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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, the good fairy drops in ...

Couldn't help posturing another question, particularly to Mr.'s Wheel, Colt and Foster and anyone else that would like to join in. May I? You've just been commisioned to write an article for Outdoor Life or some such on gun collecting. You've been assigned - or if that's painful, chosen to write about Colt 2X revolvers. The title has been picked by the publisher's wife - it's, " Colt Pre-Python Perfection." Are you game? Tell us about your personal stable of Colts and a world-class (?) mini-collection. You don't have to actually own them - remember, the good fairy is picking up the bill and can make just about anything available. I look forward to hearing from you.
 

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Re: So, the good fairy drops in ...

I'll defer on this for a bit for two reasons.

First, I'd like to see if Ira Paine, who is perhaps the most advanced collector posting here, will take this up.

Second, while I do have good examples of all of the major variants, and some minor ones, pictures are an important part of such an article. As I am closing one server and setting up another I'll not be able to post pictures for a week or two.

Bob
 

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Re: So, the good fairy drops in ...

Of course the classic article would be on the various Colt Target Model revolvers.

The pre-war Target Models were the top-of-the-line in revolvers, and pretty well ruled the roost in matches.

The 1930's Colt's were almost certainly the finest quality revolvers ever made, any where, by any body, rivaled only by the Python.

Features like the checkered backstraps, and triggers, stocks fitted to the individual gun, and the incomparable Colt pre-war bluing put it at the pinnacle of the pistol world.

These were the days when even the "budget" Official Police had to be hand fitted just to function correctly, and Colt had what amounted to a "farm team" system of polishers and fitters.

Only the best, most experienced fitters assembled the Target Models, and only the Python could rival the quality of the action.

Since my area of interest is the post-war Colt, and I didn't see a large number of them for repair, I'd have to pass the writing of a good article to someone with more experience with the Target Models.

Another choice might be the Colt Detective Special models.

The DS was so "perfect" that from it's inception in 1927 to the early 1950's S&W didn't even bother to attempt to build a competitor.

The DS OWNED the market for small revolvers, and if you were off-duty, undercover or a detective, you carried a Colt Detective Special. The name said it all, and the gun was more a "badge of Office" than a badge was.

So prevalent was the Colt among police, it came to be known as a "cop gun", and anybody carrying one was assumed to be a police officer.

This reached such a level, that anyone arrested carrying a Colt DS was suspected of attempting to impersonate a police officer.

With the exception of the early square butt late 20's model, it isn't too difficult to find a good condition representative example of all the "generations" of the Colt DS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: So, the good fairy drops in ...

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dfariswheel:
Of course the classic article would be on the various Colt Target Model revolvers.

The pre-war Target Models were the top-of-the-line in revolvers, and pretty well ruled the roost in matches.

The 1930's Colt's were almost certainly the finest quality revolvers ever made, any where, by any body, rivaled only by the Python.

Features like the checkered backstraps, and triggers, stocks fitted to the individual gun, and the incomparable Colt pre-war bluing put it at the pinnacle of the pistol world.

These were the days when even the "budget" Official Police had to be hand fitted just to function correctly, and Colt had what amounted to a "farm team" system of polishers and fitters.

Only the best, most experienced fitters assembled the Target Models, and only the Python could rival the quality of the action.

Since my area of interest is the post-war Colt, and I didn't see a large number of them for repair, I'd have to pass the writing of a good article to someone with more experience with the Target Models.

Another choice might be the Colt Detective Special models.

The DS was so "perfect" that from it's inception in 1927 to the early 1950's S&W didn't even bother to attempt to build a competitor.

The DS OWNED the market for small revolvers, and if you were off-duty, undercover or a detective, you carried a Colt Detective Special. The name said it all, and the gun was more a "badge of Office" than a badge was.

So prevalent was the Colt among police, it came to be known as a "cop gun", and anybody carrying one was assumed to be a police officer.

This reached such a level, that anyone arrested carrying a Colt DS was suspected of attempting to impersonate a police officer.

With the exception of the early square butt late 20's model, it isn't too difficult to find a good condition representative example of all the "generations" of the Colt DS.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Re: So, the good fairy drops in ...

Dear Dr. Wheel: Again, thanks for the info and thoughts. I think you SHOULD write a book. I'll buy three copies if you sign them for me. A heretical question? I'm sure pre-war Colts are magnificent. The few I've seen and handled are magnificent. Mighty heavy but magnificent. And I've read all the horrible stuff about J. Edgar Hoover of the last ten years or so ... but, tell me why - but be gentle, why did Ed McGivern and J. Edgar do S&W's?
 

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Re: So, the good fairy drops in ...

Gently speking,

I beleive Elmer Keith quoted McGivern as saying only the S&W M&P revolver was fast enough to to the type of shooting he did.

Mr. Hoover is greatly hated by the left these days... curiously the things the accuse him of for the most parts are things they tell us are ok or even "normal."

None of the things they say are true of Mr. Hoover are proved... nothing more than character assasination pure and simple... the left hates his believe in the United States, in law and order and his religion.

He had S&W Registered Magnum #1.

FWIW

Chuck
 

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Re: So, the good fairy drops in ...

The reason there IS both a Colt and a S&W, is because people like McGivern and J. Edgar have preferences, and make personal choices.

McGivern favored the S&W trigger action, but he also owned and shot Colt's.

The FBI issued many Colt's over the years, and during the 50's through the late 70's the "in" pistol at the FBI was the 2 1/2" Colt Python.

As a number of writers have stated, you'll notice that all the charges about Hoover's being a gay, cross-dresser, total nut job; weren't written down until AFTER he was safely dead.

As Ann Coulter said in her book "Treason", any writer who could have proven that Hoover was gay or a cross-dresser would have been given a Pulitzer prize INSTANTLY, they hated him so badly.

The truth is, the very people who knew him best, (and often hated him the most) were the FBI headquarters people. ALL of them say these stories are total BS.

J. Edger Hoover was simply one of those odd people who devote 100% of their life to their work. Hoover built the most powerful police agency in history, and that process left no room for anything else.
That doesn't make him gay, just sad or dedicated, depending on your point of view.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: So, the good fairy drops in ...

I guess we're talking, "mighty good guns," from whomever. I got to shoot a 2 1/2" Python once and thought it was fantastic! At the time, I was using a 4" Python as my police duty gun. The, "shortie," came from a, "bad guy," and soon took up residence in the evidence locker. I got permission, once, to take it out and shoot it. I always wanted to use it on the PPC course we shot at the time and see what would happen but never got the chance. J. Edgar's gun, I guess, would have been a pre-27 .357 with a 3 1/2" - no? I know it's a Smith and I'm a Colt fan but I'd find the money to buy one of those if it popped up, "Way out west in Kansas!"
 
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