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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, new to the forum. Shot my SAA for the very first time. It is a 2011, 5.5", SN S66xxxA.
I purchased it with the intent on shooting it occasionally.

I am concerned about the finish on the cyclinder because after only 50 rounds, the blue finish looks to have come off near the back end of every cylinder (closest the the forcing cone).
It looks like the type of wear that holster would produce on sharp edges (after years of use) or bluing loss at the muzzle after housands of rounds.
Ammo was Ultramax 45LC 250GR round nose flat point (CB45CN2)

Is this normal for a new SAA after only 50 rounds? Perhaps a warrantee issue?
I'm a little disapointed that a $1,300 gun would have finish issues. - Thanx for the input
View attachment 17947
 

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Same thing happened to minbe after shooting some factory loads that were a little hotter than cowboy loads. With some careful rubbing with a rag and breakfree CLP, they came off with no finish damage. But I think Ill stick with the lighter cowboy loads (they dont leave the residue),at least they dont on mine. And if I have to rub off those marks every time I shoot a hotter load, I think I will eventually wear off the bluing at the edges of the cylinder (it did take quite a bit of rubbing to get the marks off.
 

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That appears to be lead, which becomes "soldered" on when firing lead bullets. If you are going to be shooting the same bullets again, just leave it. Otherwise, it can be removed with some effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can not feel any residue or uneveness with my finger nail. It almost is like the metal turned from blue to white.

What would be suggested as the easiest methos to remove? Dab on breakfree CLP & let it soak?
Thanx for the input.
 

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It's not the finish, it's burned carbon/lead deposition.
Can be relatively hard to get off. I scrub with Breakfree & a bronze brush when it appears, and it's not just Colts that do it.
Denis
 

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I can not feel any residue or uneveness with my finger nail. It almost is like the metal turned from blue to white.

What would be suggested as the easiest methos to remove? Dab on breakfree CLP & let it soak?

Thanx for the input.
I did put a drop on each" mark" and let it sit for a few minutes then used a cotton cloth and rubbed at it with my fingernail over the cloth. It took a long time. I had exactly the same reaction as you did when i first saw these marks -looked like the bluing turned gray/white.
Probably a good idea to put a drop of CLP on each mark and let it set overnight first Might make it easier
 

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I believe that is the result of vaporized lead "condensing" on the surface of the cylinder. It is a thin layer of lead on top of the blue. The blue finish is not worn. It can be removed the same way you would remove leading from a barrel. You don't need to do anything about it though. Overly aggressive scrubbing may do more harm to the finish than doing nothing. I would let the cylinder soak in Hoppes or Breakfree for a day or two, then wipe, see what it looks like.
 

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Try cleaning it with Ballistol if the other cleaners don't do it for you-the stuff works wonders on lead and carbon deposits
 

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JUST DON"T USE ONE OF THOSE LEAD REMOVER CLOTHS!! I believe those may harm/remove the bluing also. Just stick to what the guys have mentioned above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanx for all the advice.
I will try spot soaking each area with Hoppe's 8 or Break free CLP.
This never happened on my Python, perhaps because I used jacketed ammo.
I'm not sure how difficult it would be to find 45LC in full metal jacket $$$.
 

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After you get the cylinder clean, put a coat of wax on the outside of the gun, cylinder included, clean up will be easier and it will make the gun look better.
 

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A couple more thoughts:

I have a SAA in 44 Special that I bought new from Colt a couple of years ago and experienced EXACTLY what you are going through now with your new gun. Don't worry, those really are spots of thin lead deposits, and they will come off with a little soaking and rubbing with cleaning patches. I might have gone so far as to use a toothbrush. What is interesting is that I have not noticed a recurrence of those spots since. I think the reason for that is that my gun has tended to be fairly liberally slathered in Breakfree when I have taken it out to shoot, and the film of CLP on the cylinder has prevented the lead from adhering. Admittedly, I have not fired a very large number of rounds between cleanings. So, the suggestion to wax the gun to lessen this lead spot problem seems wise.


Also, since your gun is a .45 Colt, I would seriously consider having Colt fit it with a second cylinder in .45 ACP. This would allow you to shoot the gun with ammunition using jacketed bullets that is readily available and considerably less expensive than 45 Colt ammo. I bet it wouldn't take too many boxes of factory ammo before the 45 ACP cylinder "paid for itself".
 
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