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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Handgun holster Wood Gun accessory Personal protective equipment Pattern

I had to make a video tutorial for my new Lone Star Holster pattern pack. I chose my 1947 Colt Transition Official Police as the weapon I would make the holster for.

The three-part video tutorials for the new holster pattern can be viewed at:

The commercial for the Lone Star Holster pattern pack can be viewed at:

Holster patterns for double action revolvers have been needed for some time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is a beautiful setup!!!!!! Looks to be a 6" OP? I'd love to have one exactly like that but black, handcuff case and all. The keepers are a great addition! It'd mate well with my 1949 nickel OP and I'd likely have to wear it to work my last week before retirement in a few years. What would they do? Write me up??:cool:
What could they do? Bend your dogtags and send you to Vietnam?
 

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Perhaps the most accurate reproduction of the 'late' Brills by saddler Rabensburg for A.W. Brill, post 1932. Including his carving style. I'd want to see the backside of the fender to remove the 'perhaps' :).

FYI Brill scabbards were made with NO glue at any position -- not the welt stack, and especially not the 1mm thick lining -- and the welt was positioned for the pistols by pressing it up against a 'plug' of leather Rabensburg made for the purpose. Your method is clever :).

Images are from the Rabensburg family collection:

Rectangle Wood Bag Tints and shades Brick


Brown Wood Amber Automotive lighting Automotive exterior


Rectangle Eyewear Tints and shades Bag Bumper


Road surface Wood Floor Wall Brick


Handwriting Sleeve Font Signature Rectangle


Well done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Perhaps the most accurate reproduction of the 'late' Brills by saddler Rabensburg for A.W. Brill, post 1932. Including his carving style. I'd want to see the backside of the fender to remove the 'perhaps' :).

FYI Brill scabbards were made with NO glue at any position -- not the welt stack, and especially not the 1mm thick lining -- and the welt was positioned for the pistols by pressing it up against a 'plug' of leather Rabensburg made for the purpose. Your method is clever :).

Images are from the Rabensburg family collection:

View attachment 800121

View attachment 800122

View attachment 800120

View attachment 800124

View attachment 800123

Well done.
Wow! That's some GREAT archival photos and information!

My intention wasn't to make a reproduction of the Brill holster, but to capture the style and function of holsters of that era.

I did study many examples of the carving style and attempt to figure out what it looked like originally. Even my own carving designs I've done hundreds of times evolve over time. I wanted the essence of the carving to be recognizable, but adapted it to my own sensibilities.

My main goal was to simplify the construction to the point anyone with the basic skills could replicate the pattern. Towards that end, I departed from the originals while still retaining the look. I hope with the instructions and illustrations in the pattern pack, and the video tutorial, folks will be able to supply the need for double action revolvers and the 1911, with nice retro holsters.
 

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Yes but . . . you can't possibly earn enough from your skill by selling patterns that you've created, with great talent, out of thin air. I made my entire living creating new designs that have resulted in the manufacture of literally millions and millions of leather and fabric designs over a 50 year period :). I'm happy to practically give away holster history in the form of my book with Witty that is Holstory, because it is not MY information. But raw design with the patterns to make them from? That's why there is no 'how to' in Holstory, because it would be the product of a half century of hard labor never again to be repeated in anyone's lifetime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes but . . . you can't possibly earn enough from your skill by selling patterns that you've created, with great talent, out of thin air. I made my entire living creating new designs that have resulted in the manufacture of literally millions and millions of leather and fabric designs over a 50 year period :). I'm happy to practically give away holster history in the form of my book with Witty that is Holstory, because it is not MY information. But raw design with the patterns to make them from? That's why there is no 'how to' in Holstory, because it would be the product of a half century of hard labor never again to be repeated in anyone's lifetime.
Between making gear for movies, western action shooters, modern carry, selling patterns, it pays the bills. I don't get rich, but I have time to pursue my unfunded preaching habit. In fact, when I was laid up for a year because I was riding my bicycle and was struck by a SUV, pattern sales paid all the bills. It just happened to be the Covid-19 lockdown so people were at home needing something to do. But it worked out for my otherwise unfortunate situation.

I could go on early retirement now if I wanted to, but I'll never retire. I could go on disability but my plan is to recover enough to start sky diving again (old paratrooper), so being disabled wouldn't fly. But when I'm unable to produce anymore, my patterns will still bring in some cash. Unfortunately for me, I haven't been as smart or industrious as you have been. But you never know. Colonel Sanders was a failure at business until he was in his 60s and started Kentucky Fried Chicken. My big break may be just around the corner...

I will have to add your book to my collection though. I love history!
 

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Ya done good, WillGhormley :). Not my intention to assert otherwise. I figure if folks want to make holster they can create their own damned designs instead of copying mine (Askins Avenger etc.). The M12 was heavily copied but then we sold a complete build package to the Army for that very purpose so it's made by even other countries' militaries. I used to keep images of the various versions by Croatia et al but dumped 'em.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ya done good, WillGhormley :). Not my intention to assert otherwise. I figure if folks want to make holster they can create their own damned designs instead of copying mine (Askins Avenger etc.). The M12 was heavily copied but then we sold a complete build package to the Army for that very purpose so it's made by even other countries' militaries. I used to keep images of the various versions by Croatia et al but dumped 'em.
No offense taken. In fact, it was when I noticed folks were copying my holsters I realized if I provided patterns for them, at least I could make a little money out of it. It's all worked out well and I have no complaints (except for those few individuals who take credit for what I've done; but that's to be expected).
 

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Yeah. Thing about copyists is that they don't know which part to keep and what to discard. JB's original #9R was the inferior to my #9R-2 but his has been copied and mine has never been. But the configuration of mine was the ultimate configuration of Jack Martin's inverted shoulder holster of 1934 (we have a letter in which he announces he has perfected it, while aboard ship in the Navy) that gave the performance and retention that none of the others, especially Wally Wolfram's elasticized version, could ever give.

THAT's why folks need to design their own. But few are capable of making something from nothing.

I'll buy one of your pattern sets at some point. I literally gave away all my equipment this year including my $5,000 Ferdinand Pro 2000 stitcher and my 50-piece gun casting collection so I won't be using your patterns. Even the Brills and Myres that I disassembled into patterns -- couldn't find a single person who wanted them, free. It's not a dying trade; it's dead! Someday when a future gunfighter wants a Nichols horsehide holster duplicated for its high performance, there will be no living person who will be able because of the science that went into its design and its manufacture! Like a certain violin maker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah. Thing about copyists is that they don't know which part to keep and what to discard. JB's original #9R was the inferior to my #9R-2 but his has been copied and mine has never been. But the configuration of mine was the ultimate configuration of Jack Martin's inverted shoulder holster of 1934 (we have a letter in which he announces he has perfected it, while aboard ship in the Navy) that gave the performance and retention that none of the others, especially Wally Wolfram's elasticized version, could ever give.

THAT's why folks need to design their own. But few are capable of making something from nothing.

I'll buy one of your pattern sets at some point. I literally gave away all my equipment this year including my $5,000 Ferdinand Pro 2000 stitcher and my 50-piece gun casting collection so I won't be using your patterns. Even the Brills and Myres that I disassembled into patterns -- couldn't find a single person who wanted them, free. It's not a dying trade; it's dead! Someday when a future gunfighter wants a Nichols horsehide holster duplicated for its high performance, there will be no living person who will be able because of the science that went into its design and its manufacture! Like a certain violin maker.
Yeah, there are plenty of folks who are better at every aspect of holster making than I am. But the ability to create is something beyond just craftsmanship. It's collecting the information and then connecting the dots. Probably one of the reasons I was a good field asset for Military Intelligence. Pay attention to detail, assess, then figure out how it all fits together. Now I just do it with leather and for weapons.

But there are still folks out there putting two and two together. They email me with questions all the time. Most of them already know more about the industry than I do. But they have difficulty with the creative part. But there is a 17-year-old who just pesters me with questions daily. Then he goes off and creates things. He's got a lot of potential. So there is hope out there.
 

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Very good. I hate to beat this to death but I feel compelled to: it was the end of WWII that put the wind beneath the wings of Heiser, and its acquisition (no evidence that any monies were paid to The Denver, a retail store that owned it in 1950) by Keyston Bros to support their 'junior cowboy and cowgirl' capgun holster sets production, was the end of Heiser. That was JB's entree into gunleather: the falls of the houses of Heiser and Myres and Clark, and the soft competition from J.M. Bucheimer and Lawrence. Bianchi and Safariland, Neale's version of the Bianchi company, took over gunleather in the '60s in the way that Glock took over from Smith and Colt when they were weakened and sold by the '80s.

It was only JB's operation from 1970 onward that gave me the opportunity to express myself with gunleather innovation and all such innovation ceased precisely in 1985 with the advent of the Kydex of Rogers and Perkins plus the soft fabrics of Uncle Mike's and Bianchi. JB always said that the conditions that created the Golden Age of Gunleather would never be repeated and so far he's been right! That means that your youngster has no audience waiting for him as I did; Glocks and Kydex spelled the end for gunleather because they eliminated all innovation even by the industry leaders. And Holstory the Book is based on that premise: gunleather innovation began in 1905 with the Kluge scabbard that today we know as the Brill because August Brill bought out Kluge Bros saddlery in 1912, and ended in 1985 with the jump from gunleather and the sales of both Bianchi and Rogers to Perkins. Fini.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Very good. I hate to beat this to death but I feel compelled to: it was the end of WWII that put the wind beneath the wings of Heiser, and its acquisition (no evidence that any monies were paid to The Denver, a retail store that owned it in 1950) by Keyston Bros to support their 'junior cowboy and cowgirl' capgun holster sets production, was the end of Heiser. That was JB's entree into gunleather: the falls of the houses of Heiser and Myres and Clark, and the soft competition from J.M. Bucheimer and Lawrence. Bianchi and Safariland, Neale's version of the Bianchi company, took over gunleather in the '60s in the way that Glock took over from Smith and Colt when they were weakened and sold by the '80s.

It was only JB's operation from 1970 onward that gave me the opportunity to express myself with gunleather innovation and all such innovation ceased precisely in 1985 with the advent of the Kydex of Rogers and Perkins plus the soft fabrics of Uncle Mike's and Bianchi. JB always said that the conditions that created the Golden Age of Gunleather would never be repeated and so far he's been right! That means that your youngster has no audience waiting for him as I did; Glocks and Kydex spelled the end for gunleather because they eliminated all innovation even by the industry leaders. And Holstory the Book is based on that premise: gunleather innovation began in 1905 with the Kluge scabbard that today we know as the Brill because August Brill bought out Kluge Bros saddlery in 1912, and ended in 1985 with the jump from gunleather and the sales of both Bianchi and Rogers to Perkins. Fini.
Good points all!

I'll concede the Golden Age of Gunleather as manifest by big name manufacturers has probably seen its day. Kydex, Kevlar, polymers, nylon, all take less skill to manufacture once the design phase is completed, and are cheap. There is no competing with modern materials on an industrial scale. But that's were little shops like me are left with a wide open market devoid of giants.

My BBQ Holster pattern was developed as an alternative to modern materials. It's simple in design and manufacturing. It serves the needs for modern belt-mounted weapons. Yet it has the appeal and aesthetics of leather. And if the maker has the artistry to pull it off, it has a nice carving pattern. But most importantly, it's simple.

Perhaps because we've operated at opposite ends of the spectrum, we view the market differently. I absolutely think your point is valid that gunleather as you've experienced it on a grand scale is probably over. But I've never competed with Bianchi or any other large manufacturer. And I've intentionally kept my operation small so I can do everything myself. And I still pay the bills.

Having this discussion has actually brought something into focus for me. Catering to the niche market of custom leather holsters in a nation of multi-millions of handguns holds many opportunities for the individual ready to exploit the situation. If indeed the giants of gunleather manufacturing are dead (and you would know, having been there-done that), the person who caters to the little shops still filling the need for real custom gunleather, is sitting in the catbird seat! That could be me!

As long as I'm willing to serve those hundreds of mom-&-pop shops that are out there scrambling for their market share of the custom holster industry, I may still have a purpose and an income. It's something to ponder on...
 

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WillGhormley I absolutely agree with all your points. Dig a bit deeper though; the likes of Bianchi et al had very few handguns to keep pace with. They were the 1911/Commander, the M39, maybe the P-38 and Luger in 1960. The S&W and Colt revolvers and their copies. The Ruger Blackhawks and the Colt SA. Y nada mas. And we had a literal wall of a hundred such new firearms to check our designs against.

Today's maker has a hundred makers when including all their glockalikes, then all the models within. How do they keep up? Not by owning all those pistols, but by buying molds of them. This prevents them from knowing if anything about their design or construction of the holsters interferes with the pistols' controls. Triggers, manual safeties (as if, right?), grip safeties (ditto), mag buttons, trigger shoes, firing pins. So design becomes a brainless exercise fueled by pistols with no passive or active safeties, and carried over the belly pointed at body parts.

Used to be this wasn't tolerated by thinking designer/makers. Now it is, on a 'take all the warnings off and let God sort it out' line of thinking. Irresponsible and for the brief final years of my own line, I wouldn't make holsters for glockalikes nor for belly carry. No market! This is not the 1970s with its safe pistols and savvy gun handlers; this is the 21st century of amateur designer/makers and gun handlers who only know what they see on CSI :-(. Not a market that should be served, IMHO, and so I retired.

I've enjoyed our intellectual banter and see that you know your stuff. I'm very impressed with your brilalike :). Done well the welts are meant to retain your revolver without a safety strap; that was the point of what was originally called the Kluge Scabbard.

Newspaper Publication Font Paper Document
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
WillGhormley I absolutely agree with all your points. Dig a bit deeper though; the likes of Bianchi et al had very few handguns to keep pace with. They were the 1911/Commander, the M39, maybe the P-38 and Luger in 1960. The S&W and Colt revolvers and their copies. The Ruger Blackhawks and the Colt SA. Y nada mas. And we had a literal wall of a hundred such new firearms to check our designs against.

Today's maker has a hundred makers when including all their glockalikes, then all the models within. How do they keep up? Not by owning all those pistols, but by buying molds of them. This prevents them from knowing if anything about their design or construction of the holsters interferes with the pistols' controls. Triggers, manual safeties (as if, right?), grip safeties (ditto), mag buttons, trigger shoes, firing pins. So design becomes a brainless exercise fueled by pistols with no passive or active safeties, and carried over the belly pointed at body parts.

Used to be this wasn't tolerated by thinking designer/makers. Now it is, on a 'take all the warnings off and let God sort it out' line of thinking. Irresponsible and for the brief final years of my own line, I wouldn't make holsters for glockalikes nor for belly carry. No market! This is not the 1970s with its safe pistols and savvy gun handlers; this is the 21st century of amateur designer/makers and gun handlers who only know what they see on CSI :-(. Not a market that should be served, IMHO, and so I retired.

I've enjoyed our intellectual banter and see that you know your stuff. I'm very impressed with your brilalike :). Done well the welts are meant to retain your revolver without a safety strap; that was the point of what was originally called the Kluge Scabbard.

View attachment 800305
I like the retention welt of the Brill-type style of holster. But for my 1947 Colt Transition Official Police with it's two-tone matte and polished finish, I didn't want the friction working on the matte finish of the frame edge. Preserving the finish was also a good reason to incorporate the pigskin lining. Even on the weapons I don't worry about the finish on, I'm concerned about the long-term retention created as the welt compresses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
One thing I noticed while I was designing the Lone Star Holster was the tendency of the holster to pop the mag-release on 1911s while in the holster. I could see the drag marks on the Brills and wondered how they ever kept the mags in. I solved the problem with a cutout that leaves a void in the holster for the mag release. I don't know how the old timers solved the problem???

I also found out the welt retention doesn't work for semi-autos that don't have a slide lock. The style is fine for the 1911 and P35s, but would be problematic for Glocks and such.

As for the Kludge Scabbard, I've never seen an example. I really don't get out much...

For modern slide sidearms, they have a tendency to fall into categories. But I've realized it's impractical to own one of each. Even though my personal batch of sidearms runs in the hundreds, I don't want to own all of them (they just aren't compelling). The ones I don't want to own I buy dummies of when available. I need to buy a house with a "panic room" and just turn it into a walk-in gun safe.
 

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You have seen a Kluge scabbard, you just didn't know it. It's an 'early' scabbard but minus the Brill name stamped into the cuff, Butch Cassidy's being the earliest and most famous. Made in the Kluge Bros. saddlery 1905 at Capt. John Hughes request, and without a marking until A.W. Brill bought out Kluge Bros. to start up his own operation after departing W.T. Wroe of Austin in 1912 (who himself was moving into automobiles, but failed and retired). This construction including its unique carving is found on all Kluge scabbards and all Brill scabbards made by Kluge until 1932, when Rabensburg joined Brill and made his own version. The Kluge scabbard without the marking, has a dozen different details vs the Rabensburg for Brill. And the only Rabensburg's without the Brill marking are those with the Ranger's initials stamped into the cuff; a practice that Kluge also followed for Rangers (we have examples of both that match these Rangers' years of service).

Product Purple Rectangle Font Violet


The Brill by Kluge, with the Brill name. For example the cuff is much wider than the 'late' version:

Sleeve Helmet Household hardware Font Tool


Side by side, a Kluge-made Brill with a Rabensburg-made Brill:

Leg Human body Font Thigh Pattern


The hand sewing of the cuff ends, showing on the backside, are the best giveaway for the difference, but still obvious otherwise. ALWAYS made with this difference in particular:

Artifact Wood Font Rectangle Human leg


As-designed, the cuff ends are not opposite each other but instead are crossed upwards like arms at the wrists. This allows the ends to slip under the belt's lower edge because it is the cuff edges that form the lower half of the belt tunnel, and the fold of the holster's fender that defines the upper part of the tunnel. Get this wrong and the belt simply won't enter against the friction of the cuff ends.

Also, there is a purpose behind no blue being used on the scabbards: left free the thin lining, which was calfskin but I used kangaroo, shifts when the fender is folded so it can lay flat. Glued thoroughly and the lining resists the bending so much that even hammering wetted leather doesn't give you 'flat'. Also, the lining does not extend to the muzzle inside the holster whether the traditional half lining or what appears to be a full lining; the lining is not there to protect the pistol as it is today, it is there to protect against wear on the trousers leg (according to Elmer Keith himself). All such were machine sewing a lightweight Singer-type for the linings, the main welt stack and the muzzle lip were always hand stitched. Notice the trademark machine sewing at the mouth of this 'late' Brill:

Glasses Wood Sleeve Artifact Font
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You have seen a Kluge scabbard, you just didn't know it. It's an 'early' scabbard but minus the Brill name stamped into the cuff, Butch Cassidy's being the earliest and most famous. Made in the Kluge Bros. saddlery 1905 at Capt. John Hughes request, and without a marking until A.W. Brill bought out Kluge Bros. to start up his own operation after departing W.T. Wroe of Austin in 1912 (who himself was moving into automobiles, but failed and retired). This construction including its unique carving is found on all Kluge scabbards and all Brill scabbards made by Kluge until 1932, when Rabensburg joined Brill and made his own version. The Kluge scabbard without the marking, has a dozen different details vs the Rabensburg for Brill. And the only Rabensburg's without the Brill marking are those with the Ranger's initials stamped into the cuff; a practice that Kluge also followed for Rangers (we have examples of both that match these Rangers' years of service).

View attachment 800338

The Brill by Kluge, with the Brill name. For example the cuff is much wider than the 'late' version:

View attachment 800340

Side by side, a Kluge-made Brill with a Rabensburg-made Brill:

View attachment 800341

The hand sewing of the cuff ends, showing on the backside, are the best giveaway for the difference, but still obvious otherwise. ALWAYS made with this difference in particular:

View attachment 800342
Wow! Thank you! That fills in some gaps in my history!

I'm much fonder of the carving pattern on the Kludge than later Brills. But maybe that's because I've been carving an adaptation of the Brill carving for months...

I wish I'd spent more time conversing with you about the Lone Star Holster pattern before I finished it! I guess I should have bought your book.

Thanks!
 

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One thing I noticed while I was designing the Lone Star Holster was the tendency of the holster to pop the mag-release on 1911s while in the holster. I could see the drag marks on the Brills and wondered how they ever kept the mags in. I solved the problem with a cutout that leaves a void in the holster for the mag release. I don't know how the old timers solved the problem???

I also found out the welt retention doesn't work for semi-autos that don't have a slide lock. The style is fine for the 1911 and P35s, but would be problematic for Glocks and such.

As for the Kludge Scabbard, I've never seen an example. I really don't get out much...

For modern slide sidearms, they have a tendency to fall into categories. But I've realized it's impractical to own one of each. Even though my personal batch of sidearms runs in the hundreds, I don't want to own all of them (they just aren't compelling). The ones I don't want to own I buy dummies of when available. I need to buy a house with a "panic room" and just turn it into a walk-in gun safe.
I've come back to this one. Can't have more than one pistol in the same caliber here in my State so you can see how impossible all this w/b for me. I restricted myself to the Old School pistols that were pre-Glock and declined to build for the striker fired pistols; of course the market was too small.

Yes, one learns FAST when using real pistols, if a slide will stay closed or not when holstering. My wakeup call was the Colt Pony that looked like a 1911 but the thumb safety does not lock the slide; immediate trouble from the field so a mistake that was never repeated (making a new design or fitment from a non-working slug). THE reason to never rely on them in your own shop, too.

The mag button on the 1911 was a problem with gunleather from day one. Shelton of Shelton-Payne Arms patented the first holster that dealt with this, and the plug inside the M1916 holster is there for just that purpose. Here is how Brill resolved that (sometimes); this particular Brill has an open muzzle, something that Sessums also did:

Footwear Brown Shoe Wood Outdoor shoe



And here is how competitor L.A. Sessums, but made by Robert Rogers his saddler imported from Mexico, solved it better:

Leg Automotive tire Synthetic rubber Road surface Bag
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I've come back to this one. Can't have more than one pistol in the same caliber here in my State so you can see how impossible all this w/b for me. I restricted myself to the Old School pistols that were pre-Glock and declined to build for the striker fired pistols; of course the market was too small.

Yes, one learns FAST when using real pistols, if a slide will stay closed or not when holstering. My wakeup call was the Colt Pony that looked like a 1911 but the thumb safety does not lock the slide; immediate trouble from the field so a mistake that was never repeated (making a new design or fitment from a non-working slug). THE reason to never rely on them in your own shop, too.

The mag button on the 1911 was a problem with gunleather from day one. Shelton of Shelton-Payne Arms patented the first holster that dealt with this, and the plug inside the M1916 holster is there for just that purpose. Here is how Brill resolved that (sometimes); this particular Brill has an open muzzle, something that Sessums also did:

View attachment 800356


And here is how competitor L.A. Sessums, but made by Robert Rogers his saddler imported from Mexico, solved it better:

View attachment 800357
It looks like the cutout in the Brill was a little high, judging from the wear discoloration on the lower edge of the cutout.

Getting the exact placement of the cutout when subtle differences in leather thickness and the natural variation in tolerance during manufacturing would make placement of the cutout critical.

I like the solution Sessums employs, but I'm always looking for the simplest solution so independent holster makers have a better chance of competing successfully.

I'm designing my patterns for customers with varying degrees of skill. I figured as long as the cutout didn't degrade the durability of the holster, it was better to go bigger. On different prototypes I had placement similar to the Brill holster shown (first example I've seen of a Brill with a cutout). But after two years working on the project (one year of that in a hospital bed thinking about it), the Lone Star Holster had evolved in my mind to ride as high as the form and function of the holster allowed.

The cutout I settled on for the Lone Star 1911 Holster was a little different.
Brown Wood Bag Everyday carry Electric blue

In the Lone Star Holster pattern pack is a pattern for extending the holster pattern to fit not only the 1 1/2" pant belt (holster shown), but a 2 1/4" Duty/Utility Belt, and a 2 1/2" gun belt. With the extension of the holster, the position of the cutout doesn't change. It ends up looking more like the Brill holster above.

At different times I've toyed with the idea of making a pattern for the M1916 holster. The original spacing wedges for the mag release were wood. For the sake of convenience I would include a pattern for the wedge, but have it made of leather. It wouldn't function any different from a wood wedge and the maker would already have the material on hand. And leather would be easier to shape into the wedge than wood. But I've never made the pattern because reproduction M1916 holsters are so affordable, I don't even make them for myself!

I did made a 1911 holster for for duty use after the Military switched from 1911s to the Beretta M92. We turned in our 1911s, the M1916s and M7s holsters, and drew Beretta gear. I was in a unit with a little more latitude in what we carried, so many of us purchased our own 1911s to continue to carry. I made this holster to fit on my canvas utility belt with my web gear. I cut the contour of the holster to ride below the mag release. (CSA stands for "Constitutional States of America.)
Wood Sleeve Knife Tool Pattern

For off duty carry, I made a cross-draw variant cut the same way.
Wood Knife Rectangle Denim Handgun holster

But while the half flap was a cool concept, it wasn't great for civilian carry. So I made a thumb-break safety variation, again with the mag release exposed.
Sleeve Textile Wood Waist Denim


I don't know how I would stay in business if/when the powers-that-be put limitations on the weapons I can own for making patterns. It will be interesting times if/when it happens...
 
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