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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On Page 347 of "The Book of Colt Firearms" you will find Colt Official Police No. 692434 described as personal handgun of Arnold Goodwin. This Colt made it to Germany and in my collection. It has a skeleton hammer. You see it in the picture.

Many years later I could buy an Officers Model (heavy barrel) No. 613587 with the same kind of hammer.
Grips are checkered hard rubber like a New Service Revolver. The revolver is single action only with a short stroke... and really smooth. This type of hammer is identical to the hammer of Colt Official Police No. 692434.
The factory letters have nothing on the hammer or the single action only feature.
Firearm Gun Revolver Trigger Gun accessory
Revolver


Does anyone have an idea about this hammer and the history of both guns?

Peter

 

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Back in the 30's through the 50's was the hey-day of the revolver as a Match pistol.
Many custom hammers and sights were made by any number of custom gunsmiths and companies.

One of the most popular was King's, who offered a variety of hammers including an off-set type known as the King "Cock-eyed".
Many of these custom makers made versions of other companies accessories, so unless the hammer or gun itself is marked it's difficult to determine who did it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Please have another look at the Goodwin-Revolver. The frame is different, the grips are custom.
the OM is even more off the mark.The Grips look New Service to me. But it is an OM.

Has anybody seen this kind of grip on an Officers Model or an Official Police????
Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Starting pistol
 

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Please have another look at the Goodwin-Revolver. The frame is different, the grips are custom.
the OM is even more off the mark.The Grips look New Service to me. But it is an OM.

Has anybody seen this kind of grip on an Officers Model or an Official Police????
View attachment 609463
I think I have a pair of Stocks like those, they look like the "New Service" Stocks rather than the .41 Frame / Army Special Hard Rubber Stocks.

Colt changed to Checked Walnut by the mid-latter 1920s...so, unless using up old Stock, or a special Order requesting old Stock 'Stocks', we would not expect to see any Factory installed Hard Rubber Stocks on Revolvers of the 1940s.

I have been curious about them, and wishing to know more.

Might be they are late "New Navy" Stocks?

Or, earliest "Army Special" Stocks?

Definitely not the same style as the usual 'Army Special' Hard Rubber anyway...and or same style as the "New Service", but smaller, for the .41 Size Frame Models.

I like how they look..!

Not sure what to call them!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
some more on theses Colts

My idea is that someone - possibly at Colt - worked on both revolvers.
This would explain the strange parts.
The OM has a sideplate that does not look like it came with the gun originally -colour a bit different.
these are the Archive Letters for the Goodwin-Colt and the OM. Colt has no other information. So what Wilson tells in his big book is just Wilson.... Please have a look - my revolver is the third from top.

Text Document Font Paper Paper product
Text Font Document Paper Paper product
Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Airsoft gun
 

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The letters tend to indicate that both pistols were originally generic guard guns. (The defense supplies corp was the WWII government agency buying guns and reselling to defense industries and police departments) Thus any trigger or action work would have been done at a later date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The letters tend to indicate that both pistols were originally generic guard guns. (The defense supplies corp was the WWII government agency buying guns and reselling to defense industries and police departments) Thus any trigger or action work would have been done at a later date.
If Mr. Wilson in his book tells us something out of real life the OP must have got back to Colt and then fallen into Goodwins hands....
 

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I bought it about 15 years ago from Scheel's in Iowa City as you set it. Full Roper sights and grips. The other 2 are 22 and 38 have full Roper treatment with out the hammer.
I have no idea who did the work, I think the hammer is referred to as a speed hammer ?
 

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I personally would doubt that anyone at Colt did those hammers to order, although obviously a Colt employee did one for himself, and it was probably in his own time. Pierced hammers are a product of custom gunsmithing usually from late 50's to early 70's. Jim Hoag did that kind of work for years on semi's. Others did also. Eventually the enlarged hole became popular enough with competition shooters that everyone making parts brought out hammers that were done. I did some of that myself. Hammers are hardened when they are made and it is a major time consuming chore to do that work. There are two ways to do it. First is to drill/mill a hole through the hammer and then to file it out to shape with jewelers file. The second is by EDM with an electrode shaped to the size one wishes to finish with. Jim Hoag used EDM but Colt didn't possess that machinery for EDM when I was there for an armorers course in the custom shop in 1990. EDM wasn't around in 1944. Piercing the hammers does have a purpose. It takes weight away from the overall mass of the hammer and will allow the hammer to fall faster. Along with other changes it is a method to "speedlock" a handgun. With a faster lock time the deviation in aim at the time the trigger is squeezed is less therefore giving much better group size.
 

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The same design hard rubber grips were used on the New Service Model 1909 and on the Model 1895 New Navy.

N.C. Ordnance sell replicas and an original pair of New Navy 1895.

https://gungrip.com/colt-da-1895-navy-revolver-original-grips-1.aspx

Good find!

Yes, I did suspect the - or some of the - latter time period 'New Navy' Revolvers may have come with that pattern/design Hard Rubber Stock.

The earliest "Police Positives" had their own version also, just like the 'New Service' Hard Rubber, design wise, but their size of course...which was soon changed to the more familiar design which we associate with them and the Police Positive Specials and the Army Specials having the more ornamental motifs or whatever one may call them
.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
more pictures Goodwin Colt

first the Goodwin-Colt: It has the number 238 on the barrel and on the frame. I asked Colt. They have no additional information.
The No. 238 on frame and barrel is my biggest question!!!!!

Gun Revolver Wood Trigger Still life
Bicycle fork Metal
Dane axe Antique tool Tool Axe Throwing axe


and now the OM with the strange grips and the skeleton hammer. I will do another post with the grips.
Tool Claw hammer
Trigger
 
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