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I thought the early ones like that didn't have the ramps on the cly. I might be wrong on that ??
No, you are not wrong, the cylinder is a part that was installed in 1875 when this SAA finished the inspection process for the US Gov't. The barrel was installed at this time, also. They are both later parts which are original to this gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I thought the early ones like that didn't have the ramps on the cly. I might be wrong on that ??
For reasons unknown, the frame, trigger guard, and grip strap were made in 1873 but kept in Colts inventory. 2 years later in 1875 they put a barrel and cylinder on it and sent it out.
 

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Collectors Firearms has #189 for sale currently
Noted in Kopecs Continuing Study pg 35. Out of my price range but figured y'all would want to know.
An interesting previously-rejected US Colt SAA. Was possibly rejected b/c of poor bore-cylinder alignment. But not worth anything like $32,500 with a "stretched" barrel.

Wanna bet that the first #189 barrel was installed on a civilian gun??
 
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When everything is taken into consideration the gun is not bad and the price is not out of line, If you want to all it a mixed parts gun with a stretched barrel then it sounds bad and is bad. The gun is not a mixed parts gun, it is as it left the factory when new. The barrel was returned to the original length after being cut at some point. This is a very early gun and saw use for a long time and many guns of this age had the barrel shortened. When taken in consideration with the very low 3 digit serial number then it is not so bad either. The early guns did not survive in the best of condition.
 

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When everything is taken into consideration the gun is not bad and the price is not out of line, If you want to all it a mixed parts gun with a stretched barrel then it sounds bad and is bad. The gun is not a mixed parts gun, it is as it left the factory when new. The barrel was returned to the original length after being cut at some point. This is a very early gun and saw use for a long time and many guns of this age had the barrel shortened. When taken in consideration with the very low 3 digit serial number then it is not so bad either. The early guns did not survive in the best of condition.
When everything is taken into consideration the gun is not bad and the price is not out of line, If you want to all it a mixed parts gun with a stretched barrel then it sounds bad and is bad. The gun is not a mixed parts gun, it is as it left the factory when new. The barrel was returned to the original length after being cut at some point. This is a very early gun and saw use for a long time and many guns of this age had the barrel shortened. When taken in consideration with the very low 3 digit serial number then it is not so bad either. The early guns did not survive in the best of condition.
That CUT barrel is what KILLS this gun. I have no problems with the rest of this US cavalry, as restored. I recently had a 3 digit US Cavalry gun (#216) with stretched barrel offered on gunsinternational for many months. It was a nice-looking gun, but only brought $9500.
 
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I don't see anything in Kopec's letter to confirm that it was issued to gov't service. After it was set aside in 1873 it did not get picked up until 1875, then 'floats' around. Why would the "US" have been obliterated if it was issued out? Just too bad Colt does not have a record on this revolver -- that would have removed all the speculation on its history.

I tend to agree that even a low 3-digit s/n in this condition should not be worth more than $15-$20K at the most.

Randy
 

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The US was damaged way later in life. The gun was later inspected by Casey before being accepted by the Government.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I don't see anything in Kopec's letter to confirm that it was issued to gov't service. After it was set aside in 1873 it did not get picked up until 1875, then 'floats' around. Why would the "US" have been obliterated if it was issued out? Just too bad Colt does not have a record on this revolver -- that would have removed all the speculation on its history.

I tend to agree that even a low 3-digit s/n in this condition should not be worth more than $15-$20K at the most.

Randy
The fact it was sub inspected means it was military. As for the US being obliterated, that happened a lot with military guns that were stolen, sold illegally, or lost in battle to prevent anyone from knowing it was an I'll obtained US gun.
 

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That CUT barrel is what KILLS this gun. I have no problems with the rest of this US cavalry, as restored. I recently had a 3 digit US Cavalry gun (#216) with stretched barrel offered on gunsinternational for many months. It was a nice-looking gun, but only brought $9500.
On this one, wasn't the previously cut barrel just swapped out with another 7 1/2" barrel? How do we know the original was cut if it is gone. I am a bit confused here.
 
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