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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've found a local shop selling an unfired Colt 1860 Army Signature Series. However, somewhere along the way, it received a wack on the grip that left a gouge about 4mm across and about 2mm deep.

They are asking $595 for it, which is reasonable, except for the ding. The ding is right in the middle of the grip and it bothers me.

Does anyone have any thoughts on the value of this gun? Does anyone know where I can find a replacement grip and what it might cost cost?
 

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Since these were made from parts supplied by Uberti, a Uberti made grip can be used. Since the back strap and trigger guards vary slightly, some fitting may be necessary.

Since these were Uberti parts guns, there really aren't any "genuine Colt" grips, and no way to identify them if there were.
For grips you can buy any Uberti or other most any other brand replica grip including unfinished and they should be a good fit.

Sources of suitable replacement Uberti grips are:

1860 ARMY Accessories | Numrich Gun Parts

You can also find grips from Uberti sellers like Dixie Gun Works, Cimarron Arms, etc.

Sorry, I have no data on value. The gouge in the grips will reduce value some amount. Value also depends on whether the gun comes with the original box and papers, and any Colt accessories.
 

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It's hard for me to imagine 4mm x 2mm as a gouge :)

But anyway, I can understand how it stands out and screams at you.

If it were me I would rather sand the scratch gouge out and revarnish the grips. That way you would still be retaining the original wood and the cost would be minimal or close to zero if you do it yourself.

John Gross
 

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The grips are serial numbered to the gun on the inside. Replacing the grips with non serialed grips is a no no to a collector. To a shooter it would not be an issue. 595 seems on the steep side even without the gouge. If u want the gun use the gouge as a levering chip with the dealer. See if he can reduce the price because of it.
 

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A Uberti grip for the same model will fit. They are already varnished. If the Uberti grip is not an exact fit, I would take it and the pistol to a local gunsmith to have the grips fitted to the gun. Unless you are an experienced gunsmith yourself, I do not recommend that you try it yourself because you could do some expensive damage to your gun.
You might want to write the serial number of your gun in the inside groove of the grips with a pencil. That will make them like factory originals.
 

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...You might want to write the serial number of your gun in the inside groove of the grips with a pencil. That will make them like factory originals.
I don't know about that one Steg...kind of like buying a box label and writing in the serial number....
I would like to see a picture of the gouge in any case...either leave it and shoot it or try steaming it out.
 

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I don't know about that one Steg...kind of like buying a box label and writing in the serial number....
I would like to see a picture of the gouge in any case...either leave it and shoot it or try steaming it out.
I'll bet there are plenty of those. That's why I don't get into the packaging materials much. What's the point? The gun itself ought to stand on its own. I collect coins and the condition of the coin is paramount. Guns are similar and the paper given with it should not be worshipped like I sense it is.
 

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I'll bet there are plenty of those. That's why I don't get into the packaging materials much. What's the point? The gun itself ought to stand on its own. I collect coins and the condition of the coin is paramount. Guns are similar and the paper given with it should not be worshipped like I sense it is.
I agree 1000% Unfortunatly, many collectors of 2nd and 3rd generation Colt percussion guns are more of the "collectables" ilk than they are gun collectors. The "adjustment" of lables and on these guns is larger than anyone would like to admit! Especially when you consider the large sums involved. Just look at what is offered on e-Bay to see what I mean.
As for the grips, I know for a fact that the grips on both 2nd and 3rd generation percussions were purchased from Uberti, which means that they are made from European walnut instead of American Walnut as were the originals. The fact is that the European made grips cost much less than having the grips made in America. Never forget, Colt is in business to make money, not to service collectors! This was true in Sam Colt's time and it is true today.
 

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I agree 1000% Unfortunatly, many collectors of 2nd and 3rd generation Colt percussion guns are more of the "collectables" ilk than they are gun collectors. The "adjustment" of lables and on these guns is larger than anyone would like to admit! Especially when you consider the large sums involved. Just look at what is offered on e-Bay to see what I mean.
As for the grips, I know for a fact that the grips on both 2nd and 3rd generation percussions were purchased from Uberti, which means that they are made from European walnut instead of American Walnut as were the originals. The fact is that the European made grips cost much less than having the grips made in America. Never forget, Colt is in business to make money, not to service collectors! This was true in Sam Colt's time and it is true today.
I'm all about the guns. If the parts come from Uberti, OK, fix the gun. But don't put a bunch of fake paperwork and boxes on a par with the implement itself. The classic part is the gun.
 

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Steg;

Please understand, I mean no disrespect here, but............. where I come from that's called fraud, and in the gun circles I frequent, it would not be tolerated. It's not only wrong, it's deceitful and it just ain't right.

And no, it will not make them like factory originals. It will make the entire revolver suspect.

Bud


A Uberti grip for the same model will fit. They are already varnished. If the Uberti grip is not an exact fit, I would take it and the pistol to a local gunsmith to have the grips fitted to the gun. Unless you are an experienced gunsmith yourself, I do not recommend that you try it yourself because you could do some expensive damage to your gun.
You might want to write the serial number of your gun in the inside groove of the grips with a pencil. That will make them like factory originals.
 

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You are entitled to your opinion. However, if someone did what I suggested to an otherwise pristine 2nd or 3rd generation pistol, how would you know? The only way would be if you had seen the gun in its damaged condition before the grips were replaced.
In addition, not all grips on 2nd or 3rd generation Colts were marked with their serial number, and of those that did, not all were in pencil. Some were marked in ink, others in ball point. As with all other Colts, you will find almost everything!
I have guns in my collection with all 4 variations: pencil, ink pen, ball point pen and no Serial Number. These variations are more common in 3rd generation Colts than in the 2nd generation.
 

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Ok, fair enough steg, and as you said, we are each entitled to our opinions.

Just one thing though. When I was a boy, and had just done something my father didn't appreciate he told me something. He said, "Bud, the measure of a man isn't what he does. The measure of a man is what he does, when no one's looking."

I've always known my father to be a wise man.

Bud


You are entitled to your opinion. However,<<<<< if someone did what I suggested to an otherwise pristine 2nd or 3rd generation pistol, how would you know? >>>>> The only way would be if you had seen the gun in its damaged condition before the grips were replaced.
In addition, not all grips on 2nd or 3rd generation Colts were marked with their serial number, and of those that did, not all were in pencil. Some were marked in ink, others in ball point. As with all other Colts, you will find almost everything!
I have guns in my collection with all 4 variations: pencil, ink pen, ball point pen and no Serial Number. These variations are more common in 3rd generation Colts than in the 2nd generation.
 
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If you knew only half of what many antique gun dealers and auctioneers considered to be normal trade practice, you would never buy a gun from the internet or at auction. Why do you think that Flayderman published such long detailed articles about how to determine authenticity in his 9 antique gun books?
The only defense a collector has is to learn everything possible about his area of collecting interest. The old advice to gun collectors that they should have one book for every gun they own is especially valuable. You should also buy only from a dealer you trust! You may pass up many bargains in doing this, but at least you won't get stung.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Gentlemen,

I appreciate the colorful replies. I have learned a lot. I did not know that the grips are serialed to the gun.

However, the gun shop in question was unwilling to deal because of the grip, so I passed. If anyone is interested, I can give them the name of the shop. They want $595.

Instead, I found a nice lightly shot Colt 1860 Signature Army. Since this one was already fired, I intend to shoot it. I also purchased a 45L Colt conversion cylinder. When I find some cowboy loads, I will shoot it.

I now own a original (heavily fired) 1860 Colt, a (unfired) second generation 1860 Colt, and a (lightly fired) 3rd generation 1860 Colt. I have the trifecta of 1860 Army's.

Product Tool Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Air gun
 
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