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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Slugging the bore on my 1929/30 Officers' Model, I find the internals dimensions to be .3525/.353 in the grooves and .345 on the lands!!! This is of course significantly smaller than a 9mm! I have been shooting and loading for a few months now and have yet to achive the accuracy I hope for. I cast some of my bullets and size the lead to .357, and of course jacketed are the same. Shooting jacketed bullets (even lead) that much larger than the bore is surely producing heightened pressures. What should I do? anything? unfortunately 9mm bullets don't have a crimp groove. I am waiting on a Lee .356 bullet size die to become available so I can give that a try. I wonder if this is a common issue with these guns or is this one unique? If anyone has any input I would truly appreciate it. The finish is not perfect but I absolutely LOVE this gun the action works like a dream, I never thought clicks could sound so good.
 

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i don't shoot target and getting a one inch group from a handgun at 15 yards or from a rifle at 100 has never been a concern. i have slugged a lot of bores, however, and found that the range of deviation between accepted norms and individual guns can be extreme. it's normal, and the longer ago an individual piece was produced the more normal it gets. handloaders can size their bullets to address the problem to a great extent, but the pressure concerns with american ammo produced under saami specs often border on the hysterical.

guns blowing up and injuring people are rare occurrences. of course, once is too many, especially if it happens to you, but signs of high pressure -- flattened primers, difficult extraction etc. -- will occur long before a gun "blows up."

i recently did some research into the m-1888 "commission" rifles which, everyone knows, will blow up if used with modern ammunition. i was unable to document a single instance of this, either through eyewitness testimony, a news article, a photograph or anything else, and i spent quite a bit of time looking.

likewise, there are those who think it's unsafe to use any smokeless ammunition in colt single actions made before 1898, when the company "warrented" the revolvers for smokeless use. i don't believe there was any revolutionary breakthrough in metallurgy in 1898, and the chamber walls remained the same thickness in the various calibers as before. in his classic "sixguns," which deals extensively with the saa, elmer keith makes no distinction between pre and post 1898 guns when recommending his souped up loads.

from a safety point of view, i wouldn't worry about the pressure of any modern, standard velocity, .38 special load in any shootable gun specifically chambered for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks

Thanks for responding. I appreciate your input. I am new to shooting and have to be very careful, meaning that input from you and others who have some experience is important. It is good to know that I can shoot this masterpiece (for me anyway.)
 
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