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Thank you for all of your suggestions. I do not know why it is rusting. My other pistols do not have this problem. This is alarming. I am just going to have to regularly examine and maintain them. I will purchase copper wool. There is this cloth that is made up of copper and a cloth type of material. This should be very mild on the cylinder. So I will first try this one. I will get this handled. This is happening to one of my 1849s. I have two. One has a longer barrel than the other.
When I saw your thread the first thing I did was to see if you lived in a high humidity area. I would imagine that the humidity is kind of low in Tucson. I live in Missouri and we are moderate to high humidity and I have not had any problems with rusting using WD40 and then Breakfree for a lot of years. I would be curious to know where the gun was stored. You have some good information as to removing the rust but I hope that you don’t have more in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
The 1849 was stored in my safe, in a zipped up rug. I am in the process of checking out my other firearms, holding my breath, hoping to find no rust. I have some expensive collectibles in my safe. I have one flintlock duelling pistol in fine condition that was made in 1770. The safe is a large, Liberty safe. I am going to have to use oil or wax to preserve all of them.
 

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4/0 steel wool will remove cold blue, so you do have to know what type blue you have. Otherwise 4/0 steel wool is good. Don't use brass wool doing rust bluing, as the brass rubs off on the steel and the bluing won't take.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
If this has been reblued, it may very well be cold blued. I understand cold blue can be rubbed off. So I need to be really careful. I have ordered copper wool. This may prove to be a better approach.
 

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I got some brass wool from homestead firearms and have never looked back. Now I NEVER use steel wool on blued finishes...there is just no reason too.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I used the above with coconut oil. There is a very small scratch when I used a cloth with attached small spots of copper, but this did not happen elsewhere. I need to keep adding oil. So I used the Big Frontier Meter Cleaner which worked well. The rust is coming off slowly, which is good. I am going to remove just the more obvious spots of rust.
 

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The 1849 was stored in my safe, in a zipped up rug. I am in the process of checking out my other firearms, holding my breath, hoping to find no rust. I have some expensive collectibles in my safe. I have one flintlock duelling pistol in fine condition that was made in 1770. The safe is a large, Liberty safe. I am going to have to use oil or wax to preserve all of them.
The zippered cases are not the best storage method. If any moisture at all exists on the gun or in the case it stays in the case and goes to the coolest spot, the gun.
 

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I should of used renaissance wax to preserve the finish. Now I see the beginnings of rust on my pistol. How can I take off this very light, spotty layer of rust? I am thinking of rubbing it off with a bit of FrogLube. There must be a better way.

Update:

Rubbing with FrogLube did not work, so I am trying CLP. I may need to use a very fine (finishing) steel wool.
I am going to give you some advice about preventing rust. There are some air conditioning "experts" who won't understand or like this! If you live in a place where both heating and cooling are required during the seasons of the year, then buy auto-switchover thermostats. The ones I have bought are set to come on with cool air above 74F, and come on with heat below 71F. This prevents "dew" from accumulating on your gun steel during those wild swings in outside temperature.

DO NOT BUY an auto-switchover thermostat for "programming". Some think that it is most desirable to allow your home to heat up or cool down while you are at work. This is a gun's worst enemy, and it will also run up your power bill. It runs up your power bill because everything within the outer walls are heating up (or cooling down). So when the cool air is allowed to resume, it has to cool down all of that mass (brick, walls, flooring, ceilings, furniture, books, etc).

Actually when I installed my auto-switchover thermostats my power usage dropped about 10%. That is what air conditioning companies DO NOT want to hear! They want to sell programmable thermostats.
 

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On small rust/oxidation freckles, I have had luck with rag soaking with a good oil.
Then wipe in one direction with rag patch. Always using a clean one with every swipe.
Normally I can see the red on the rag.
I then apply a swipe of light oil patch and cover it with a good gun grease.
Stored in breathable silicone gun sock, the grease layer keeps the oil on the freckle. With time, repeat and for the most part the freckle disappears or is substantially defeated.
All the tips are spot on.
Good reference thread.
Had to to that on the bottom of my Python grip frame.
Dang rubber grips!
Just put woodies on it! The treated surface does not touch the wood.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Thank you very much! I will look for this type of thermostat. I must protect my firearms. I have too much money invested in them, and I like them looking pretty. :)
 

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I am going to give you some advice about preventing rust. There are some air conditioning "experts" who won't understand or like this! If you live in a place where both heating and cooling are required during the seasons of the year, then buy auto-switchover thermostats. The ones I have bought are set to come on with cool air above 74F, and come on with heat below 71F. This prevents "dew" from accumulating on your gun steel during those wild swings in outside temperature.

DO NOT BUY an auto-switchover thermostat for "programming". Some think that it is most desirable to allow your home to heat up or cool down while you are at work. This is a gun's worst enemy, and it will also run up your power bill. It runs up your power bill because everything within the outer walls are heating up (or cooling down). So when the cool air is allowed to resume, it has to cool down all of that mass (brick, walls, flooring, ceilings, furniture, books, etc).

Actually when I installed my auto-switchover thermostats my power usage dropped about 10%. That is what air conditioning companies DO NOT want to hear! They want to sell programmable thermostats.
Victorio,

It is obvious that you don't understand the physics of air temp and the water-holding capacities of air. I don't know that I am an "expert" in the field of HVAC (heat/vent/AC) but I made a good living at it for 35 years (now retired), mostly working at various (3) hospitals, and have never been a commercial "air-conditioning" contractor, nor have I ever worked for one, so I don't have a dog in this commercial fight. Your auto-switch T-stat does absolutely nothing insofar as humidity control, which is the key point here, even though it may have saved you some money insofar as power usage. That is just an economic thing and has nothing to do with the OP's problem. The warmer air becomes it is able to hold more water (that's why it is called "relative" humidity) than cooler air. If a certain mass/volume of air is cooled to the saturation point it becomes rain/dew/frost/hail/snow. The same will happen indoors as condensation. If you have a cooling unit (central refrigeration A/C or even a window unit) you will notice the condensate dripping off of the evaporator (cooling coil) because the air temp has gone below the saturation point at discharge. Normal discharge air temps are about 55* and if the outside air temp is 70+* condensate will definitely occur unless you live in a continually very dry climate, and then it should be of little concern.

I think if the OP has any metal stored in the house it might be wise to get a dehumidifier for that area. I would also suggest procuring a few bags of silica gel dessicant to place very near whatever you want to protect. Silica gel is easily dehydrated in a warm stove oven or a microwave oven for future use.

Regards,

Jim
 

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Do not use steel wool. Even the fine steel wool will scratch and remove finish along with the rust. You want this:

Big 45 Frontier Metal Cleaner | Remove Rust from Gun Bluing and Clean Dirty Gun Bores Easy!

Alternatively you can use the edge of a pure copper penny to remove individual rust spots.
There is no such thing as a US "pure" small copper cent ("pennies" were an English UK thing: think pence) from the Flying Eagle, to the Indian, to the Lincoln Wheat reverse, to the Lincoln Memorial reverse. The last mostly copper cents were produced by the US Mint in 1982 and mid-year the Mint started using zinc as a base metal for the cents. The metal contained mostly copper plated zinc from then to the present day. The reason for the change to zinc was that one could melt down "copper" cents and it would be worth more than it cost to produce them due to the cost of copper as scrap.

There is no metallurgical reason why copper would remove rust.

Regards,

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I have removed as much as I can with the rust. So I wiped it down, and applied Renaissance Wax. This should do the trick. Thank you all for your suggestions. That special scrubber with coconut oil is a nice combination.
 

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I just noticed you'd started this thread as well as your other one on electrolysis methods for removing rust...

I live less than a mile from the ocean, on Cape Cod MA. Rust is a serious issue here, for anything metal. I run a dehumidifier in my basement during the summer, and also keep a generous coating of CLP on all my guns. I periodically peek into the safes with a flashlight too, to make sure no rust is starting. Usually about mid-summer I take each piece out and open the action/inspect the bore and internals, to make sure no rust is starting in the hidden areas. This is for the guns I don't shoot often, i.e. the milsurp stuff. This less-than scientific method has worked well for me for over 20 years living near the ocean.

My competition guns get shot and wiped down so often, they don't get the chance to rust. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #37
As an update, I used coconut oil on my Baby Dragoon, and rubbed the pistol with a soft rag. This did not work, so I used CLP as the oil. I had to be careful to not take off too much rust where the bluing would come off too. I finished it, and then used Renaissance Wax.

I found that the Big 45 Frontier Metal Cleaner, used with coconut oil, removed some bluing. I suspect the bluing on my pistol is actually a re-blued, which now would make sense. This type would come off much easier. So in this situation, I actually did not reduce the value of my 1849. It will retain the the same value as a re-blued version of the pistol.
 

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As an update, I used coconut oil on my Baby Dragoon, and rubbed the pistol with a soft rag. This did not work, so I used CLP as the oil. I had to be careful to not take off too much rust where the bluing would come off too. I finished it, and then used Renaissance Wax.

I found that the Big 45 Frontier Metal Cleaner, used with coconut oil, removed some bluing. I suspect the bluing on my pistol is actually a re-blued, which now would make sense. This type would come off much easier. So in this situation, I actually did not reduce the value of my 1849. It will retain the the same value as a re-blued version of the pistol.
Could you post a picture of the Pocket? It might help up judge whether the finish is original or a reblue.
 
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