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Just bought a series 70 from 2018, the model number is 0970A1CS, and serial number is 73B27XX.

So what is the correct terminology to use when referring to it.
Is it a reproduction, re-introduction, or just a series 70.
I know the finish is not as finely polished as the ones from the 70's, were there any other changes?

Charlie

 

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Beautiful pistol indeed; several years ago I owned a Series 70 dated 1979.
 

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Below my 1979 GCNM MkIV Series 70 above my 1985 GCNM MkIV Series 70.



I would not get too fanatic over the collet or "finger" barrel bushing in a Series 70. Below are two GCNM MkIV Series 80 pistols both made in 1988 and both have the the collet or finger barrel bushing. I think Colt used it till at least 1989 and maybe longer.



Besides the big differences like sights, triggers, stocks and cocking serrations moved to the rear there are some other differences and yes the collet or "finger" bushing is one. Actually the cocking serrations were moved to the rear in the 1992 Enhanced versions and have remained there. I thought the lack of a true half cock was interesting. The hammer has a "quarter shelf" which means one can pull it back a little and it locks but pull the trigger and the hammer will drop. The 1985 also has a Titanium firing pin by the way. The price on these did not change much. I paid about $1.1K for the 1985 new but if I inflate the $369 I paid new for the 79 in 79 it equals about $1.2K in 2015 dollars.

And I call my 2018 Gold Cup Lite in 38 Super a Series 70. Actually I don't think any of the current Gold Cup models have the Series 80 mechanical firing pin safety in them.


 

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just curious.....do they break the lettering on the slides like they did on the old 70Series and the first couple years of the Series 80s?
I sent in a New Frontier SAA in 1991 to be refinished and barrel change, and while on the phone got to talk to someone in the shop who told me they had stopped "breaking" the lettering- involved some kind of belt buffer or something- as a cost saving measure. I told him wouldn't save much if you lose sales, cause some folks are not gonna be happy.
surprisingly, they didn't listen to me ...
 

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Just bought a series 70 from 2018, the model number is 0970A1CS, and serial number is 73B27XX.

So what is the correct terminology to use when referring to it.
Is it a reproduction, re-introduction, or just a series 70.
I know the finish is not as finely polished as the ones from the 70's, were there any other changes?

Charlie

I would call it a re-introduction.
 

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I would think "2018 Colt Series 70 Government Model" sums everything up nicely. :)

I think a big problem is that people are using "Series 70" to denote whether the gun has a firing pin safety. I've seen many advertisements for a "Colt Series 70" for what really is a Colt 1911 Classic. And Colt isn't helping much by saying a gun has a "Series 70 firing system". It's right next to the "it's not a clip, it's a magazine" discussion.
 

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Hmm. I've heard about them breaking for decades, never seen one or known anyone who had that happen. Finish was nicer back when they broke the lettering and didn't leave it all jaggedy-assed and rough looking.
I gotta go with this,I’ve been shooting the 1911 Colt since the early 70s. I’ve not seen this happen, not saying it couldn’t happen but it has to be rare! I have worked on 1911 Colts since this time also,and I’d like to dispel the BS about a 70 series have an easier trigger to refine then an 80 series. Yes,the 80 has the firing pin safety etc but I can make a clean 3# pull on an 80 series as well as a 70 series,I guarantee if you were blindfolded you would never tell the difference! Yes it is more difficult to work the 80 series because of the extra parts but that’s it. I applaud Colt for trying to improve the safety of the product,even if only to appease a super litigious
society in which we live. Flame away. Pete
 
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As a gunsmith, I have encountered more Series 70 guns that didn't work than any other era of Colt 1911. Everyone used to say it was the Series 80 guns that were lower quality, mostly because that's when they started using cast parts. But most Series 80 guns, while not as pretty, worked just fine. I made a good amount of money getting Series 70 guns working.
 

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I gotta go with this,I’ve been shooting the 1911 Colt since the early 70s. I’ve not seen this happen, not saying it couldn’t happen but it has to be rare! I have worked on 1911 Colts since this time also,and I’d like to dispel the BS about a 70 series have an easier trigger to refine then an 80 series. Yes,the 80 has the firing pin safety etc but I can make a clean 3# pull on an 80 series as well as a 70 series,I guarantee if you were blindfolded you would never tell the difference! Yes it is more difficult to work the 80 series because of the extra parts but that’s it. I applaud Colt for trying to improve the safety of the product,even if only to appease a super litigious
society in which we live. Flame away. Pete
I've not seen it either; my guess is that it happened a few times, and then the stories about them went viral.

I've not had any problems with triggers on either a Series 70 or Series 80. I do like the short triggers of the Series 70, but perhaps that's because my fingers are short. Even though the Series 80 does have more parts, it's not bad.

Both are good guns.
 

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Just an addition... there is one thing about the original Series 70s I don't care for. The originals were blued, but for some odd reason, the trigger had a satin nickel finish. I'm not sure why this was done, but it just looks strange to me. Still, it didn't keep me from buying one. :)
 
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