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Discussion Starter #1
I own two Colts: a 1911 from my dad's ww2 service and a cobra...which I use for home protection and carry.
I pulled out the semi and for the first time I so much appreciate the condition that it is in. Not a pit anywhere
and all markings clearly stand out.

Having said all that, for a .22 semi..if my goal is to use it to develop shooting skills, have fun, and have something reliable and sturdy...do I need to have a colt .22? Ruger's seem more affordable, though I won't get the same configuration...the barrel is not similar. Mach 3 series is something that I will hold, dry fire, and consider. The country gunsmith prefers the government model but they don't make it anymore. He can adjust the pull while all other models require a whole new trigger. I don't think that I can tolerate a 5lb pull.
Another positive for the Ruger is that I can get it new and not have to worry about functional issues. Plus, parts are easier to come by and add-ons are more doable. I'm fairly patient when it comes to making a decision but I do feel a sense of loss after sending back the match target colt. I gave it a detailed cleaning...and this seemed to result in a better cluster and no eject-load failures. I'm curious as to what it will bring at auction but I need to let it go. And, sometimes collections never make it to auctions; collections are just bought out right.

When I consider alternatives to a colt .22, what should I keep in mind as to the trade off?
Budget is circa 600.00.
 

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I'd buy a Colt Woodsman in any of the many variations. These are great quailty, accurate .22 Semi-autos. You have two Colts now. Might as well stay the course and get three. If you shop around a bit you can find a nice used Woodsman in your price range. As always, JMHO.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Can i play the devil's advocate? Colt parts are going to be expensive and harder to come by....so I have been told, and that's
assuming that there will be a need to do repairs. And, am I going to pay such a premium for the colt name that this is going to make it very hard to stay within my budget? Here's a beaut but not a bid yet:
Colt Woodsman Match Target 22 LR. 4 1/2" : Semi Auto Pistols at GunBroker.com
I'm trying to be practical.
 

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If you are trying to be "practical," then do not buy anything. Spend the money on ammunition and develop your skills with the guns you will use for defensive purposes.

"Practical" does not usually apply with many of our gun purchases. Once you have a handgun, rifle and shotgun, what more do you REALLY need? These boards are populated with people who are being anything BUT practical! Is it really "practical" to have several hundred guns? (Forget barter and investment issues when considering that.)

Forget "practical" and buy the best Colt Match Target you can afford. (You have linked to one of the more expensive versions of the Match Target, a Second Model 4.5-inch. There are less expensive choices.) They usually do not need parts in several lifetimes, and, if yours does, parts are available. Just buy several extra magazines and you and your family will never "need' anything else.

An alternative is to buy a Conversion Unit for your Model of 1911 and then you can shoot rimfire with it.
 

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You really can't compare the quality of a Ruger to a Woodsman. Even a lowly Challenger will outlast you and meet your requirements. Find a '50's - '60's version in nice condition and live happily ever after.
 

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Agree with the above as I like both the conversion unit and a woodsman series 22. The conversion unit will cost at least $400 these days on up. You can find a challenger or huntsman/targetsman for that same price or less if worn. Tough choice but if you really like the feel of the govt. 45 then I would lean towards the conversion unit. It is really like 2 guns in one. The new on the market Colt 22 govt. are OK but the "gold cup" version I shot had a very hard trigger pull which is no where like a true Colt cup.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
judge, Glad to know that you know it. The second model short barrel is just imprinted in my head.
I'm fighting it. I can't really afford what I want. May I try an analogy. I used to play a lot of golf. I was one of the hold outs
for the metal woods. I couldn't shape the shot as well; i didn't like the ping of metal; and a wood wood
gave me a great feeling when i hit it flush. Eventually, as longer shots with metal paid off i developed
a new association...maybe not quite as good, but close enough. So, maybe that's what I'm trying to
get with a ruger. The look of the ruger is not part of the traditional imprinting but the local range master, who has
won a lot of matches, gives it high praises. Of course,he owns about 100 guns. As for your discourse on practicality, well said.
 

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High Standard mk l revolver.Was only made a couple yrs in 70's. Hard to find, with sights (or at all). Will lock up tight, like only a Colt. Made in Ct. too. Quality gun.
 

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wphil, you should buy the Ruger.


As a fairly hard core Colt junkie, I kind of hate to say it, but there it is. And the Woodsman is one of my favorite models of Colt pistols!!

I own several Colt Woodsman second series Sport models (4.5" barrels), a 4.5" Challenger, a 4.5" second series Match Target, and an early 1950s vintage .22 Conversion Unit that I use on several receivers. I also own a Ruger Mk.II with a 4.5" barrel. I like all of these guns.

Based on your original post, for your identified purposes, I would have to say go with the Ruger, either current production Mk. III or a clean used Mk. II, Mk. I or "Standard Auto". The Ruger is less costly, more reliable and "headache free". The Ruger does not have the same flair and elegance as the Colt to be sure, but it also is unlikely to give you any unessessary "drama" or other BS. I will say that the trigger pull on the Colts is vastly superior to that on the Ruger that I have, a Mk. II circa 1989.
 

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I have owned and liked several Browning Buckmarks. One of the silhouette models with ten inch barrel shot as well as any Colt or Smith & Wesson I've ever tried. I also have a Kimber conversion unit on a 1911A1 Colt frame that works well, and just bought a Smith & Wesson M&P 22 that I like quite a lot. Lots of choices out there. One other factor for me is that I like to have a multiple magazines for each pistol (at least six and usually more). Modern production guns use mags that are quite reasonably priced.
I like Woodsman pistols, too and owned many of them. The quality and appearance is wonderful, but for general use I prefer a modern pistol that I can get parts and magazines for.

- - - Buckspen
 

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Discussion Starter #12
charlene,

Appreciate your commentary. may buy new a "target" model with bull barrel, stainless. mach 3. It's available. 435.00 to order(and wait) or 415 two hours away. I still would have to add a new trigger...which means 150.00 more. A good trigger is really important...at least, as a novice that's my impression.

A local good ole boy who used to do a lot of match competition picked that one out for me...but adds that Hi standards are out there in good condition and will not get the same premium as a colt. 4-500.00. He likes this mfg. Then again, he agrees that at matches he recalls that the target ruger beat a lot of guys with nicer looking pistols. I just called a dealer who goes to auctions. I told him to be on the look out for any one of the guns mentioned here.

In Michigan, here's an interesting Ruger:
https://www.proxibid.com/asp/LotDetail.asp?ahid=2463&aid=51559&lid=13146293#
This may give me an idea of what older Ruger's will go for. ..plus fees. Maybe the older ones do not need a new trigger?

Quality guns are in demand...looks like this guy may have aimed a little high in price. Nice gun but no bids:
Ruger Mark II .22 LR Government Target Model 22 : Semi Auto Pistols at GunBroker.com
 

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Look for a conversion unit, and have the same sights and trigger as your 1911. I've the Kimber version (new they are $350 w/ two magazines); while it ain't a Colt, I believe it is currently factory available. Mine shoots straight and has offered exactly zero functioning problems with CCIs or Federal Auto Match.
While I may have had the only lousy one ever made, the Ruger is not a bad pistol. The problem is different grip angle, sights and trigger if you are transitioning from one system to the other.
Moon
 

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I would get a Browning Medalist. It isn't cheap, but it is the pinnacle of that design. It was designed by John Browning's grandson, Bruce. It has an easier take down, removable barrel, rear sight that doesn't move with the slide, barrel weights, and a dry fire setting.
 

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wphil, I believe that you have the answer to your delemia. It is found in the facts stated in your opening comments in this thread. My wife is constantly accusing me of "trying to convince myself of something that I already know". My gun collection consists of mostly Colt products. However, I have owned several Ruger Mark I, II, and III's. I just recently picked up my second Mark III Hunter in SS with Cocobolo stocks. (i Had traded my first Mark III Hunter for an 8" Python shooter). In the back of my mind I had always regretted trading that particular gun off thinking I probably could have found a way to have kept the Ruger and still get the 8" Python. The Ruger Mark III Hunter or Target models are fun, accurate, and very reliable. Ruger is awesome when it comes to Customer Service and the guns are made in the USA. Sooooo with all that being said, re-read your opening comments and get the Ruger for now untill the right Colt, High Standard or other Target .22 comes along that you cannot live without. It has been my experiance that if taken care of, Ruger's loose very little value when used as a trade in's. Hey, just my two cents. This time My .22 Hunter will not be leaving my collection of firearms.....God Bless & have a great day. One last thought, For $600 you would most likely be able to purchase the Ruger semi-auto, a fine leather Ruger holster to go with it, gas in the car to get to the gun store, and maybe even a little extra ammo.
 

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Browning Medalist are very nice pistols. I've had two or three of them. They shoot great and are very handsome. On the other hand, some shooters don't like the grip angle, parts are somewhat hard to find (and expensive) and original magazines are very hard to find and quite expensive. Buckmarks shoot just as good, have a "straighter" grip angle, and magazines and parts are readily available.
Just my 2 cents worth.

- - - Buckspen
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The three .22 shooters that show up the most in discussion of which is the most enjoyed for target shooting:
colt woodsman, ruger's, hi standard, and sw model 41. But I will keep my mind open to Browning...are parts available?
Meanwhile, here's a high standard victor that is available for 550.00. I have to drive to see it, so they sent me pics. Disheartened when first described as "like new." Local gunsmith said, "do you want to buy a '55 chevy(hi standard) or
a brand new cadilac (ruger)? He's a tell like it is good ole boy. For a vintage gun, he considers that to be a second piece and he prefers the colt for reliability. Everyone has an opinion and they sound so spot on. View attachment 22463 View attachment 22464 View attachment 22465
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I have to shoot the ruger to know which one, if any, speaks to me. Variables: weight and length of barrel.
I think that I prefer 5.5inch barrel, steel bottom and top frame for better balance, bull barrel..fluted is just cosmetics?,
and stainless (easier cleaning?), adjustable rear sights, fixed front sights. Available at store 2 hrs away 418.00.
As for the Victor, if i shoot it I buy it. Gunsmith said that it has worked on plenty of these....contrary to reports that they last forever...and that the parts are expensive.
 

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Hi-Standard pistols are very nice and the Victor is one of the best. But they have the same problems as the Colts and Browning Medalist; parts and magazines are expensive and may be hard to find.
For a gun what you are going to shoot a lot, I would buy a Ruger, Browning Buckmark or any of the larger commercially available pistols on the market today. If you are only going to shoot infrequently, any of the guns discussed previously in this thread will work for you.
Finish, barrel length, sights and other features are individual choices and what I like is not necessarily what you will like. Handle a number of different guns and buy the one that feels good to you.

- - - Buckspen
 

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Dollar for dollar, the Ruger cannot be beat....
They are Accurate, Reliable, and Priced Reasonably....
I shot a MkII in competition (once the trigger was done correctly), and it is hard to beat....My S&W 41 was a great gun, but new ones are 3x the price of a Ruger.
Buy a MARVEL conversion for the 1911 frame....very accurate (Magazines are expensive)....but the grip is the same.
Ultimately, I went to the Pardini for competition....finest .22 I ever shot....







Terry



Here are the guns.....
 
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