Colt Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After reading several methods of checking the timimg on revolvers, I have discovered that three of my five Colts fail the "hammer back while slightly dragging the cylinder" test. The cylinder falls just short of the notch, while the hammer is in the single action fire mode. I don't see a problem when performing the the test using a slow trigger movement. I also don't see a problem when shooting the guns. Am I checking this right? Thanks everyone.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,229 Posts
You should just LIGHTLY have a finger on the cylinder to prevent the cylinder from "freewheeling".

It's entirely possible to induce a failure to lock by applying pressure to the cylinder.

With that said, THE most common Colt out-of-time condition IS the failure to lock up.

This isn't a real problem AS LONG as the gun does lock up before ignition.

Commonly, an out of time Colt will fail the lock test, but will lock up when fired double action, or when cocking the hammer with normal force in single action.

Also, the hand will usually force the cylinder into lock when the trigger is pulled.

So, although a Colt may be out of time, it's still usable, but you need to watch it to be sure things don't get so far out that the gun starts firing with an unlocked cylinder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. I feel a little better. My worst fear in firing a revolver is misalignment between the cylinder and the barrel. It seems the primer is large enough to cause ignition, even if it is not in perfect alignment. Any stories of this happening?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Even if it's slightly out of time, a normal cock to single action will put the cylinder stop in the notch. Check it out and if it does, I don't think you have to worry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Would we also be able to check timing by looking at the primer strikes for being centered, and the forcing cone for lead shavings? Ultimately, I think its easier for non-experts to see these signs then if the hand engages at the right time, etc. I know for me, the firing is an easier way to tell, is it as accurate though?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
My experience with Colts is that the timing is so 'fine' as to sometimes expose an imperfection in the ratchet. Often, the cylinder will time perfectly except on one charge hole and be just the tiniest bit late on that one. As dfariswheel has noted, if the cylinder locks up OK when the trigger is pulled or during 'normal' cocking motion it is acceptable. There are so many possible issues in timing a Colt(older models and Python) that sometimes it is better to live with it if it is not too bad. I can say from experience that the people at Colt can put it right-on if necessary. CC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hey Cobra, have you had a good experience with Colt's factory service. I was considering sending in a gun for some tune-up and custom work. Any idea how long it takes? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Hey Cobra, have you had a good experience with Colt's factory service. I was considering sending in a gun for some tune-up and custom work. Any idea how long it takes? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Chrono,
Yes, I have had good experience with Colt's service. While it had been a few years ago and things can certainly change, I was more than pleased. I sent a like new, 42 year old Official Police to them to correct the timing. They not only corrected the timing perfectly but did an 'unsolicited' trigger/action job and now the gun works better than the best Pythons. It is unbelievably smooth. So, I have great faith in their work. I believe it took 4-6 weeks. Hope this is of some help. CC
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top