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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Before I call my gunsmith will replacing the hand or the latch pin help at all? I noticed after doing a complete brake down and cleaning of my revolver that its out of time. When I pull the hammer back slowly there is still some ways to go before the bolt goes all the way home.When press the ejector rod away from the frame there is some play if that means anything.
 

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If you break down the gun and carefully inspect the action while cycling it with the side plate off, you will be able to determine that holding the hand against the recoil shield will solve the problem. As the hand rotates the cylinder, the last bit of movement involves the hand sliding past the ratchet projection and pushing on the side of the ratchet projection to complete the movement into lockup. That is why pushing the hand against the recoil shield works to complete lockup.

The "accepted" way to resolve the problem is with a thicker hand, one which will take up the "play" in the hand window and keep it tight against the recoil shield side of the hand window. However, "thicker" hands are no longer available as far as I know.

I fixed an Anaconda with the same problem by putting a curve into the hand, thus making it appear "thicker" by taking up the extra space in the hand window and forcing the hand tight against the recoil shield side of the hand window. I did that by screwing down a 12-inch adjustable wrench tight on each end of the hand and applying enough pressure to bend the hand. I found the hand to be very tough, so it took quite a bit of force to bend the hand - even with the leverage of the 12-inch wrenches. It does not take much of a bend to take up the excess space in the hand window, but getting any bend at all took quite a bit of force.

Any swing-out cylinder Colt without a forward locking mechanism on the crane (which is all of them), will exhibit some "play," which may be what you are describing in regard to pushing the "ejector rod away from the frame." (Since the ejector rod rests IN its closed shroud when the cylinder is closed, how can you PUSH it away from the frame? Are you using a hook to get ahold of the ejector rod and trying to PULL it out?)

Bending the hand will solve the problem. No need for a gun smith, who probably will say an oversized hand is not available and thus the condition cannot be repaired.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")​
 

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Judge,

While not the OP, I do appreciate your reply. I just picked up a 2" Nickel Lawman that is in great shape, hence my interest in this post. Mine times just fine, but I have done a ton of reading here on these models, and am trying to absorb everything I can about them. I intend to shoot mine quite a bit.

My question is whether the hand is sintered in these models? If so, would trying to bend be problematic? I know the triggers are from research here, but I have not found a detailed description of what other parts may be sintered.

Thanks,

Craig
 

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I doubt that the hand is sintered or MIM. Sintered or MIM parts are usually used where the shape is complex and machining the shape would be difficult. The hand is a simple flat shape, probably made out of flat stock. I can see no reason to make the hand out of MIM or sintered material. If the hand were sintered, then bending it could be a problem. I do not believe it is sintered, but proceed at your own risk, obviously.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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Mark III hands show definite signs of being made of stamped steel.

Warning: They sometimes do just snap in half if attempted to be bent.

New hands are available, at least from Coltparts.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Judgecolt, my lawman does not have a shrouded ejector rod.Its the 4" barrel model so its not. Its my fault for not saying. As far as the hand being sintered I don't believe it is either so to-nite its trial and error.Thanks for the info lets see how it goes.dfariswheel I hope that doesn't happen :)
http://www.coltforum.com/forums/members/146.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Judgecolt, that method worked like a charm!!!! My Lawman is in time and ready to go. Its grate! Not only that, when the hammer is fully cocked in s/a the cylinder is SUPER tight now as well.



Thanks!!!

Ed
 

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That IS great! Glad it worked!

My bad for not reading the obvious reference to "Lawman." I was thinking only Mark III Trooper. Sorry for that silly error.

DFW, I was not able to purchase a "fat" hand from Colt parts, which had only "standard" hands.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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Wow, that is nice happy ending. Thanks gang, for the confirmation on the hand material. I too would think that there would be no cost savings in a part that can be readily stamped.

I hope this would not be considered a hijack, but would it OK to ask a timing question in this thread? I have read a lot of posts about the timing and the turn ring that develops on these revolvers. Especially the posts that say the turn ring will not form if you always go to full cock to release the hammer. On my MK III, the bolt definately pops up at what I would call 2/3's the distance between the exiting bolt notch and the next one up. Just trying to understand the sequence better, and how to know whether the timing is good, or on the edge. And yes, Kuhnhausen's book will be ordered shortly.

Thanks,

Craig
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Craig, for the MK III's the bolt does pop up way before the notch has come over it,as its supposed to. As far as timing goes so long as the bolt as seated fully before full cock your ok. I think its supposed seat in the notch at 2/3's of the hammers travel in S/A. Reason being that in D/A the hammer only goes alittle over 2/3's before is drops. The way I found out mine was off was by cocking the hammer very slowly and when fully cocked my cylinder and bolt had not yet locked up. I had to turn the cylinder with my finger the rest of the way then I'd here that snap when the bolt fell in the notch.
 

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All the later Colt DA revolvers, starting with the Mark III series are designed to allow the bolt to "ride" on the surface of the cylinder for most of it's travel.
Like most DA revolvers other then the older Colt designs like the Python, this is normal and actually necessary for the action to operate correctly.
All these guns WILL leave a cylinder line.
 

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Thank you most kindly for that information. When I bought this gun I suspected someone previous had popped the hood. I confirmed this when I opened it up and saw a small pry mark on the top of the side plate on the inside. Nothing appeared to be molested inside, as I was fearing that maybe the hammer/sear had been monkied with. All inside surfaces looked good, and the hand was looking proper. I guess when I researched here on the timing/cylinder ring, I failed to note the differences between the older and modern guns. I'll rest easier now. I'll focus now on leather and ammo ;^).

Craig
 

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I'll focus now on leather and ammo

No, in order to fit in on a gun forum, you now need to start a 10 page discussion on what the best lubricant is.:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Lol..... But really though m pro7 haha.
 

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Given that it is a nickel 357 snubby, we could do lubricants, solvents that attack nickel or even what's the best ammo, 357 or 38 +p for bear defense ;^) The controversies are almost limitless.....It's nice to see that you Colt collectors are not too stuffy.

Craig
 
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