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Greeting Fellow Colt Shooters,
I am fascinated with the Colt 1920’s to 1930’s line oftarget revolvers and pistols. Obviously, earlier Colt Police Positives andOfficer target models are safe with the hyper-velocity loads, (Stinger 1640, 32 grain)even in those revolvers with non-recessed heads in the cylinders. Mention hasbeen made of case ruptures, but I have never had that experience. All Colts are checked by a good gunsmith.
Now, I’ve recently purchased a 1938 Colt Ace, and it workswell with the high velocity, and the hyper velocity, BUT many of the bettergrades of foreign ammo, such as SK (German), Eley, and the Norma match-22, do not function the simple blow-back action of the Colt Ace. The dirty and cheap Remington 22 thunderbolt has the dual qualities of best groups and the ammunition which necessitates cleaning the most often.
My question, do you remove some of the leather washers to reduce the high tension of the spring in the Colt Ace? Cut the recoil spring? How about the post-1933 Woodsmen? Is alteration of the spring possible? The Ace has a highly milled slide, but I doubt that damage can occur.
Nothing, of course, can beat a Colt for accuracy. I am open to any helpful suggestions from shooters or those familiar with these models.
Thanks, Thad
 

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This question brings to mind the old joke: "Patient: Doc, it hurts when I do this. Doc's Answer: Then don't do that."

If your guns will not work with those (expensive) brands of ammunition, then why use them? Neither of the Colts you mention will deliver intrinsic accuracy that can take advantage of such premium ammunition. Use what works instead of trying to modify the guns to work with the ammunition you mention.

That said, if you still want to use that ammunition, buy different recoil springs and start cutting them until the guns function with the ammunition you desire.
 

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In the 1950's folks found that a helluva lot can beat a Colt for accuracy - including the relatively inexpensive Rugers - today, there are even more to deal with.

If you're shooting a Pre-War, then shoot yours with Standard Velocity or High Velocity (if the correct mainspring's installed) - and stay away from the more expensive and exotic stuff made for the Match pistols of today.

Replicate what it was designed for and I'll bet your accuracy improves.

That'll hold true for all of the older revolvers, as well - Hyper-Velocity desires notwithstanding, the older ones shoot best with what was available during their heyday.

So, before fiddling with different springs, give that ammunition a try.

Also - if you're planning on shooting them much, do yourself a favor and replace all of the springs - the originals are getting pretty tuckered, and new springs will give you back the 'snap' the piece originally had.
 

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Greeting Fellow Colt Shooters,
Now, I’ve recently purchased a 1938 Colt Ace, and it works well with the high velocity, and the hyper velocity, BUT many of the better grades of foreign ammo, such as SK (German), Eley, and the Norma match-22, do not function the simple blow-back action of the Colt Ace. The dirty and cheap Remington 22 thunderbolt has the dual qualities of best groups and the ammunition which necessitates cleaning the most often.
My question, do you remove some of the leather washers to reduce the high tension of the spring in the Colt Ace? Cut the recoil spring? The Ace has a highly milled slide, but I doubt that damage can occur.
Thanks, Thad
TJM,

Just checked the ACE instruction sheet (Form A-106) that was shipped with the pistols. It notes, "Regular and high Speed Ammunition" (ammunition available from 1931 through the 40's, however, modern ammunition, most likely, would be acceptable). The ACE instructions do not discuss the purpose of the leather buffers.

Many years ago, from and old collector, it was explained that the buffers were used to tune the recoil to the user preferred (used) ammunition. The energy in the ammunition used has to be sufficient to fully eject the brass, and then, the recoil spring has to have enough stored energy to pick up the next round and fully close the slide. Removing buffers helps ejection using lower energy ammunition. Sometimes, removing too many buffers, prevents the slide from completely closing (or being reliable during the cycling process).

Do not recommend cutting the recoil spring.

Best Regards,
 

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With .22s, I've often found the best accuracy is from the lowest velocity. And that each gun shoots best with different ammo. You have to try a few types, and take notes. Anything that doesn't break the sound barrier is usually pretty accurate.

As far as high velocity, I stay away from it in all my .22s, because they're all antiques and I want them to last as long as possible. It's reported a few High Standard automatics from the 1950s are now starting to crack, due to the steels used and the use of high velocity. More velocity means more wear on the rifling lands, more noise, more frame battering, etc. Just shoot standard.
 
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