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I spent some time today working on a take-down scratch on my Government Model.

I removed the grip bushing and magazine release. The thumb safety probably could have stayed in place.

I cut a strip of gray Scotch-Brite pad, which I glued to a block of wood. (I have a few I keep on hand). I clamped another block of wood as a guide to ensure the polishing blended with the existing finish. I covered the side touching the frame with some painters tape.

I also used the taped block to assist in removing a few light scratches from the slide. If the scratches are deep enough, you can use a littler fine-grit sandpaper prior to using the pad. I used a 2000 grit with a drop of oil.



Gov Model Stripped.jpg
Gov Model Blocks.jpg
Gov Model Clamped.jpg
Government Model Slide.jpg
20200725_150617.jpg
 

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Great job. Yes, stainless steel can be cleaned up quite nicely however if that scratch gets into the matte stainless portion of the finish it becomes much more problematic. Again, good work.
 

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Very well done! I thought once you have the idiot scratch your stuck with it. I have one stainless Colt 1911. My other's are all blue. I like the classic look of blue. The stainless is more durable and less holster wear!
 

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looks good !!
i passed on a Colt recently due to the take-down scratch. if it had been stainless , I’d reconsider after seeing your results were successful.
 

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Hoppy, that scratch is what gave that gun character, shame on you. Now it’s just a refinished gun.😂
 

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Nice job Tim. Now I know what to do with mine.
Thanks, Matt. One of the most important parts is having the right tool to remove the grip screw bushing. I bought Brownells bushing driver bit. Overall, it works well. That being said, I tried to remove a bushing from the opposite side. It was pretty much frozen, and I managed to slip. That's a story for another day...
 

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Nicely done. I've bought new Ed Brown slide locks for all my 1911s. They have a small groove cut in the end to make it so much easier to put the lock back in without scratches. Works great
 

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There is one way that "may" allow covering a minor scratch on a bead blasted surface.

Use some wet or dry sand cloth and put it over the scratch.
WITHOUT MOVING THE SAND CLOTH, tap the back of the cloth a few times with a small steel hammer.
A hard plastic hammer may also work.
Be careful not to allow the edge of the hammer to dent the cloth or underlying metal.

LIFT the abrasive and position a fresh section over the scratch and repeat.
This will simulate bead blasting to some extent and can disguise a scratch by blending it into the bead blasting.

The trick is to be careful not to move the abrasive while it's in contact with the surface or you'll damage the bead blasting.
Experiment with various grits of abrasive to find one that most closely matches the bead blasting.
 

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Many year's ago I bought a Gold Cup with a big idiot scratch. I shot the hell out of it then sold it. Big scratches' just bug the heck out of me. When I putting my Colt back together after cleaning I'm very carful not to screw it up!
 

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I have never understood how it seems logical to push down on the slide stop. Push in and up and never get an idiot scratch.

I have cleaned up all kinds of light scratches from stainless guns with no discernible evidence the scratch was ever there. (I have also had good results from polishing bright nickel.)

Judicious sandblasting with the right media size is the only way to remove significant scratches from matte stainless. As dfw says, some light scratches on a matte finish can be reduced or hidden by the method he explains. I use a semi-soft plastic hammer to avoid a possible dent from a steel hammer edge and to give a more blended result.
 
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