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I'm one of them people that for some reason, Cannot get used to bifocal eyeglasses. I have tried the line, & no line types, without success, Therefore I have a pair of reading glasses, & a pair of "far away" ones.


My question to you glasses wearing shooters is, do you recommend using the reading glasses for a clear sight picture ( with the target being blurry ) or distance glasses, that I can see the target clearly, but the sight picture is not so clear.--- This is for target shooting only, not hunting.
 

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Your focal length in your prescription for shooting a pistol should be at the front sight, get a sharp sight picture and let the target go blurry. My everyday walking around glasses are tri-focals. The big part of the lens is for most occasions further out, below the first line is for intermediate range which includes my computer and front pistol sight, and the bottom is for reading or closeup work. By having that intermediate prescription in my everyday glasses I am able to defend myself if need be without changing glasses. If I am shooting skeet I use a plano lens for far vision, if I am target shooting a pistol I use a single lens with front sight as the focal point. My optometrist understands shooting now and is able to set the prescription right where I need it. A number of years back FBI instructors at the academy noticed the problem with aging agents and came up with a set of glasses with the shooting focal length bifocal on the top quarter of the lens, which brought it into play when putting your head down to view the sights but otherwise you would never notice the bifocal. I recommend finding an optometrist who understands shooting and they will be able to get you on target.
 
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Hi Rusty, and this is a great question by the way.

In order to hit a target with a handgun the rule is: You must have a clear, in-focus front sight. That leaves you with only one choice. Your reading glasses.

In order to be able to hit a target with a rifle. You, at the very least, need to be able to see your sights clearly.

It's no more complicated that that.

Bud
ps
I wrote my reply before reading any of the others and Mr. Hayes up there (clearly another long time firearms instructor) said it much more eloquently than I.



I'm one of them people that for some reason, Cannot get used to bifocal eyeglasses. I have tried the line, & no line types, without success, Therefore I have a pair of reading glasses, & a pair of "far away" ones.


My question to you glasses wearing shooters is, do you recommend using the reading glasses for a clear sight picture ( with the target being blurry ) or distance glasses, that I can see the target clearly, but the sight picture is not so clear.--- This is for target shooting only, not hunting.
 

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I don't know how much correction you have, but I only have to use glasses for reading or up close work. With about 2.5 diopters of correction for reading I found that a 1.0 diopter gave me enough close vision to see the sights while still leaving the target sharp enough for shooting out to 50 yards. Go by your local Walgreens and just try a pair to see if they work for you. Won't cost you anything to check.
 

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Really? how is it possible to have two targets at different distances in focus at the same time? How do you accomplish that?

I'm assuming you mean that the target must not be perfectly clear though, right?

Bud


I don't know how much correction you have, but I only have to use glasses for reading or up close work. With about 2.5 diopters of correction for reading I found that a 1.0 diopter gave me enough close vision to see the sights while still leaving the target sharp enough for shooting out to 50 yards. Go by your local Walgreens and just try a pair to see if they work for you. Won't cost you anything to check.
 

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I don't know how much correction you have, but I only have to use glasses for reading or up close work. With about 2.5 diopters of correction for reading I found that a 1.0 diopter gave me enough close vision to see the sights while still leaving the target sharp enough for shooting out to 50 yards. Go by your local Walgreens and just try a pair to see if they work for you. Won't cost you anything to check.
I'm going to have to try that. I use 2.5 magnification for reading also.

About 4 years ago I found that I was having problems seeing the front sight when shooting handguns. My distance vision is excellent. When trying different things I realized that although I am right handed I am left eye dominant. Now, my eyes are 20/20 left eye and 20/30 right eye. I was never been able to shoot with both eyes open. I retrained myself to shoot right handed, left eye, or left eye with both eyes open. This seems to work well for me.
It really didn't take as long as I thought to retrain myself. However, I'm retired and I've got lots of time, and ammo. Last spring I decided to shoot a handgun with the right eye using reading glasses at about 10-12 yds. As mentioned above, the sights were clear but the target was blurry - but I did shoot a good target.

Iron rifle sights using right hand/ right eye is no problem - for now.
 

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I don't know how much correction you have, but I only have to use glasses for reading or up close work. With about 2.5 diopters of correction for reading I found that a 1.0 diopter gave me enough close vision to see the sights while still leaving the target sharp enough for shooting out to 50 yards. Go by your local Walgreens and just try a pair to see if they work for you. Won't cost you anything to check.
I'm going to have to try that.

I use 2.5 magnification for reading also. About 4 years ago I found that I was having problems seeing the front sight when shooting handguns. My distance vision is excellent. When trying different things I realized that although I am right handed I am left eye dominant. Now, my eyes are 20/20 left eye and 20/30 right eye. I was never been able to shoot with both eyes open. I retrained myself to shoot right handed, left eye, or left eye with both eyes open. This seems to work well for me. It really didn't take as long as I thought to retrain myself. However, I'm retired and I've got lots of time, and ammo. Last spring I decided to shoot a handgun with the right eye using reading glasses at about 10-12 yds. As mentioned above, the sights were clear but the target was blurry - but I did shoot a good target.
Iron rifle sights using right hand/ right eye is no problem - for now.
 

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Hi Malysh;

Ya know in my particular circle of training we have a mantra. It goes like this. Draw, push the gun up into your line of sight, and say "front sight" "front sight" "front sight" "front sight" "front sight" "front sight""front sight" until the trigger breaks.

I've had a gun out of its holster three different times, (not while target shooting) and that's all I think about when I see that clear, in-focus front sight on my target.

Bud


I'm going to have to try that. I use 2.5 magnification for reading also.

About 4 years ago I found that I was having problems seeing the front sight when shooting handguns. My distance vision is excellent. When trying different things I realized that although I am right handed I am left eye dominant. Now, my eyes are 20/20 left eye and 20/30 right eye. I was never been able to shoot with both eyes open. I retrained myself to shoot right handed, left eye, or left eye with both eyes open. This seems to work well for me.
It really didn't take as long as I thought to retrain myself. However, I'm retired and I've got lots of time, and ammo. Last spring I decided to shoot a handgun with the right eye using reading glasses at about 10-12 yds. As mentioned above, the sights were clear but the target was blurry - but I did shoot a good target.

Iron rifle sights using right hand/ right eye is no problem - for now.
 

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Really? how is it possible to have two targets at different distances in focus at the same time? How do you accomplish that?

I'm assuming you mean that the target must not be perfectly clear though, right?

Bud
Let me try to explain it a different way. When I didn't wear glasses I could see the sights clearly or I could see the target clearly, but not both at the same time. As I started to need reading glasses I could still see the target clearly, but couldn't see the sights clearly at any time. With the reading glasses on I could see the sights clearly, but not the target. The 1.0 diopter glasses allowed me to again see the sights and the target fairly clearly, but not at the same time, so I focus on the sights and let the target go slightly out of focus as I did when I could see both without any correction.
 

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Aaaahhhhh now I understand. Thanks Johnny, your explanation now makes perfect sense. Even to me.:)

Bud

Let me try to explain it a different way. When I didn't wear glasses I could see the sights clearly or I could see the target clearly, but not both at the same time. As I started to need reading glasses I could still see the target clearly, but couldn't see the sights clearly at any time. With the reading glasses on I could see the sights clearly, but not the target. The 1.0 diopter glasses allowed me to again see the sights and the target fairly clearly, but not at the same time, so I focus on the sights and let the target go slightly out of focus as I did when I could see both without any correction.
 

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Another option is to get a Merit type adjustable aperture that attaches to your glass lens.
This "peep" device forces your eye to focus better on the front sight and gives a clearer sight picture. A lot of competitive shooters use these. You can buy them from Brownell's, Sinclair, and other places that cater to target shooters.

As an experiment to see if it might work for you, just put a pin hole in a piece of paper and tape it to your lens.

However, by far and away the best possible option is to buy dedicated shooting glasses. This is what serious shooters do.
You need a set of single vision glasses that sharply focus on the front sight.
Talk to your optometrist about what you need and most any of them can set you up.
My doctor had me hold a thin ruler sideways at arms length to simulate a sight and he adjusted the prescription to that focal length.
My buddy's doctor is also a shooter and he had my bud actually bring a rifle in the office so they could get the best focus.

He also did one thing I hadn't thought of. He made the LEFT lens a distance prescription.
This allows a clear look at distant targets and markers to insure you're shooting on the proper target and not cross shooting.
Since you focus on the sights with the right eye, your master eye ignores the left lens when shooting.

Single vision glasses don't cost that much and you can buy frames that are better for shooting, like the excellent "Shooter" type B&L metal frames.
My buddy got his prescription and sent it to a doctor who specializes in shooting glasses. He had him make up a frame with interchangeable lenses in various colors. He has yellow, brown, clear, and polarized sunglass lenses for any shooting condition.
Also, your doctor can shift the focal point on the lens to the upper left corner where you look when sighting a rifle.
For a pistol, it's usually centered in the lens.
 

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I am confident that anyone of any age can make a few changes, which will eventuate in their Vision improving.

I tried a few things myself, and, my Vision improved a great deal.

A couple years ago, I could not read a Book without holding it at Arm's ength, and, I could not pass the Driver's Licence Vision Test, without Glasses.

Now, I can ( and did ) pass the DMV 'Vision' Test without Glasses, and, I can read very small print holding it about ten inches from my Eyes.


My near vision if vastly better, my mid distance vision is good, and my far vision is good. A couple years ago, all three were poor and getting worse.


This improvement resulted from some naïve experiments with Diet, which I would be happy to share ( in no more than a few brief short paragraphs ) if anyone is interested.

I am 59 years old, and for most of that time, I had a usual American Diet for our time.

Now my diet is more like what a usual American Diet was like, 80 years ago.
 

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There is a very in depth chapter in: "Military and Sporting Rifle Shooting;" by Edward C. Croosman; copyright 1932 by Small Arms Publishing Company: Chapter 17 "The Rifleman's Eyes."
Its been awhile since I read this, and I'm not sure how it will apply to handguns, but I do recall that it was very informative, and probably a bit dated. But I think that the secret is to find an optometrist that is also a shooter.
 

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Allan Lehman, in Dewey, AZ is a recognized expert who specializes in making and fitting prescription shooting glasses for specific shooting requirements. He's been around for several years and used to attend and set up at some of the bigger shooting events...like Camp Perry and Vandalia. He's been the topic of a few gun magazine articles.
 

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I am confident that anyone of any age can make a few changes, which will eventuate in their Vision improving.I tried a few things myself, and, my Vision improved a great deal.A couple years ago, I could not read a Book without holding it at Arm's ength, and, I could not pass the Driver's Licence Vision Test, without Glasses.Now, I can ( and did ) pass the DMV 'Vision' Test without Glasses, and, I can read very small print holding it about ten inches from my Eyes.My near vision if vastly better, my mid distance vision is good, and my far vision is good. A couple years ago, all three were poor and getting worse.This improvement resulted from some naïve experiments with Diet, which I would be happy to share ( in no more than a few brief short paragraphs ) if anyone is interested.I am 59 years old, and for most of that time, I had a usual American Diet for our time.Now my diet is more like what a usual American Diet was like, 80 years ago.
I would love to hear it. My arms arent long enough anymore at 57 and I must lose 3 pairs of readers a month !
 

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The three secrets to shooting accurately are:Front sightFront sightFront sightAt least that is what Kid Sopris taught me
 

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I wear bifocals without a line. The target and the front sight are always blurry, but my groups are OK.

Dfariswheen has a great suggestion that I shall take to my eye doctor with me (along with a revolver) next time I visit.
 

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The October issue of Shooting Times has an article about shooting one-handed. This places the front sight out further, and in better focus for some shooters. This technique has aided my target shooting considerably. I use a 1.25 diopter for reading and require no correction for long distance.
 

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I found that a 1.0 diopter gave me enough close vision to see the sights while still leaving the target sharp enough for shooting out to 50 yards. Go by your local Walgreens and just try a pair to see if they work for you. Won't cost you anything to check.
This is what I do for handgun shooting is using a 1.0, do I can easily see the front sight and target without it being blurry. It also works for rifle but I can still see the front sight without correction on a rifle at 52 years of age.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for all the helpful responses, I'm going out tomorrow to sight in my new X&X 15-22--- I will XX out the actual Maker, As this is the COLT forum, Although, I do see a lot of you guys on that other forum
 
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