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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, noticed these marks on the breech face of my Python when I was cleaning after a session at the range. Big question is... is something seriously wrong with my Colt. :eek:
20151213_223454.jpg

I've owned the gun for less then a year, and have only taken it shooting twice. Both times firing combo's of mags and specials from Speer, Blazer, American Eagle and Sellier and Bellot and have approximately 175 rounds through it since I've purchased it. The gun locks up solid, and shoots like a dream, I didn't notice it acting out of the ordinary when I was shooting it.

For what it's worth the gun was made in '83. The previous owner guessed it only had 50-100 rounds through it at the time of the sale. Of course neither he nor I have proof of this claim.

Any assistance in this would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Those striations are straight and angled downward from the outside, rather than being radial, so were not made by the cylinder rotation or crane opening/closing. It is possible that a set-back case (high pressure or heavily lubed chambers) locked the cylinder in place, or primer setback from an underpowered load wedged the primer against the breech face - either situation could lock the cylinder in place, and some form of tool might have been used to pry the case or primer forward. The marks look like a metal or abrasive tool was used. The only other thing that comes to mind is someone scraping powder residue from the breech face.
 

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^^^^ I never would have even noticed those marks, especially with the thing running flawlessly.
I hot loaded mine once, with a somewhat high velocity and potentially high pressure 'experimental' load. The only noticeable effect was increased 'commotion' during firing. The revolver simply did not know the difference.
And the load was ok for accuracy. I just didn't like all the excess noise, recoil, & muzzle/cylinder gap blast from it.
So, if your revolver had a backed-out primer, or heavily slammed case head brass jammed in between the cylinder & frame, it does not appears as if there was any damage. These things are extremely tough, even if they are delicate, precision machines. You can check the end shake and gap if you must, but I think you are OK.
Sweat ye not, lest ye appear tight of rear passage.
You're fine.
Run that badboy.
 

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Like mentioned above, the grain of those marks are in a direction that does not correlate to the movement of the cylinder in and out of the frame. Even if a case is considered the culprit, the direction still does not match up.

Most likely those marks were made by someone as in the suggestion of trying to scrape off residue or carbon. Either one of the previous owners or yourself. Since you only shot it twice, I would assume the previous owner(s), and you just did not notice it until now. It happens very easily to overlook stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the fast replies guys, looks like my worries were for nothing serious.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have a snake to fondle. ;)
 

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Thanks for the fast replies guys, looks like my worries were for nothing serious.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have a snake to fondle. ;)
Just be careful with the end that has fangs.
 
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The marks look deep or maybe it's just the photo. Colt might have made the marks when making the revolver. Wouldn't be the first time. I once bought a new Python and didn't notice that the muzzle was cut on a angle. I didn't realize it until after I fired it and was cleaning. I sent it back and Colt squared off the muzzle. Quality does slip from time to time.
 

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My best guess is those are machine marks made by a dulling machine tool cutter that was over due for replacement.
At this late date I don't know what Colt would or could do about it, but if you want you could send it in for them to take a look.
You could also call them and talk to them, or possibly send the picture to them.
Usually, they'll want to actually have the gun to inspect.

It probably will have no effect on shooting.

Second best guess is that a previous owner did something with a sharp tool trying to do God knows what, but I'm going with a Colt factory defect.
 

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Are the scratches blued over? You'll often find factory file marks around the whole inside perimeter of the frame, and it's not uncommon that it's quite clumsily done. Those areas can be pretty darn rough sometimes, and it looks like they hand filed it to clean it up after machining.
 

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Are the scratches blued over? You'll often find factory file marks around the whole inside perimeter of the frame, and it's not uncommon that it's quite clumsily done. Those areas can be pretty darn rough sometimes, and it looks like they hand filed it to clean it up after machining.
I was wondering that, as well. Can't really tell from the pic.
 
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