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After making a magnificent (and lucky) shot, the proper technique is to make a graceful and not boastful bow, then holster the gun and refrain from firing another shot that day no matter HOW much they badger you.

This will preclude you from exposing yourself as the duffer you really are.

Many a legend has died aborning by the irresistible urge to take that next shot, which you ALWAYS miss.

A small Mona Lisa smile and holstering the gun is the only proper course of action.
 

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Been awhile since I've read any, "Sea Stories," about shooting and thought I'd chip in a couple. Once upon a time, when I was a 21 year old rookie cop, my small department had its qualifying day at the range. I had court at the same time so by the time I got to the range, our detective, who was in charge of the qualifications, was waiting and growing very impatient and it was now raining pitchforks and hammer handles. Four of us rookies had just come out of the academy and the detective says, "OK, hot shot ... you shot expert in the academy so hit this and we'll call it good." (With that, he puts an empty 12 guage shotgun shell on the target rack at about 30 feet and took his place behind me on the firing line.) To this day, I don't know what I was thinking of but I guess I was peeved at the challenge. I wasn't even in uniform - I was wearing a suit for court, as was required and was carrying my brand new Colt Cobra, not my customary 6" Official Police. As soon as he took his spot, I turned to the target, yanked out my gun and fired one shot, arm extended but hardly aimed fire - and HIT the blame shotgun shell. I played this up for all it was worth, turned to face him, did my best to, "twinkle-up," my eyes, blew the smoke from the gun ala TV cowboys and reholstered and said, "OK, what's next?" He swore a string worthy of any sailor and we went back to the PD and had coffee. I kept my, "expert," status. My favorite comes from the days - pre WWII, when my grandad was a uniformed guard at the Mack Truck factory in Allentown, Pa. The guards, then, used to carry sidearms and had to qualify ever year.My pap's buddy,let's call him, "Clem," was the worst shot on the force and always dreaded this day. But,creatively, the man in charge of the event had decided to use a, "balloon shoot," this year. All hands would fire a precribed target course for practice and then, for a, "GrandFinale," Every man would take his turn in a ten-at-a-time string and on command, draw, fire and burst a single balloon about 30 feet in front of him. (I suspect this was done to, "make sure," Clem's balloon would burst, somehow or another.) No instructions are given about how many shots you could fire, so no one would know, for certain, whose shot broke which balloon. Clem must've been ready and eager to, "get 'er done," and as soon as the command, "Fire," was given, he manages to squeeze off the first round, which, of course, hits the string all the balloons are tied to and the whole string just floats off, up into the air, being secured only by one end. I would've anticipated everyone to begin blasting away at the floating targets but everyone began laughing so hard, no one was able to shoot and the event had to be re-done. "Clem," and my pap both retired from Mack's many years later and would still recall this story after few Horlacher beers. (Which used to be a local brewery.) Eventually, I traded off that Cobra for a Colt .45 Combat Commander for off-duty and got a 6" Python for duty. Mack's used to supply revolvers to their guards, who were at the time company employees - not from an outside agency, and to the best reseach I could conduct, were all S&W triple locks, which were all sold off in the 60's. I suppose they were all .38's but I do remember they had 6" barrels and looked like cannons to me! From the pictures remaining, the guns look like S&W 1917's, which would have made them .45's, I guess. Maybe that's why, "Clem," would flinch so bad and dread his yearly shooting demands? Wouldn't we have liked to be around when they were sold? But, like the army surplus autos and revolvers sold through NRA for cheap, nobody had the price in their pocket then, either!
 
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