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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My brother has had one of these for years. He shoots it every so often up at his cabin. He recently told me he never cleaned it ! I volunteered. It was a mess. The firing pin and spring actually had rust on them. I cleaned both very good but now I am wondering if its a better idea to just replace. If I do are the firing pins a drop in replacement ? Best place to purchase a quality pin and spring ?
 

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An extra-power return spring and/or a titanium firing pin will help prevent the possibility that a loaded weapon will fire if dropped. Not a likely scenario to begin with, as it would have to impact the ground with X amount of force at X angle to happen, but as the chance does exist the extra-power spring at the very least is added peace of mind.

And just because you asked (or intended to), in a pre-Series 80 Colt .45 you can use either Series 70 or 80 firing pins. Other 1911-type pistols might use a different size however, the .38/9mm for example.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Excellent thanks. I'm glad I asked. He doesnt take great care of it so replacing a rusty spring and pin seemed prudent. Parts ordered.
 

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Titanium tends to work harden from impact vibrations and then shatters like glass. That is one reason that titanium hammers which at one time were very popular with competitive shooters can no longer be found at all. One does see some titanium firing pins but they should be avoided for all except competition.

The real advantage of the HD firing pin spring is that as a standard wears, the firing pin with dimple a primer on a round being fed into the chamber when the slide is released. A HD version prevents that expecially if you are using a new or heavier than new recoil spring which Wolff also supplies. That's why he includes a new firing pin spring with all his recoil springs. If you want to test your FP spring when installed, point the gun in a safe direction and install a fully loaded magazine. Withdraw the slide and lock it on the slide stop. Release the slide stop. Then remove the mag and retract the slide and examine the round that has just been ejected. If your standard spring has lost it's ability to any degree, you will see a slight mark on the primer. If you do, it's time for a new spring of any type.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks guys. The rust was pretty bad on the spring and pin. I gave him my dads WWII 1911. He is my late fathers namesake so I thought he should have it. I asked him to bring that over too to give it an oiling. He hasnt touched it in the 17 years that have passed since I gave it to him. He also has a nice little Colt .25 auto that had not been cleaned. Took that apart and gave it a going thru. He said last time he shot it there were FTF's . Probably need to find a new mag spring or even a "new" mag. Hopefully i can get them to the range when he gets the parts and see how they operate.
 
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