Colt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
If I can figure out how to post pictures, and can dig the holsters up, I’ll show you a couple of mine. They were my great grandfathers, in which he carried his factory engraved SAA when he worked “deep East Sixth” street in Austin back in the 40’s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Little Johns has this Brill Holster with a 1903 in their July 29th auction.

View attachment 577167
That's funny. The holster is a DA revolver Brill; auto Brills always are scooped at the trigger guard to expose the trigger itself. Not an uncommon mistake -- they can interchange -- but in those days (1910ish to 1950ish) it was inconceivable to cover the trigger. So a modern frame of mind, put those two items together; but not Brill. Likely a 4" K frame; their holsters were very tight-fitting and almost dainty.

This one is from Brill's earliest period, so 1910ish to 1930ish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Can anyone add pictures of there A.W. Brill holsters. I like them but they don't show up that often.

Also a revolver Brill, this one from Brill's late period 1930ish to 1950ish. It's for a 6" revolver and it's not uncommon for automatics to fit in revolver holsters; but as mentioned, Brills for automatics always exposed the trigger and it was expected that it would be, in that era.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
That's funny. The holster is a DA revolver Brill; auto Brills always are scooped at the trigger guard to expose the trigger itself. Not an uncommon mistake -- they can interchange -- but in those days (1910ish to 1950ish) it was inconceivable to cover the trigger. So a modern frame of mind, put those two items together; but not Brill. Likely a 4" K frame; their holsters were very tight-fitting and almost dainty.

This one is from Brill's earliest period, so 1910ish to 1930ish.
So, in my post above, #8, you have just schooled me that my Brill is for an semi automatic. The million dollar question is which diminutive semi goes in my Brill?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
That's funny. The holster is a DA revolver Brill; auto Brills always are scooped at the trigger guard to expose the trigger itself. Not an uncommon mistake -- they can interchange -- but in those days (1910ish to 1950ish) it was inconceivable to cover the trigger. So a modern frame of mind, put those two items together; but not Brill. Likely a 4" K frame; their holsters were very tight-fitting and almost dainty.

This one is from Brill's earliest period, so 1910ish to 1930ish.
Thanks, I alway enjoy a good learning about these things.
 
  • Like
Reactions: thecoltguy

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
So, in my post above, #8, you have just schooled me that my Brill is for an semi automatic. The million dollar question is which diminutive semi goes in my Brill?
I expect, a .22 automatic. Very popularly holstered pistols for plinkers, small game hunters, etc. in those days. One without target sights tho. This holster is a 'late' 1932 - 1955 because it's hallmarks indicate it was made for Brill by N.J. Rabensburg, who did so precisely between those dates, at which point August had died, N.J. had retired, Arno was running Brillville (and by '63 no longer concerned much about holsters because his daughter was in the car with JFK and Jackie when the three shots rang out in Dallas). N.J. then died in '61 and Arno in '68.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Gorgeous. The one at left is the oldest, from before 1930. The Brill-style -- some that were owned by famous Rangers are from the Brill company but not marked Brill -- was created, it is believed, by slimming down the earlier King Ranch holster that had the very wide cuff shown on your oldest one and was quite bulky; in 1907 specifically for the Texas Rangers who were suddenly required to conceal their pistols and leave the long guns and cartridge belts at home, so to speak. It was not created for use in automobiles, contrary to another theory.

The style's maker changed in 1932 and, because the construction details of the two eras are distinctly different AND consistent, are divided into an 'early' and a 'late' era that ended 1961 (in an earlier post I used the chap's retirement date of 1955 but have since learned that he continued making them until his death, with and without the Brill mark on the cuff). Yours at far right I would expect to be for the SAA. The style was made by perhaps 18 others of which 12 have their makers' names marked on the cuff, and 6 that use different construction from each other yet are not marked. All were in a circle around Austin on an exacting 200 mile radius from the city; because of that and the consistency in their construction, it is believed that Capt. Hughes acted as a sort of Johnny Appleseed to have the holsters available for Rangers wherever they were stationed in Texas. The rare exception proves the rule: S.D. Myres was quite late to the party, not making the style until the 1930s; and he is not only well outside the circle to the West but also did not use the half liner of what is probably a book-binding leather (very thin) and did not place the cuff that encircles the body to form the lower half of a narrow belt loop tunnel. It is believed that August's son Arno Brill developed this holster and the rest of Myres' "Tom Threepersons Holsters" range for Myres.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
59 Posts
Very interesting Red, as always. Any idea when your book will be available? Also, Brill's daughter, Nellie, married John Connally and became the First Lady Of Texas for a number of years.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top