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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a bad habit of buying Colts because of the stocks. I just received this Dual Tone OP hoping the stocks were Sanderson. However I am leaning towards early Herretts because they have no # stampings on the underside. But they do have small jig marks at the bottom. They are clearly hand checkered and are stunning and feel amazing in the hand. Very nice gain in the wood as well. I really like the finger grooves!! So do you think Sanderson or Early Herretts?















 

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I have the exact same grips except mine are just a tad darker brown and they have a large #4 stamped inside on each grip. Otherwise they look just like yours and with the gold eschuetens(spelling?).
I was told by others that they were Sandersons but I really don't know for sure. They cam off a Python that I bought quite a while ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks..can u post pics of the stocks front and back? And yes if they have a number stamped they are sandersons for sure. I was shocked to see these un stamped.
 

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I believe there was a discussion about this on the S&W forum (still current) regarding some Sandersons without the numeral stamped inside. Seems that some were made without the numbers. Those look like Sandersons (and very nice ones, too!).
Bob
 

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Thanks to Capstan. Well here is proof that not all Sandersons were stamped. Good to know. Mystery solved.
There were two Sandersons - Lew and later on his son Don both made custom pistol grips. I worked for Don for several years in the 1960's sanding the smooth parts - Don handled all the woodwork and cut the grips out of blocks of wood with machine tools like routers, drill presses, and disk sanders. I've seen a pair of Sanderson grips on a 45 that I worked on in the NRA National Firearms Museum in Washington DC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
BigG.. Thats great! Do you have any photos of work in progress or of the shop? Can you tell us about stampings, why some got it and others not, and what do the numbers represent or is there a lost chart? Any detailed info would be great so it doesn't get lost in history as a lot of Roper info has. And how did the jig mark get on there? Why only one unlike Roper who had 2.
 

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Beautiful stocks!

However, they are dry and neglected.

Why don't you clean them, dry them and apply your favorite high quality wood care product to the stocks. Skip the cleaning, if you wish. Those stocks look very dry. I use Murphy's Oil Soap and warm water to wash the stocks, dry well, then use Pledge Rejuvenating Oil, dry well, then apply Renaissance Wax, dry, buff clean. This procedure does clean darken the color of the stocks somewhat.
 

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BigG.. Thats great! Do you have any photos of work in progress or of the shop? Can you tell us about stampings, why some got it and others not, and what do the numbers represent or is there a lost chart? Any detailed info would be great so it doesn't get lost in history as a lot of Roper info has. And how did the jig mark get on there? Why only one unlike Roper who had 2.
No photos. That was about 50 years ago now. Sanderson had his own method and produced stocks based on an outline of a shooter's hand for whatever gun was desired. Usually Colt 45 Auto, S&W or Colt large frame revos; Colt and High Standard 22 autos were the typical models. His finish was on hte whole grip. He dunked the whole thing in a tub of his finish and took them out to drain on a chicken wire rack. The outsides were polished with a buffing wheel and the insides left alone. I would say there should be evidence of finish on both sides of a Sanderson grip though. The numbers might reflect a mythical size of hand per Sanderson's calculations. The grips stayed together throughout manufacture so there was no need to have them identified further. The numbers might be if he was making several of the same model at the same time so he could keep the halves together though. It was never such a large operation that you couldn't tell what went with what by eyeballing them.

The two grip materials he used were rock maple and walnut, both obtained from Bishop, IIRC. They were just the end of stock blanks Bishop sawed off and discarded otherwise. Sanderson took those little blocks and machined them into very practical pistol grips.

Here is some more on Sanderson from S&W forum. Sanderson Grips
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks BigG, i have studied both of those links before many times. But there is nothing like a first hand account. Thanks again. Can you tell us about the jig mark?
 
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