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Signature series is 3rd gen not second gen. I believe 2nd gen is metric. Can't remember what 3rd gen is....never had to replace any yet despite intensive shooting. Is yours 2nd or 3rd gen? A call to Dixie gun works would clear things up.
 

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Actually, I think there are only two Generations with the Percussion Revolvers.

The Second Generation had two phases, the last phase, being the 'Signature Series'.

Whether the Nipples were different in these respective phases, I myself do not know.
 

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With due respect for Oyeboten, there were two phases of Second Generation Colts, but the Signature Series was not a part of it. The two phases of the Second Generation were:
The "C" series which consisted of the M1851 Navy and the Third Model Dragoon. These guns were made from crude Uberti castings that were finished and assembled in the Hartford Factory, using American made internal parts and screws. The C series guns had a bright blue finish similar to that on SAA Colts; and the "F" Series which were made by Lou Imperato's Harrison and Richardson factory, under sub-contract in New Jersey. The F series consisted of all Hartford percussion models except the M1849 Pocket pistol. Production of all Second Generation Colts was abruptly terminated in 1981, and Lou Imperato lost Harrison and Richardson as a result.
The Signature Series came about as a settlement of lawsuits against Colt by Lou Imperato. He was granted a license to manufacture Colt percussion revolvers and the use of the Colt name and copyrights. He established a plant to assemble the Signature Series guns in Brooklyn, N.Y. under the name Colt Blackpowder, Inc. Lou Imperato was able to re-hire most of the people that worked in his New Jersey plant. The Signature Series consisted of all Hartford percussion models except the Roots, plus a Texas Paterson model having a 7 1/2 inch barrel and loading lever. Production was from 1995 through 2001. Colt had nothing to do with this series except for a few guns purchased by the Colt Custom Shop.
Since the Signature Series guns were assembled and finished by essentially the same people, many collectors call this the 3rd generation Colts. For more information about both 2nd generation and 3rd generation percussion Colts, I suggest getting a copy of "Percussion Colt Revolvers, the Second Generation, Collectors Handbook & Price Guide #6".
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the help you guys. I did contact a place called Track of The Wolf and they helped me out quite a bit with the correct size nipples and wrench. Mine is a 2nd Gen 1851 Navy made in 1978. The reason I am replacing the nipples is because some previous owner decided it was a good idea to dry fire the crap out of it and some of the nipples are a little hammered. I'll probably have to replace the hammer also because of a nice round indent in it from smashing the nipples. Don't know much about how to do that but I guess I'll learn. Luckily the gun is in very good condition other than what I mentioned and was never fired except for the factory. Box and all paperwork was included.
 

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With due respect for Oyeboten, there were two phases of Second Generation Colts, but the Signature Series was not a part of it. The two phases of the Second Generation were:
The "C" series which consisted of the M1851 Navy and the Third Model Dragoon. These guns were made from crude Uberti castings that were finished and assembled in the Hartford Factory, using American made internal parts and screws. The C series guns had a bright blue finish similar to that on SAA Colts; and the "F" Series which were made by Lou Imperato's Harrison and Richardson factory, under sub-contract in New Jersey. The F series consisted of all Hartford percussion models except the M1849 Pocket pistol. Production of all Second Generation Colts was abruptly terminated in 1981, and Lou Imperato lost Harrison and Richardson as a result.
The Signature Series came about as a settlement of lawsuits against Colt by Lou Imperato. He was granted a license to manufacture Colt percussion revolvers and the use of the Colt name and copyrights. He established a plant to assemble the Signature Series guns in Brooklyn, N.Y. under the name Colt Blackpowder, Inc. Lou Imperato was able to re-hire most of the people that worked in his New Jersey plant. The Signature Series consisted of all Hartford percussion models except the Roots, plus a Texas Paterson model having a 7 1/2 inch barrel and loading lever. Production was from 1995 through 2001. Colt had nothing to do with this series except for a few guns purchased by the Colt Custom Shop.
Since the Signature Series guns were assembled and finished by essentially the same people, many collectors call this the 3rd generation Colts. For more information about both 2nd generation and 3rd generation percussion Colts, I suggest getting a copy of "Percussion Colt Revolvers, the Second Generation, Collectors Handbook & Price Guide #6".

Thanks steg!


I was confused ( and have been confused, reliably! ) about this.


Maybe I can keep it straight now finally.
 

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i was in error about the name of the subcontractor for the Second Generation F Series revolvers. It was Ivor Johnson Arms Company in Middlesex, N.J. Lou Imperato moved it from Fitchburg, Mass to the facilities of the Plainfield Machine Company in Middlesex, N.J. which he owned. The move and union of the two companies was done in 1977.
In addition, the dates of manufacture for the Signature Series was 1994 through 2002, not 1995 to 2001.
My bad! That's what I get for writing from memory, instead of checking my facts before I write.
 

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Davevall, regarding that indent in the hammer, assuming it is small...a GOOD TIG welder can put a tiny spot of weld there and you can then slowly stone it down to size...no one would ever know it happened. but the hammer needs good heat sinks around it to not show case color change and the welder has to know what he is doing. a slow cool from that minor welding should not cause any heat treat change. Just my 2 cents. Actually I would try it first as is...you may not have to do anything after replacing the nipples.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Dandak, Thanks for the info. I'll give it a try as is and see how it goes and if it's a problem I'll check into the welding. I have a very good metal smith here is Sarasota that I am sure can do it.
Davevall, regarding that indent in the hammer, assuming it is small...a GOOD TIG welder can put a tiny spot of weld there and you can then slowly stone it down to size...no one would ever know it happened. but the hammer needs good heat sinks around it to not show case color change and the welder has to know what he is doing. a slow cool from that minor welding should not cause any heat treat change. Just my 2 cents. Actually I would try it first as is...you may not have to do anything after replacing the nipples.
 
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