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My 2 most favorite loads to shoot in my python are: 7 grains of unique and a 158 grain SWC. Also 13 grains of 2400 and same bullet.These are loaded in Starline 357 brass with Winchester primer. I have never noticed these loads showing any signs of being excessive. Should I have any reservations about using these in my colt. I keep my guns nice, but generally am a shooter and so shoot them.I probably have been reading on the internet too much.
 

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Neither load should be excessive or maxed out for the .357 catridge so I wouldn't worry about shooting them. The Python is really quite a strong gun, but internet lore has them as frail and fragile.
 

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Nice piece of reading, Grant.

Thanks. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

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I shoot 13.5x2400 on the same bullet. My experience is from a pressure standpoint these are quite mild. Actually an arguement can be made that they are to low pressure to burn 2400 efficiently thus all of the unburned powder. It is a good load because you cannot double charge the case without making a mess which I really like.

Now from a recoil and battering standpoint these are mid range to low end 357 loads. If you pound enough of them in quick double action you might slowly beat your python into submission and it will need to be retimed like Grant says above. Accept this, enjoy it and keep shooting. It is not a big deal to retime a Colt. It just takes a bit of money, a good smith (like the Colt factory) and about a 6 week wait. Just don't let it go to far and beat the gun apart.

I shoot a lot of these out of my Python, it has been retimed once (bought used and buggered to begin with) and have never had a problem. I do not shoot quick DA shots, only slow methodical DA and mostly SA target shooting.

As a heavy N frame fan, and owning a few DW's, I don't find the python much smaller, only the working surfaces are smaller. They key in my mind is treat the gun with the respect and care it deserves. It is not a 250$ DW or Ruger, it is a $1000 quality made target gun. Treat it accordingly and you should have no problems.
 

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Grant,
Thanks for putting that together. What would you consider a normal maintenance interval for an Anaconda in .44 Mag? Should the action be checked about every 10,000 rounds? more often?

Tom

[ QUOTE ]
Yes, there seems to be a sizable group of folks who insist that the Python is overrated. I've thought about this for a long time, and here's my take on where this crap comes from:

http://grantcunningham.blogspot.com/2006/01/is-colt-python-delicate.html

[/ QUOTE ]
 

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[ QUOTE ]
What would you consider a normal maintenance interval for an Anaconda in .44 Mag?

[/ QUOTE ]
Now remember that the Anaconda is built on Colt's newest and strongest action. It is quite different from the older action that the Python is built on. You notice how there isn't a lot of talk or complaints about the King Cobra? The Anaconda is a scaled up KC and they are virtually tanks.
Maintenance derives from the checking you perform each time you clean your revolver. A quick check of the endplay, timing, and trigger action after cleaning and lubing tells you if further maintenance (or repairs) is needed. Also the time span between maintenance will be directly related to the power of your cartridges and how the revolver is treated. You like to push the envelop then be prepared for extra and more frequent maintenance. The only problem I have ever heard of for the Anaconda is pins breaking in the frame when subjected to some of the nuclear loads and there hasn't been a lot of complaints about that. I have subjected my .45 Anaconda to some of the "Ruger only" loads (though not a whole lot of them) you see in loading manuals and haven't had any problems.
So with every revolver being an individual I don't think you can look at a round count for a maintenance schedule. A tight specimen may shoot it's entire lifespan using factory or factory speced ammo without any repair. A loose specimen may only go a few thousand round before needing to be brought into spec then go the rest of it's life. An abused specimen may be lucky to make a few hundred rounds before repair is needed and if continued to be treated that way it would have a shortened lifespan.
 

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Thanks Majic! That sounds great - I just ordered my Anaconda yesterday (6" barrel, stainless steel, unfired for <$800) and am looking forward to hopefully getting it by end of next week.
Even though I've been shooting "all my life", it was - being a German citizen - mostly competitions with a Walther GSP, so I have to learn a lot about all the nice guns that are out there. (Moving to the U.S. was worth it just for having the freedom of owning the guns you want to have...)

Tom
 
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