Colt Forum banner

41 - 60 of 102 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
In shooting CAS matches I would always do like Cozmo and turn the cylinder after loading to make sure rotation was unimpeded. I wish I had a nickel for every fellow shooter who told me "You know the easy way to load that, don'tcha?" and then proceed to educate me on the "load one, skip one" thing. I noticed it seemed like their SASS number was usually 70,000 higher than mine. As Cozmo pointed out, encountering a high primer or other out of spec issue is inevitable, especially if you reload. I'd rather have my gun function than bask in the "knowledge" of some particular loading procedure. And yet, somehow my gun would wind up with the hammer down on an empty chamber despite my not following the newly received advice. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
In shooting CAS matches I would always do like Cozmo and turn the cylinder after loading to make sure rotation was unimpeded. I wish I had a nickel for every fellow shooter who told me "You know the easy way to load that, don'tcha?" and then proceed to educate me on the "load one, skip one" thing. I noticed it seemed like their SASS number was usually 70,000 higher than mine. As Cozmo pointed out, encountering a high primer or other out of spec issue is inevitable, especially if you reload. I'd rather have my gun function than bask in the "knowledge" of some particular loading procedure. And yet, somehow my gun would wind up with the hammer down on an empty chamber despite my not following the newly received advice. :eek:
I shoot factory ammo and I haven’t ever encountered a high primer situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #43
lboos said:
I think Colt made his SAA with six holes for a reason, and real men/cowboy's of the old west prob. used all six. just common sence....
Prior We've all had long discussions on who loaded five and who loaded six. But I don't think you can call loading 6 "common sense".

1873 to 1900 or so the population got around on trains, wagons, horse and buggy. Not the genteel life style we all live today. If you have spent much time around horses/cows/pigs you know they are all big strong creatures that can kill you in a heart beat. Horses more so than most. Colt was a tool. No sense to knowingly allow it to bite you. 5 rounds was generally considered enough to get anything done that needed doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,938 Posts
Elmer Keith related the story several times of how a cowpoke he knew had a Colt sixgun fully loaded and while saddling his horse, the heavy iron stirrup fell and hit the hammer, discharging the gun and sending a bullet down the persons leg. It was no longer a time of imminent danger (the accident probably occurred in the 1920's) and the need to have six rounds chambered vs. the risk of accidental discharge was questionable. Maybe the cowpoke was carrying six because that's the way he always had done it and didn't know any better, and learned a painful lesson.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #49
Come on guys, try to keep up :) The thread aint about loading five or six, it is about spinning the cylinder after you load to make sure the ammo will not bind up the gun on the first shot.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
Well Shucks, after the 6th cartridge is loaded the hammer needs to come to full cock, which rotates that last cartridge past the loading window. If the cylinder turned enough with the cocking of the hammer what’s the problem?
Or another question...what’s the remedy if it does bind?

A slight bind isn’t a problem (in a pinch) with a swelled head, high primer or poorly resized case. Manual turning of the cylinder, hence the “flutes” aids in that.

Free spin really proves nothing other than the cylinder is not impeded in any way. But if there’s a bad guy or some Indian hacking on your weak arm with a Tomahawk you’d be darn sure to move that cylinder one chamber to firing position to slow or stop the threat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #51
LABill sez..
If the cylinder turned enough with the cocking of the hammer what’s the problem?
A slight bind isn’t a problem (in a pinch) with a swelled head, high primer or poorly resized case. Manual turning of the cylinder, hence the “flutes” aids in that.
If the recoil shield kept the cartridges in one position and equal distance from the cylinder face to the firing pin/breach face on a 360 degree turn, from first insert of the cartridge to cartridge ejection past the firing pin it wouldn't be an issue. But a Colt SAA has not always done that. It's basic SAA 101 stuff. Since the recoil shield is not totally flat, a complete spin of the cylinder is prudent. A cartridge that will fit in the loading gate and turn may not make it into firing position as the head space tolerences change depending on the location of the cartridge on the breech face and cylinder position.

If you have actually had to manually turn a stuck cylinder you'll find it aint all that easy to get done even with flutes to help. The remedy as anyone who has experienced it knows is either manually force the cylinder around enough to get the bolt to drop, then pull the cylinder. Not in any way easy and actually dangerous if it is a high primer. The other option is to detail strip the gun to get the offending cartridge/cylinder out of the gun.

Couple of Colts in the photos and why what was suggested is nonsense. Note the machine line of the breach face just prior to the firing pin bushing. I call it the "berm" for lack of a better name. I was told the frames are cut that way intentionally....to make the gun more reliable with the variable ammo.


Here is a 1912, 1st Gen with no frame "berm"



A 2nd Gen with a ratehr pronounced "berm".



And a 3rd with the "berm".



Most Ubertis and Piettas have a "berm". USFA guns do not. Can't tell you when the "berm" first appeared or why it disappeared. Don't have my other 1s Gen guns to make a comment on them. Same "berm" that will often as not totally jam a gun up it you try to cock it with the muzzle pointed at 90 degrees up. Point the gun at the ground and the gun cycles easily with the same ammo.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
No no. Ding ding FALSE!!

We are talking all the same ammo. Not mixed batches. Not sloppy handloading.

If the cartridges fall into the chambers with no or little effort, the first loaded cartridge will be the same as the 6th. Will it not?

Step or No Step. First, 2nd or 3rd generation matter not.
If the first cartridge rotates 4/6th of the way around like the succeeding other four, then the 6th will too.

Shoddy reloading practices or mixed batches of unknown tolerances will jam up the works. That’s NOT the SAA’s fault. It’s the user.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
This UBERTI (I keep having to remind myself at times this is a Colt Forum and not Uberti) Cylinder is at the 5th Cartridge loaded well into the stepped area (headspace) you mention, before the 6th cartridge is dumped in.

Thats enough of a test right there.
If number 5 wont allow the cylinder to advance something is wrong.
No free spinning would ever remedy that.
So to say load one, skip one as a test for free spinning would be incorrect.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,211 Posts
Discussion Starter #54 (Edited)
I was gonna say you are clueless. But by all means carry on.

LeverActionBill said:
... load one, skip one as a test for free spinning would be incorrect.
Glad you figured that out.

Heaven forbid a bullet actually extends out the end of the cylinder :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
Even IF you load one, Skip One it puts the first cartridge in the same position you see in my photo above.

An incorrectly or wrong sized cartridge would still hang up.

My Question Still Is: What would you free spinning the cylinder prove?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
Come on guys, try to keep up :) The thread aint about loading five or six, it is about spinning the cylinder after you load to make sure the ammo will not bind up the gun on the first shot.
So in essence you are advocating spinning the cylinder because you may have loaded poorly manufactured ammunition?

Reloading SPECS are published for the shooters advantage to make and shoot safe, well-fitting cartridges.

Sample reloaded ammo every so many to ensue proper reloading technique. I do believe that’s RELOADING 101.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
I do reload. Often.

And even after reloading for 42 years I still; weigh, measure, size and sample my batch to ensure I’m within the published tolerances.

The last thing I do is check OAL as I give each one a quick eye inspection before I put them in my plastic range boxes. And I shoot...a lot.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
421 Posts
Coz,
Your thread, but I was wondering if running 'loaded' factory ammo(.44-40, 200 rounds)back through a resizing-die, that won't chamber flush in an SAA cylinder, a totally safe/smart thing to do? My RCBS "RELOADING 101" book does not cover this contingency. Thanks.
 
41 - 60 of 102 Posts
Top