Remington revolvers. Here is a not so good photo, left to right: 1858, formerly belonged to an actor who's name I forget at the moment; 1858 engraved conversion w/ivories; 1875 in .44 Rem; 1875 .44-40; 1888; 1890; a little conversion and a over/under .41. Note: the one '75 and the '90 have the laynard rings.

As to a book dedicated to Rem cartridge revolvers, I'm not aware of one. I have the Perc book mentioned above and 'Remington Handguns' by Karr and 'Remington Arms' by Hatch. Old books, but neither goes into great detail...
 

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I like old Remington revolvers. Here is a not so good photo, left to right: 1858, formerly belonged to an actor who's name I forget at the moment; 1858 engraved conversion w/ivories; 1875 in .44 Rem; 1875 .44-40; 1888; 1890; a little conversion and a over/under .41. Note: the one '75 and the '90 have the laynard rings.

As to a book dedicated to Rem cartridge revolvers, I'm not aware of one. I have the Perc book mentioned above and 'Remington Handguns' by Karr and 'Remington Arms' by Hatch. Old books, but neither goes into great detail...
Chaffee, nice collection. Here awhile back someone on one of the forums thought that these old model Remington revolvers had cast iron frames. As far as I can figure out is that they all had Forged steel frames. Remington rolling blocks were forged, Maynard rifles forged, Sharps rifles forged. Most firearms manufacturers switched to forged parts earl, like around 1845-55. And Colt used forgings as well. There were several forging companies that performed firing operations for the smaller companies such as Steven's, Maynard and even Ballard. When Marlin purchased Ballard rifle company it was all forged parts.
 

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I like old Remington revolvers. Here is a not so good photo, left to right: 1858, formerly belonged to an actor who's name I forget at the moment; 1858 engraved conversion w/ivories; 1875 in .44 Rem; 1875 .44-40; 1888; 1890; a little conversion and a over/under .41. Note: the one '75 and the '90 have the laynard rings.

As to a book dedicated to Rem cartridge revolvers, I'm not aware of one. I have the Perc book mentioned above and 'Remington Handguns' by Karr and 'Remington Arms' by Hatch. Old books, but neither goes into great detail...
That is a nice assortment of Remington handguns. I had an 1888 like that once that surfaced near Sweetwater, TX.
 

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The Remington forum is a pretty lonely place for antique discussions.

Worse yet, I sent them detailed pictures with much description on the attached engraved Rem 1875. This one is unusual in many respects. I believe it to be very early SN 809, from 1875 production. That was over three years ago -- and so far it has never appeared in the magazine, or was replied to by such as Streitbeck.

Below are just a few pictures that were sent.
That’s an amazing gun, and I really like that slim Jim. The strange shape of the trigger guard cut out reminds me of the Pat Garrett holster only more stylish. I think my next personal Slim Jim will have that.
 

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This photo is of one of the little known reproductions of the Model 1875. It was made by the short-lived company Hartford Armory. I got it from a poster in the classified section of this website in 2019. Its .44-40 but for one or another reason I've yet to fire it. But will eventually. The company made these to excellent quality standards. The serial number on this is either HA0006 or HA00010. I'd have to go get it to ascertain which. The other number belongs to a Model 1890 by the same company. Its .45 Colt and likewise has not been fired by me.
707255
 

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This photo is of one of the little known reproductions of the Model 1875. It was made by the short-lived company Hartford Armory. I got it from a poster in the classified section of this website in 2019. Its .44-40 but for one or another reason I've yet to fire it. But will eventually. The company made these to excellent quality standards. The serial number on this is either HA0006 or HA00010. I'd have to go get it to ascertain which. The other number belongs to a Model 1890 by the same company. Its .45 Colt and likewise has not been fired by me. View attachment 707255
Nice holster rig too!
 
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