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Discussion Starter #1
Gentlemen, I am a fairly new student of the Colt SAA. I have two , a 1906 and a 1996, both 4 3/4 in .45 Colt, and an engraved third one in progress at the Colt Custom Shop. The question is how to prevent the cylinder turn lines. I have looked carefully for the cause of the rotation lines. My 1906 Colt has them, the 1996 does not. The cylinder locking pawl on the 1906 was out of time and broken, I've had it fixed and it does not drag any more. It seems to me that cylinder rotation lines will only result if the mechanism is worn out of time or not adjusted properly.

So, have I properly diagnosed the source of the lines, any other considerations?

Thank you for your time.
 

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When you load/unload the revolver it is at half cock. ALWAYS bring the hammer to full cock before letting it down. If you let it down from half cock the bolt will pop up halfway between the notches. You then would rotate the cylinder to lock up dragging the bolt along the cylinder producing the dreaded cylinder turn line.

And welcome to the forum..!
 

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Bruce
First, Welcome to the forum.
Ratzo is right on.

To safely load your Colt with the hammer down on an empty chamber, This is the only safe way to carry a loaded Colt SAA!
Bring the hammer to half cock, load one chamber, skip one chamber, then load four chambers. Then bring the hammer to full cock & carefully lower the hammer. If you've done it properly, the hammer will now rest on the empty chamber.

You are really going to like your Colts. It sounds like you are hooked as you have one in the works from Colt.
Congratulations.
Frank
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The design of the one in progress at Colt's was developed in discussions with Bob ( R L ) Wilson, Chuck Priory and Steve Fjestad.

I've carried the third gen in some remote locations. I've always felt it was reliable and in .45 Colt packs enough punch.
 

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If I go to a gunshow I tend to leave my single actions in the truck until I get a dealer's pass so I can get them into the show without some knuckle head working the front door checking guns that doesn't understand the half cock notch on a single action. Instead of taking the hammer back to half cock most of these gun check in zombies hold it about 3/8 of the way back with their thumbs while rotating the cylinder and can put a drag line on the cylinder of a nice colt. (Insert frowning icon here).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just so I am clear on the loading /unloading directions, the cylinder on either of my SAA's will not turn when the hammer is brought to full cock and then let down to what would normally be the hammer position to allow the cylinder to turn. The cylinder will only rotate when the hammer is pulled back from a down, either full down or first click position.

So is Mr Ratso suggesting that the hammer be first brought back full, then returned to full down, then brought back to the second click rotate position? Doing that allows the timing rachet to perfectly position the cylinder in respect to the frame locking pawl so that it just pops up into the cylinder recess.


Next , with respect to the load five cartridges issue, I've noticed that when fully down , the hammer nose protrudes slightly beyond the frame. If the hammer is brought back to the first click position, the hammer nose is retracted fully into the frame. I've supposed that if the loaded gun somehow falls and lands on the handle end, there is a possibilty that the number 1 cartridge could fall back from the cylinder and onto the hammer nose with enough force that the hammer nose dents the primer. When the hammer is in the first click position, the hammer nose being retracted, there is nothing for the cartridge primer to fall against if the gun is dropped butt first. So is the first click hammer position ( not far enough back to be half cocked) unreliable? Does the hammer fall off the first click position when dropped? Is this because of design or because of wear to the trigger sear.....in other words, if the sears are to factory specifications, can the hammer fall down from the first click position if the gun is dropped? I realize that the old saying is to keep an empty hole under the hammer, but lots of those old guns are pretty worn and loose.
 

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Bruce, So it is clear, when you pick up your empty SAA, You bring the hammer back to half cock to load it. You load a cartridge in the first chamber. You rotate the cylinder past the next chamber leaving the second chamber empty. You then load chambers three, four, five, and six but you don't rotate the cylinder with your hand after loading the last chamber. Close the loading gate and bring the hammer back to full cock. This rotates the cylinder so that the empty chamber #2 is in line with the bore or under the hammer. You then hold the hammer back with your thumb, release the trigger with your finger. Once the sear disengages take your finger off the trigger and gently bring the hammer to it's full down position. The hammer will stop at the saftey notch, and you must release the hammer beyond that. The saftey notch is not designed for carrying the SAA in a "safe mode" but it is there should you accidentily let the hammer slip from under your thumb while de-cocking it over a loaded chamber.


To unload the revolver, bring the hammer back to half cock, open the loading gate and empty the live rounds or empties which ever are in the chambers. Rotate the cylinder to verify it is completely empty. Then bring the hammer back to full cock and drop it gently using your thumb.

If you followed the procedure correctly, and if you are going to practice this, I STRONGLY ADVISE PRACTICING WITH EMPTIES OR DUMMY ROUNDS, AND NOT LIVE AMMUNITION, you will not only know the proper method of loading and unloading a SAA but you will carry it in it's only truly safe mode while loaded. With and empty chamber under the hammer. You will also avoid putting a turn line on the cylinder.

Never trust the safety notch, Period.

As always, this is JMHO and how I learned to do it. Any method you choose is fully your decision, but this works for me.
 

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If I go to a gunshow I tend to leave my single actions in the truck until I get a dealer's pass so I can get them into the show without some knuckle head working the front door checking guns that doesn't understand the half cock notch on a single action. Instead of taking the hammer back to half cock most of these gun check in zombies hold it about 3/8 of the way back with their thumbs while rotating the cylinder and can put a drag line on the cylinder of a nice colt. (Insert frowning icon here).
I brought an unfired 1960 mfg Ruger flattop in the box to the Berea ohio gunshow last year. When the cop wanted to check the action I told him I'd do it for him while he examines the gun so as to not leave any drag marks. He replied that he "knows what he is doing" and would do it himself. He wound up doing exactly what you described.:mad:
 

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The military loading procedure was six rounds with the hammer on the safety notch. Wonder how many troopers invalided out with a .45 hole in his right foot? Also, I wonder if there is any way to see how many hammers had to be replaced on army colt's. Putting your Colt on safety is a really bad idea. If you drop it, that notch will shear and you've got an expensive repair job.
 

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The military loading procedure was six rounds with the hammer on the safety notch. Wonder how many troopers invalided out with a .45 hole in his right foot? Also, I wonder if there is any way to see how many hammers had to be replaced on army colt's. Putting your Colt on safety is a really bad idea. If you drop it, that notch will shear and you've got an expensive repair job.
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<br>I have also read of instances of guns dropping from holsters, landing on the hammer that was on the so called safety notch & firing.<br>There have also been instances of cowboys saddling their horse, placing the stirrup over the seat to tighten the cinch, the stirrup slid off the saddle seat, hit the hammer & fired the gun.<br>  It is very unsafe to carry a original design SA with all 6 chambers loaded.<br>Frank
 
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