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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Series 80 Colt MkIV Gold Cup National Match serial No. SN205XXE. It has what I can only describe as a 'Rube Goldberg' arrangement for the sear. It involves a very small spring. I tried to replace the trigger for a shorter one once and was lucky not to lose the spring. I had to take it to a Colt Gunsmith to have it reassembled. Is there any way to replace this mechanism with a standard type sear? Will standard parts fit in it correctly? Does it require a larger sear to compensate for the lever? Any help would be greatly appreciated. CC
 

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This is one of the minuses of buying a target pistol. It was specifically built for target shooting, and to have the absolutely best possible trigger.

In order to give that good trigger, the Gold Cup sear and hammer notches are cut to a finer engagement.
Without the depressor and spring to add additional tension on the sear, it may bounce out of engagement with the hammer and drop to half cock.

That drop will batter and damage the sear and hammer notches, ruining the trigger pull.

If you remove the parts you will likely have problems with "sear bounce" and hammer-follow, with the attendant sear and hammer damage.

You can probably have the sear and hammer replaced to eliminate the depressor and spring, BUT unless the gun is worked over by a really GOOD pistolsmith, the trigger will not be nearly as good.

A simple solution is to use a "slave pin" during reassembly.
Just put the sear, the depressor, and the spring together, and hold them with a short pin that is no wider than the sear.

When reassembling the sear pin, the pin will push the slave pin out the other side, leaving everything properly assembled.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you dfariswheel! There is no question the gun has a fine trigger and letoff. My problem is that I have always fit a 1911 just fine if it had the short trigger as I have relatively small hands. The GCNM is a wonderful gun but unfortunately has a long trigger. I essentially wind up pulling on the edge. It was my ignorance to think I could just break it down like all the other 1911s I had experienced. Your suggestion about the slave pin sounds like a great solution. I will employ it if I ever have the nerve or the need to enter the innards again. I think that I had best leave well enough alone. Thanks again for your courteous and informative response.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
dfariswheel,
Thanks for the tip. You continue to be a tremendous source of information on Colts.
Ben
 
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