Colt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As time goes by the 90 day maintenance (oiling) is not much fun any more an seems more time consuming than it was 40 or so years ago.What I was wondering is why can't I just wipe them down with a silicone cloth.The house is in central N.Y.,is air conditioned in summer and of course heated in winter.Temp varys 65 to 80 degrees at most.Humidity is low,don't keep guns in the basement,but as arule nothing has ever rusted in the basement.
I would really like some input on this idea whether thru experience or conjecture.
Thanks a lot
George M.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
14,895 Posts
Silicone will do a good job under your conditions, but you still need to watch them closely.

You know lube works, but keep an eye on the silicone treatment until you KNOW everything's well protected.

I used to buy the silicone cloths to wipe off my precision instruments, until I found one tool with a scratch from a bit of grit in a dirty cloth.

After that, I bought good flannel at the sewing store, cut it into square cloths and bought automotive spray silicone to treat my own cloths.

As soon as they started to get a little dirty, I pitched them and made up another.

Be SURE to buy automotive NON-environmental silicone.
I once made the mistake of buying some environmental-friendly spray silicone, and it mildewed horribly in the bag.
Turns out the "friendly" stuff has water or something in it that molds and mildews.

Get the automotive solvent-based stuff, spray the cloth until well wetted, then allow it to air dry before putting it in a plastic zip lock bag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,216 Posts
Break Free CLP is also a excellent product. It can be purchased at your local Walmart in the sporting good section. Spray it on a flannel cloth and same method applies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Years ago I experimented with silicone instead of oil. I didn't have any bad experience but I decided that I just didn't like it.

At the time I was living in NJ in a house that was air conditioned and of course heated. I never had a problem with rust. I left a Marlin lever action rifle in a closet for 20 years and maybe oiled it once or twice and no rust. I did the same thing with a blue Series Seventy Colt and I never had any rust on that either. In recent years I've used Breakfree CLP. I make sure that any gun that gets handled also gets wiped down before putting it away. I clean after shooting any gun.

You sound like you have a relatively low risk environment for rust. If you experiment with longer periods between wipe downs you might find that you don't need to work as hard as you have.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
991 Posts
This is not a recommendation, just a comment from my personal experience. All of my revolvers were purchased in the last two years except one: a Ruger .22 single six. I purchased this new in 1995 just for some plinking and probably only shot it about ten times. I always cleaned after shooting and wiped down with three-in-one oil. This gun was stored in a bedroom closet in the original plastic bag and box for ten years without being touched and still looks as good as new. Like you, we have a good low humidity climate in our home.

I take more precaution with my new collection. I am a strong proponent for Blue Wonder's Armadillo http://www.bluewonder.us/BlueWonderArmadillo.html , however, it can be difficult to apply in "hard to get at" and grooved areas. I use Rig grease for these parts of the gun http://www.silencio.com/htfiles/chemicals.html and then I run a patch of 3-in-one oil through the bore and cylinders. After this process I store the firearms in Bore Store http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=1850 long term storage cases.

I feel very comfortable that my revolvers are well protected without regular maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I really appreciate the response,I think I will use the silicone cloth on several of the handguns an a few long guns,watch for a while and see what happens,am pretty sure the silicone is the way to go, but old Hoppes habits are hard to break.
Thanks again
George M.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
I've used nothing but well-saturated silicone cloths for many years now and never had a problem with rust. I live in SE Michigan, where the summers are very,very humid, and I do not have air conditioning.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,351 Posts
I once thought the silicone treated cloth would be great to wrap handguns for storage. What I ended up with was rusted guns. There was a brief period before my basement was properly sealed, and a dehumidifer installed, that caused me some rust problems with tools, and guns, in my basement workshop. The silicone treated cloth was, by far, the worst method I ever tried in 40+ years of owning guns. Wiping down with silicone gave very little protection, and wrapping in silicone cloth was a disaster. I'll stick with oil base products. You can't lose with Rig grease, or another of my favorites, Birchwood Casey's Sheath. Niether of these has ever failed me, but the silicone was a definite failure in my circumstances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,216 Posts
As long as your not along the ocean I feel that if you have a oiled gun in a safe with a golden rod that you won't have to worry about rust for a long time (1 year plus). The rod will remove all humidity and moisture. The oil is only preventive measures.

I was once told that a silicon cloth can be harmful to the finish so I stopped using them. I have no evidence of silicon being harmful, it's only hear say.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
A good friend of mine who is a county sheriff in Indiana participated in a corrosion test several years ago with the Fort Wayne Police Department similar to the one I am linking to this post. They were evaluating the corrosion inhibition properties of various oils to determine what to issue for use on their duty weapons. They used different types of nails in salt solutions in their test. They didn't test the Eezox product but they did test Break Free CLP, Hoppe's Oil, Rem Oil, motor oil, 3 in 1 oil, etc. and many others. Break Free came out on top with Rem Oil a distant second. I have used Break Free since then and have never had a gun rust. I do find that the smell of Break Free does take some getting used too, though.

http://www.6mmbr.com/corrosiontest.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
[ QUOTE ]
I once thought the silicone treated cloth would be great to wrap handguns for storage. What I ended up with was rusted guns. There was a brief period before my basement was properly sealed, and a dehumidifer installed, that caused me some rust problems with tools, and guns, in my basement workshop. The silicone treated cloth was, by far, the worst method I ever tried in 40+ years of owning guns. Wiping down with silicone gave very little protection, and wrapping in silicone cloth was a disaster. I'll stick with oil base products. You can't lose with Rig grease, or another of my favorites, Birchwood Casey's Sheath. Niether of these has ever failed me, but the silicone was a definite failure in my circumstances.

[/ QUOTE ]

Hmm. . .certainly a different take on it than mine. I've never actually wrapped guns in silicone cloth, though. Also, I wonder. . . there's some kind of silicone spray that's water-based (I think it's for rubber) that might lead to the problems you've encountered. All I know is that I have owned over a hundred guns in my lifetime, never used anything but silicone, and never had any rust.

Bill A
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,351 Posts
Hmm. . .certainly a different take on it than mine. I've never actually wrapped guns in silicone cloth, though. Also, I wonder. . . there's some kind of silicone spray that's water-based (I think it's for rubber) that might lead to the problems you've encountered. All I know is that I have owned over a hundred guns in my lifetime, never used anything but silicone, and never had any rust.

Bill A

[/ QUOTE ]

There are "food grade" silicone sprays that I suspect are the ones that may contain water. I used the "automotive" grade stuff, along with the silicone treated cloth. The silicone cloths I used were marketed by Hoppes, and Birchwood Casey, to be used with firearms, so I doubt if they would have used a water base silicone treatment. My use environment consisted of high humidity combined with temperature changes, so the conditions may been more severe than yours. The alarm bell was finding a gun on my workbench with the beginnings of rust, after about three weeks laying there wrapped in one of the cloths. A quick check of others I had in storage revealed more traces of rust. I will never trust silicone on another of my guns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
An article in Man At Arms described the technique that museums use to conserve their firearms collections, primarily the use of a wax such as Renaissance because it keeps moisture away from the metal, won't show fingerprints, and doesn't attract dust. Further, it won't react with nickel or other plated finishes such as silver or gold. I spent a few weeks doing this to all of the guns I don't shoot or handle on a regular basis, and can report that after a full four seasons, there is no detrimental affect.

I believe that a more recent article in The Rampant Colt echoed this technique.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
great read......I got alot of of all of this.

I also wanted to invite 11th ACR to stick around; its always a pleasure to see a brother in arms in our midts.

Hooah!

Lee
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
What about Mineral Oil? I was talking to a gunsmith who specializes in old guns and he told me to use nothing on my guns other then plain mineral oil. Anyone heard of that before?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I read about Renaissance Wax in the Rifleman about three years ago. I use it on all my guns and have not had a problem with rust. It works on blue, nickel, and stainless,

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
I've been using MPro-7 CLP on my handguns that are keep in my safe. It seems to protect really well and gives a nice looking finish as well. I also use eezox spray on my AR-15's as the spray gets into all the little hard to reach spaces, and it is a proven protectant against rust. A google search will yield several published salt spray test comparing all the major brands and how well they protect against rust. Breakfree clp and eezox are best for that, and they do provide some lubrication as well, although you may want to use some corrosionX oil for spot lubrication.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top