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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I bought one of the early production .22 Colt Single Action, which I recall as a Frontier Scout (?) that was the dual-tone finish, natural aluminum frame and grip frame, with blued steel cylinder, barrel and ejector assembly. Dandy little squirrel gun, by the way, nd still sorely missed. This around 1960 or so.

For the education of this old hand, what were the succeeding models and approximate dates, of that series, including the New Frontier .22s? And were the last ones steel framed?

Bob Wright

As a side note: My older brother was on a business trip in Mobile, Alabama and saw the model I wanted in a pawn shop. He called me about buying for me there, and I told him to do so. And he brought it back on the plane to Memphis. Long ago?
 

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I'm NOT an expert on the Colt .22 single actions but the progression was:

The Scout "Q" or "F" suffix. Aluminum frame. 1957 to 1970. .22 LR, .22 Magnum after 1960. Blue, duotone, or bright finish frame. 4 3/4" or 9 1/2' Buntline barrel, interchangeable cylinders after 1964.

Frontier Scout "K" suffix. Zamac (zinc) frame. 1960 to 1970. Blue or nickel finish.

Frontier Scout '62, "P" suffix. 1962 to 1970. Blue finish, Staglite grips.

Peacemaker 22 Scout. "G" and "L" prefix serials. 1970 to 1977. Color case hardened steel frame. 4.4", 4 3/4", 6", or 7 1/2" barrels. Interchangeable cylinders. 7 1/2" barrel models may be marked as Peacemaker or Buntline.

New Frontier 22 Scout. 1970 to 1977. Flat top frame with Accro adjustable rear sight ramp front. Reintroduced with a cross-bolt safety in .22LR only, from 1982 to 1986. All blue finish was standard after 1985.

Within the Scout versions Colt sold these with a variety of grips, barrel lengths, and finishes. LOTS of commemorative models were issued.
 

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First series had a Q suffix serial number, duotone finish 1957-58
F series, also in duotone 1958-61, as well as full blue 1958-71. Dual cylinders (.22 WMR) available starting in 1964
K series with a heavier alloy frame and nickel finish from 1960-70, also with dual cylinders available starting in 1964
P series (called "Frontier Scout '62") also with the heavier alloy frame, but midnight blue finish and staglite stocks from 1962-71, ditto dual cylinders
G series Peacemaker .22 and New Frontier .22 with steel CCH frame 1970-77
GS series New Frontier .22 with steel frame (CCH or full blue) and cross-bolt safety 1982-86

Lots of variations in stocks, barrel length (including Buntline versions), and commemoratives. Interesting little six guns to collect. Fun to shoot.

Reference is "Colt Scouts, Peacemakers and New Frontiers in .22 Caliber" by Don Wilkerson.

Bill
 

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I bought one of the early production .22 Colt Single Action, which I recall as a Frontier Scout (?) that was the dual-tone finish, natural aluminum frame and grip frame, with blued steel cylinder, barrel and ejector assembly. Dandy little squirrel gun, by the way, nd still sorely missed. This around 1960 or so.

For the education of this old hand, what were the succeeding models and approximate dates, of that series, including the New Frontier .22s? And were the last ones steel framed?

Bob Wright

As a side note: My older brother was on a business trip in Mobile, Alabama and saw the model I wanted in a pawn shop. He called me about buying for me there, and I told him to do so. And he brought it back on the plane to Memphis. Long ago?
Bob, good advice given above. If one owns one Scout or a few the Wilkerson book is invaluable and available from Carol Wilkerson and some other outlets. I've read that book cover to cover and still need to reference it frequently. Without a doubt the best book written on the subject.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you, Gentemen, for your replies and the information. I'm not into .22s except for a couple of squirrel guns, a Ruger Three Screw Single Six and a Uberti stallion.

The Scout that I had had the propensity of hitting where I looked and I do miss that. Traded it for a .22 Officers Model Match when I was in the bullseye target game.

Again, I thank ya'll for the response.

Bob Wright
 

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Bearcat is a fun gun, durable and reliable...

 

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Colt New Frontier .22s in the G224xxx serial number range were made in 1984-85. You can also tell by the "all blue" finish (instead of the earlier color case hardened frame) and the cross bolt safety button under the loading gate.

- - Buckspen
 

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Colt New Frontier .22s in the G224xxx serial number range were made in 1984-85. You can also tell by the "all blue" finish (instead of the earlier color case hardened frame) and the cross bolt safety button under the loading gate.

- - Buckspen
Thanks - gettin' old fades the memory somewhat.

Grandkids are going to like them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank ya'll for all the information and taking the time to respond.

That little Colt Scout seems to get fonder in my memory the further in the past it becomes. I have an aversion to aluminum alloys used in guns, yet that little Colt was nearly all alloy, innards, barrel and cylinder, excepted. And it was natural silver colored aluminum. But that little six shooter just felt Wright in my hands, pointed so well, and shot so pleasantly, and put game in my coat.

The most memorable shot I think I made was a a gray squirrel sitting on the ground in a gulley, in some gnarled oak roots. I fired for a head shot, my bullet going through both cheeks without breaking its jawbone. He was stunned enough I got off a second shot and killed it instantly.

Bob Wright
 

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Hey, my first post here on the Colt forum. I bought my first handgun in 1972 it was a Colt .22 NF 6" dual cylinder. Kept it for years and then traded it, still regret that! Now I have now found a .22 Peacemaker 4 3/4" gun with just the magnum cylinder. It is in great shape throughout. I do have acouple of questions about its finish. The components are finished as follows:
Main Frame CCH
Grip Frame Polished Aluminum
Cylinder Nickel Plated
Barrell Blue
Ejector Rod Niclkel Plated
Grips American Eagle

The serial number is G2545X.
From what I have read the gun was built in 1971. It is the only .22 Single Action that I have ever seen in this configuration. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks, Rowdy
 

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Welcome Rowdy. Your Peacemakers serial number does indeed reference to 1971. This is very good because that was the only year that Colt offered the gun in that rare 4-3/4" barrel length. Late 1971, Colt began using 4.4" (slightly shorter) barrels throughout the rest of production for the short barrel configuration. The 4.4" barrel is even length with the ejector rod housing where the 4-3/4" is just slightly longer. The bad news is that Colt did not make a magnum only peacemaker according to the reference book by Don Wilkerson. colt did produce a few 22LR only peacemakers, but they are rare and would need a Colt letter to prove that the magnum cylinder is not just missing. The refence book also informs that the standard finish on the G series revolvers are a case hardened frame, epoxy blue grip frame, and blued barrel and cylinders, and ejector housing. All the small parts and screws are also blued. Feel free to post photos and enjoy your Peacemaker.
 

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Not trying to high-jack the thread, but I didnt see no need starting a new thread for this. I was at a guy I know's house awhile back, and he was showing me a 1st SAA generation 22 Conversion (originally a 38-40) done by someone I cant remember the name of. I know the guy had his name on top of the barrel at the back and it started with a G and ended with Arms or Works... My memory is getting bad on some things. The barrel was original just polished down with stamping added to it, you still barely see where it was originally marked 38 if you looked very closely. I'm thinking it was like Gresham Arms or Greica Works or something like that. Does this ring a bell with anyone whom done a bunch of 22 conversions on SAA's??? I thought it was a very cool conversion gun, but I was fixated on a bunch of other beautiful SAA's and other stuff. That 22 keeps bugging me I cant think of the name.
 

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Rowdy - Most likely a previous owner either polished off the epoxy blue on the grip frame or else installed a grip frame from an early duo-tone Frontier Scout. The grip frames of all the Colt .22 single action revolvers (except, of course, the rare SAA .22s) were the same and pretty much interchangeable. Nickel replacement parts were available in the past from Colt and from parts resellers so the cylinder and ejector rod housing were likely switched out some time back. The "eagle" grips are probably original to the gun.
None of this detracts from the fact that you have a nifty little 22 and they are lots of fun to shoot.
- - - Buckspen
 

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This is a 45 colt converted to .22 lr. the muzzel is still 45 as is the front of the clyinder. The clinder is split the front is stationary and the back turns.

 

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Evidently just show they could do it. The gun was done by king gun works in L.A. Arnold "Al " capone owned king gun works. Ura "Duke"duvall was kind of my mentor. Duke was capones BIL and worked helping out at the shop occasionaly. The would try out lots of stuff he said. Dukes been gone about 20 years now. He was one hell of a old time collector. That gun was on the cover of I think "Guns" magazine back around the early 60`s or so. Capone is long gone too but I belive his son might be running the outfit now?
Gun King's Armory
 
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